Archive for the 'Melbourne' Category

04
Jul
21

Photo album: John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell (1892-1960), 1922-1933 Part 1

July 2021

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers should be aware that this posting contains images and names of people who may have since passed away.

 

 

John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell (1892-1960), 1922-1933 photo album front cover

 

John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album front cover

 

 

Discovered in an op shop (charity shop in America), this is the most historically important and exciting Australian photo album that I have ever found!

Belonging to John “Jack” Riverston Faviell, a senior New South Wales public accountant and featuring his photographs, the album ranges across the spectrum of Australian life and culture from the East to the West of the continent in the years 1922-1933. A list of locations and topics can be seen below.

I will undertake a fuller analysis of the album Part 2 of the posting, which will contain unknown photographs of the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

In this posting there are some important photographs of “Aboriginal Types, along the Trans-Australian Railway” and “Australian Desert Blacks.” The Indigenous Australians had come to trade boomerangs and spears in return for money and clothing. According to the excellent book Bitter Fruit: Australian photographs to 1963 by Michael Graham-Stewart and Francis McWhannell, after the completion of the continental railway in 1917,

“The Railway provided a source of income for Aboriginal people, much to the ire of the Chief Protector  of Aborigines in Western Australia, A. O. Neville, to whom the slightest hint of autonomy was anathema. There was some begging (Neville was convinced that children were being ‘bred’ for the purpose), but also a system of charging for photographs. Boomerang and spear demonstrations were given, and artefacts were souvenired.

The most important stop on the line was Ooldea. This was situated six kilometres south of Ooldea Soak, one of the few places in the region with permanent water. The site had long been of great ceremonial and social significance for Aboriginal people, a fact attested by the profusion of stone artefacts in the area… It was a junction of migratory routes, a centre for exchange, and a refuge in times of drought.”1

.
As Episode 1 of the series ‘Australia in Colour’ states of similar home movie images, “these photographs offer an unfiltered glimpse into a world seldom seen.”2

Other fascinating images in this posting include the grave of bushranger John Dunn; the Macquarie Watchtower in La Perouse; the goldfields and mines of Kalgoorlie and “Boulder City” in Western Australia; the oldest inhabitant of Geraldton, W.A.; Fremantle prison; and pearling in Shark’s Bay, W.A. including two photographs – one of the dilapidated “White’s Cemetery” with single cross and bones and the other a “Grave in the Niggers Cemetery” with nothing but a mound of earth and some dead branches. Other photographs offer casual racism as a matter of course in their titles.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

Footnotes

  1. Michael Graham-Stewart and Francis McWhannell. Bitter Fruit: Australian photographs to 1963. Michael Graham-Stewart, 2017, p. 66.
  2. Episode 1 Season 1: “Outpost Of Empire”: This episode charts the story of the nation from 1897 to 1929 as agriculture transforms the land. ‘Australia in Colour’ is the history of Australia told via a unique collection of cinematic moments brought to life for the first time in stunning colour. It tells the story of how Australia came to be the nation it is today. Narrated by Hugo Weaving, it’s a reflection on our nation’s character, its attitudes, its politics, and its struggle to value its Indigenous and multicultural past. ‘Australia in Colour’ gives us a chance to relive history from a fresh perspective.

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Grateful thankx to Douglas Stewart Fine Books for their research help with this photo album. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

“Biscuits and cake and fruit were thrown to them from the train windows, while their boomerangs and native weapons, and their importance in the landscape as subjects for photography, brought many a shilling and sixpence for them to spend.”

.
Daisy Bates, The Passing of the Aborigines quoted in Bitter Fruit: Australian photographs to 1963.1

 

“John “Jack” Riverston Faviell, was a senior NSW public accountant. Originally from Colinroobie, near Narrandera in NSW, he married Melanie Audrey Pickburn (daughter of Judge Pickburn) in a society wedding at St James’ Church, Sydney, in February 1925. He built no. 20 Yarranabbe Rd, Darling Point as their first married home but he divorced Audrey in October 1930. He would later remarry in 1934, as would Audrey.”

.
Jon Dickson. Douglas Stewart Fine Books

 

Locations

  • Blue Mountains, NSW (1922)
  • Leura Falls, NSW (1922)
  • Weeping Rock, Wentworth Falls, NSW (1922)
  • Tarana Picnic Races, NSW (1922)
  • Doona, Breeza, NSW (1922)
  • Avoca, NSW (1922)
  • Newcastle Races, NSW (1923)
  • Belmont / Belmont Regatta, NSW (1923)
  • Hawkesbury, NSW (1923)
  • Frenches Forest, NSW (1923)
  • “Foxlow” Station, Bungedore, NSW (1923)
  • Sydney, NSW (Customs House, National Art Gallery, Mitchell Library, Darlinghurst Courthouse) (1923)
  • Muswellbrook Picnic Races, NSW (1923)
  • Maitland / Maitland Cup Meeting, NSW (1923)
  • Breeza, NSW (1923)
  • Wiseman’s Ferry, NSW (1923)
  • Moss Vale / Sutton Forest Church, NSW (1923)
  • Frensham, NSW (1923)
  • La Perouse, NSW (Historical Society Excursion) (1923)
  • Old Customs Watch Tower, La Perouse (1923)
  • The Old Illawarra Road, NSW (1923)
  • Yarcowie, SA (1923)
  • Trans-Australian Railway (Port Augusta to Kalgoorlie) (1923)
  • Karonie, WA (1923)
  • Kalgoorlie, WA (1923)
  • Boulder City, WA (1923)
  • Fremantle, WA (1923)
  • Geraldton, WA (1923)
  • Shark’s Bay, WA (1923)
  • Henry Freycinet Estuary, WA (1923)
  • Tamala Station, WA (1923)
  • Perth, WA (1923)
  • Adelaide, SA (Torrens River) (1923)
  • “Redbank,” Scone, NSW (1924)
  • Muswellbrook Picnic Races, NSW (1924)
  • “Craigieburn,” Bowral, NSW (1924)
  • The Dudley Cup at Kensington, NSW (1924)
  • Camden Grammar School, NSW (1924)
  • Liverpool Church, NSW (1924)
  • Landsdowne Bridge, NSW (1924)
  • Jenolan Caves, NSW (1924)
  • Avon Dam, NSW (1924)
  • Herald Office, Pitt Street, NSW (1924)
  • Camping, Cronulla, NSW (1925)
  • Roseville, NSW (1926)
  • Whale Beach, NSW (1927)
  • Visit of the Duke and Duchess of York, Macquarie Street, NSW (1927)
  • 20, Yarranabbe Rd., Darling Point, NSW (1926)
  • Canberra, ACT (1927)
  • Jenolan Caves, NSW (Lady Dorothy Hope-Morley) (1927)
  • Ellen’s Isle, Loch Katrine, Scotland (1925)
  • Sydney Harbour Bridge, NSW (1931-32)
  • “Springfield,” Byng, Near Orange, NSW (1932)
  • Lucknow, near Orange, NSW (1933)
  • Hawkesbury, NSW (1933)
  • Bathurst, NSW (1933)
  • “Millambri, ” Canowindra, NSW (1933)
  • Melbourne, VIC (1933)

 

Topics

  • Men
  • Pastoralism and grazing
  • Horses / country horse racing
  • Sheep and shearing
  • Cows
  • Mill / logging
  • Pine plantation
  • Bush
  • Bores and dams
  • Cathedral / churches
  • Tennis
  • Golf
  • Cars (Ford, Pan-American, Essex, Oldsmobile, early Hupmobile, Chrysler 70)
  • Buses
  • Bank, post office
  • Pastoral Play
  • Monuments
  • Rock carvings
  • Houses
  • Cemetery / tombstones
  • John Dunn, executed 1866
  • South Australian Railways / locomotives
  • S.A. constable and Adelaide cop
  • Indigenous Australians (Aboriginal types, along the Trans-Australian Railway)
  • Australian Desert Blacks
  • Gold mine / gold panning
  • Mining (Boulder and Perseverance Mines)
  • Convict gaol
  • Oldest inhabitant (Henry Desmond)
  • Hotels
  • Beach and sea, surf girls
  • Mother of pearl
  • Dates
  • Afghan / camels
  • Yachting, sailing / boats
  • Guano
  • Fred Adams, Boss-Pearler
  • Stations and station hands
  • Rowing
  • Dredging
  • Polo
  • Rugby
  • Caves
  • Guns
  • Nobility and royalty
  • Camping, picnics
  • Tennis
  • House building / old houses
  • Parliament House
  • Prime Ministers residence
  • Bridges and bridge building
  • Federal and state governors
  • The world’s first auto-gyro plane (1909-1912)
  • The Southern Cross
  • Pioneers
  • Mounted police
  • First house in Byng
  • Rabbiting
  • Glamour
  • Social status / socialite
  • Family
  • Women and children
  • Sydney Harbour Bridge opening
  • Carillon (bells)
  • Myers and Bourke Street, Melbourne

 

 

"Blue Mountains, N.S.W," January 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Blue Mountains, N.S.W,” January, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Blue Mountains, N.S.W," January 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Blue Mountains, N.S.W,” January, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Blue Mountains, N.S.W," January 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Blue Mountains, N.S.W,” January, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains are a mountainous region and a mountain range located in New South Wales, Australia. The region borders on Sydney’s metropolitan area, its foothills starting about 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of centre of the state capital, close to the major suburb of Penrith. The public’s understanding of the extent of the Blue Mountains is varied, as it forms only part of an extensive mountainous area associated with the Great Dividing Range. Officially the Blue Mountains region is bounded by the Nepean and Hawkesbury rivers in the east, the Coxs River and Lake Burragorang to the west and south, and the Wolgan and Colo rivers to the north. Geologically, it is situated in the central parts of the Sydney Basin. …

The Blue Mountains have been inhabited for millennia by the Gundungurra people, now represented by the Gundungurra Tribal Council Aboriginal Corporation based in Katoomba, and, in the lower Blue Mountains, by the Darug people, now represented by the Darug Tribal Aboriginal Corporation…

Examples of Aboriginal habitation can be found in many places. In the Red Hands Cave, a rock shelter near Glenbrook, the walls contain hand stencils from adults and children. On the southern side of Queen Elizabeth Drive, at Wentworth Falls, a rocky knoll has a large number of grinding grooves created by rubbing stone implements on the rock to shape and sharpen them. There are also carved images of animal tracks and an occupation cave. The site is known as Kings Tableland Aboriginal Site and dates back 22,000 years.

Text from the Wikipedia website

You’ll find the locality of Kanimbla Valley in New South Wales about 90km west-northwest of Sydney. At about 677m above sea level, Kanimbla Valley is one of the higher localities in New South Wales.

 

"Tarana Picnic Races," January 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Tarana Picnic Races,” January, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

Tarana

Tarana is a small town in the Central West of New South Wales, Australia in the City of Lithgow.

 

"Doona, Breeza," October 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Doona, Breeza,” October, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

J. Pickering – John Pickering, grazier of Breeza, Upper Hunter Valley, killed by a log he was loading onto a wagon in February 1924.
B.B. Capper – Capper family of Rossmer Homestead at Breeza, Upper Hunter Valley.
Doona Station and Breeza Station owned by the Clift family.

Information from Douglas Stewart Fine Books

 

"Doona, Breeza," October 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Doona, Breeza,” October, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Breeza

Breeza is a small village located about 45 kilometres south east of Gunnedah on the Kamilaroi Highway. The aboriginal name for Breeza means “one hill”.

The village overlooks the rich fertile Liverpool Plains and this diverse farming area produces many and varied crops throughout the year. When in season, the fields of sunflowers, sorghum, canola, wheat and cotton provide a picturesque vista across the sweeping plains.

Breeza was settled in 1848 by Andrew Lang. Old folk say that Bushranger Ben Hall was born at Breeza, he was in fact born near Maitland, but his father, Ben Hall Snr worked on Breeza Station at one time. A mural ‘Ben Hall’s Wall’ stands in the heart of Breeza to commemorate Ben Hall’s final years set against “those wild colonial days” of yesteryear.

Text from the australias.guide website [Online] Cited 18/10/2019

 

"Avoca," Xmas, 1922 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Avoca,” Xmas, 1922 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Avoca Beach

Avoca Beach is a coastal suburb of the Central Coast region of New South Wales, Australia, about 95 kilometres (59 mi) north of Sydney. Avoca Beach is primarily a residential suburb but also a popular tourist destination. Terrigal is a major coastal suburb of the Central Coast region of New South Wales, Australia, located 12 kilometres (7 mi) east of Gosford on the Pacific Ocean. (Text from the Wikipedia website)

 

"Newcastle Races," New Year, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Newcastle Races,” New Year, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Located in the heart of Newcastle on the picturesque Hunter Coast only two hours drive north of Sydney is Newcastle Racecourse. In operation for over 100 years, the Newcastle Racecourse is the largest provincial club in NSW.

 

"Belmont," New Year, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Belmont,” New Year, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

Belmont, on Lake Macquarie near Newcastle, NSW.

 

"Saddington's Ford," New Year, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Saddington’s Ford,” New Year, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Belmont," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Belmont,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

John C Reid and Mark C Reid

The Reid brothers John C Reid and Mark C Reid were nephews of Sir George Houstoun Reid, 4th Prime Minister of Australia and former Premier of New South Wales prior to Federation. On Friday 14 January, 1898 the Reid boys were at the train station to welcome their uncle the Premier to Newcastle.

Roger Steel, Historian, Belmont

 

O.E. Friend (died 1942)

O.E. Friend was a very wealthy man and was Director of the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney with a keen interest in pastoral pursuits, investments, etc., Perhaps Faviell worked for Friend or was a close confidante, which would explain all the shots of pastoral locations (Friend’s interests).

Information from Douglas Stewart Fine Books

 

Obituary

MR. O. E. FRIEND DIES IN SYDNEY

Mr O. E. Friend, 60, died today. He was a director of the Permanent Trustee Company, the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, Pitt, Son, and Badgery, the United Insurance, and Howard Smith companies, and several other business organisations. Mr. Friend was keenly interested in pastoral pursuits. He was chairman of directors of Retreat Station Ltd., Queensland, and was formerly president of the Royal Historical Society.

The Courier-Mail, Brisbane, Qld., Tue 26 May, 1942, Page 4 on the Trove website [Online] Cited 05/11/2019

 

"Belmont Regatta," 1.1.23 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Belmont Regatta,” 1.1.23 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Belmont Regatta

I am researching the local history of Belmont, NSW and in particular the history of the Belmont Sailing Club. The Belmont Sailing Club was formed at a meeting on 13th May 1922 and it held its first race on 7th October 1922.

Whilst an annual regatta had been held on Belmont Bay for some decades, the Belmont Regatta held on 1st January 1923 is the first run under the auspices of the newly formed Belmont Sailing Club. The photo in the album would be the earliest photograph of 16ft skiffs sailing on Belmont Bay.

Interestingly, John C. Reid, living in Weeroona on the shores of Lake Macquarie was the sailing club’s first patron, having been involved previously with the Belmont regattas as well as the regattas held on Newcastle Harbour. He was also a benefactor providing trophies for the club and had a high profile having formerly been the Mayor of Newcastle and the French Consul for Newcastle, there to assist French sailors. He played a significant role following the wreck of the ship Adolphe (1904, see below) in Newcastle Harbour. His younger brother Mark Christian Reid was the sailing club’s first President. Both of these men lived truly amazing lives.

Is there any possibility of getting a high resolution scan of a few of these photographs?  In particular the photo of the 1923 Belmont Regatta is priceless.

The skiffs in the club then used numbers on their sails instead of ensigns like other 16ft skiff clubs. Its hard to see, but it looks like the leading skiff has the number one on the sail, making it the skiff named ‘Clift’ (No numbers are visible on the sails just splotches – Marcus). That name Clift is significant in Belmont as you can see from your photo album. The Clifts were wealthy graziers from Breeza who would holiday at Belmont in their 17 room home.

Roger Steel, Historian, Belmont

Email to Marcus Bunyan 07/07/2021

 

'Adolphe' as photographed on 30 September 1904

 

This slide depicts the wreck of the Adolphe as photographed on 30 September 1904. You can also see the mast of the shipwreck Regent Murray in this photo.
University of Newcastle Library’s Cultural Collections

 

 

Adolphe

The Adolphe was a sailing ship that was wrecked at the mouth of the Hunter River in New South Wales, Australia, in 1904. The ship is now the most prominent of several wrecks on what is now the Stockton breakwall, which protects Newcastle harbour. The rescue of the ship’s crew has gone down in local maritime history as one of the most remarkable in local waters.

On 30 September 1904, the Adolphe was being towed through the entrance of Newcastle harbour by the tugs Hero and Victoria after an 85-day voyage in ballast from Antwerp under the command of Captain Lucas. Heavy seas prevented the tugs from holding her, and after the tug hawser parted she was swept first on to the wreck of the Colonist, then battered by waves that forced her on top of other submerged wrecks on what was then called the Oyster Bank. The lifeboat hurried to the scene and within two hours all 32 of the crew had been taken off. The northern breakwater of the entrance to the port of Newcastle was extended after the loss of the Adolphe. The French consul made an official visit to Newcastle to recognise the efforts of the lifeboat crew.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Fun at The Lake," 17/19 February, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Fun at The Lake,” 17/19 February, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"O.E.F. (O.E. Friend) & B.B.C. (Basil Cappers)," 17/19 February, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“O.E.F. (O.E. Friend) & B.B.C. (Basil Cappers),” 17/19 February, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"The Basil Cappers' departure for England," 9 March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The Basil Cappers’ departure for England,” 9 March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Untitled," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Untitled,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Pan-American, 6666," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Pan-American, 6666,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"The Hawkesbury from the train," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The Hawkesbury from the train,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Foxlow," 3/5 March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Foxlow,” 3/5 March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Foxlow," March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Foxlow,” March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Foxlow," 3/5 March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Foxlow,” 3/5 March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Foxlow Station, Bungendore," 3/5 March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Foxlow Station, Bungendore,” 3/5 March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Foxlow," 3/5 March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Foxlow,” 3/5 March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Foxlow

Bungendore property “Foxlow” has more than 7500 hectares of land. It was purchased by F.B.S Falkiner (the son of F.S. Falkiner) in 1920.

Before the Falkiner family ownership, “Foxlow” had been in the hands of the Osborne family, and previously the Rutledge family; they had a short ownership of two years after purchasing it from John Hosking, in the 1860s. Hosking himself was the first mayor of Sydney, and had given the property its name, after his wife, Martha Foxlow Terry.

Mr Falkiner said “Foxlow” was one of the first farms to be taken up in the Molonglo Valley.

The property was profiled in The Land‘s country homes series in 1976, which detailed the property’s history extending back to an original grant in 1839 to Thomas Wood.

It is not known exactly when Hosking himself purchased the property, but his ownership lasted until 1868 when it was purchased by Thomas Rutledge, and then later George Osborne, who had owned the property for 50 years before the Falkiner family ownership.

Nick Heydon. “Historic ‘Foxlow’ offering,” on The Land website 26 April 2014 [Online] Cited 28/10/2019

Foxlow sold for $15 million in 2015.

 

"Mr Friend examining the old bell," March, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Mr Friend examining the old bell,” March, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Sydney," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Sydney,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Customs House," Sydney, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Customs House,” Sydney, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Customs House, Sydney

Customs House, Sydney is a heritage-listed museum space, visitor attraction, commercial building and performance space located in the Circular Quay area at 45 Alfred Street, in the Sydney central business district, in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. The building served as a customs house prior to Federation and then as the head office of New South Wales operations of the Government of Australia agency Department of Trade and Customs (and its successors) until 1988. The customs function relocated to a new site in 1990. The initial designs were by Mortimer Lewis and it was built during 1845 by under the administration of Governor Sir George Gipps.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"National Art Gallery," Sydney, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“National Art Gallery,” Sydney, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Upper Hunter Amateur Race Club Meeting... (Muswellbrook Picnic Races)" 15/16 May, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Upper Hunter Amateur Race Club Meeting… (Muswellbrook Picnic Races)” 15/16 May, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Muswellbrook

Muswellbrook is a town in the Upper Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia, about 243 km (151 mi) north of Sydney and 127 km (79 mi) north-west of Newcastle. Geologically, Muswellbrook is situated in the northern parts of the Sydney basin, bordering the New England region. The area is predominantly known for coal mining and horse breeding, but has also developed a reputation for gourmet food and wine production.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Upper Hunter Amateur Race Club Meeting... (Muswellbrook Picnic Races)" 15/16 May, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Upper Hunter Amateur Race Club Meeting… (Muswellbrook Picnic Races)” 15/16 May, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"The Button's Essex," May, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The Button’s Essex,” May, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Muswellbrook Picnic Races," 15/16 May, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Muswellbrook Picnic Races,” 15/16 May, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Muswellbrook Picnic Races," 15/16 May, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Muswellbrook Picnic Races,” 15/16 May, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Belmont," 23/25 June, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Belmont,” 23/25 June, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

Belmont Soldier's Memorial Hall and Belmont School of Arts

 

Three women standing in front of Belmont Soldier’s Memorial Hall (middle) and Belmont School of Arts (right) in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Belmont Soldier’s Memorial Hall and Belmont School of Arts

My interest in the photo of the women in front of the Belmont Soldier’s Memorial Hall (opened 1921) (above) is also in the hope of seeing what is written on the building beside it (it says Belmont Literary Institute – more commonly known as the Belmont School of Arts, opened 1914). If it is the School of Arts, this suggests the building may have been moved at some stage. I’m very curious as I believed the School of Arts was close by in an adjoining street.

Roger Steel, Historian, Belmont

 

Belmont

Belmont is a suburb in the Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia, located 20 kilometres (12 mi) from Newcastle’s central business district on the eastern side of Lake Macquarie and is part of the City of Lake Macquarie. Belmont is situated on a sandy peninsula formed by the Tasman Sea on the east and Lake Macquarie.

 

""Weroona", Belmont," 23/25 June, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“”Weroona”, Belmont,” 23/25 June, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

3 women at Weeroona

 

3 women at Weeroona in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Weeroona and the Reid’s

If we look carefully at the photograph of the 3 women at Weeroona with the lake in the back ground (above), you can see the old stone ferry jetty. It was in a state of disrepair in 1923 and Mark C Reid, having been a former Alderman on Newcastle Council and a very prominent business man, was lobbying Lake Macquarie Shire Council to have the jetty repaired. Note this jetty became the club house of Lake Macquarie Yacht Club in the early 1930’s, built at the end of the pier, and still in the same location to this day. I’ve attached an old postcard (below) which shows a view of the yacht club from the Weeroona boatshed.

Some of the information from the Wikipedia page is not correct (below). John C Reid didn’t live in Weeroona during his retirement as he died relatively young and Mark C Reid took over his brother’s position as manager of John Reid Limited and as French Consul following his brother’s unexpected death. The Crippled Children’s Association did purchase Weeroona in about 1950 following Mark C Reid’s death however based on my memory, Weeroona would have been demolished much later than 1979.

Roger Steel, Historian, Belmont

 

John Christian Reid

John Christian Reid, JP (1873 – 20 March 1932) was a New South Wales businessman, yachtsman and alderman, who served several terms as Mayor of Newcastle… In retirement, Reid lived with his family at his residence, “Weroona”, in Belmont, which later became the holiday home for the NSW Crippled Children’s Association and was demolished in 1979.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

The Reid's water-front, Lake Macquarie

 

The Reid’s water-front, Lake Macquarie in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

Belmont, Near Newcastle

 

Belmont, Near Newcastle
1950s?
Postcard
Colour lithograph

 

"Maitland," 25 August, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Maitland,” 25 August, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Maitland

Maitland is a city in the Lower Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia and the seat of Maitland City Council, situated on the Hunter River approximately 166 kilometres (103 mi) by road north of Sydney and 35 km (22 mi) north-west of Newcastle. It is on the New England Highway about 17 km (11 mi) from its start at Hexham.

 

"Dr Kennedy's house, East Maitland," August, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Dr Kennedy’s house, East Maitland,” August, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Maitland Cup Meeting," Spring, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Maitland Cup Meeting,” Spring, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Finish of The Cup," Spring, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Finish of The Cup,” Spring, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Breeza (Doona Cyprus Pine Venture)," 13th September, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Breeza (Doona Cyprus Pine Venture),” 13th September, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

""Karua" household," September, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“”Karua” household,” September, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Breeza," 13th September, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Breeza,” 13th September, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

John Pickering was killed by a log, 1924. Cyprus Pine venture was an investment project that Friend and Faviell were working on with Pickering and Capper?

Information from Douglas Stewart Fine Books

 

Breeza

Breeza is a locality in New South Wales, Australia. It is about 43 kilometres south of Gunnedah, in the Liverpool Plains agricultural region. The area around Breeza in particular is called the “Breeza Plains”. The name “Breeza” may be derived from an Aboriginal word meaning “one hill”.

 

"The team in the bush," Breeza, September 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The team in the bush,” Breeza, September 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Breeza," 13th September, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Breeza,” 13th September, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Wiseman's Ferry," 25 November, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Wiseman’s Ferry,” 25 November, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Wisemans Ferry

Wisemans Ferry is a town in the state of New South Wales, Australia, located 75 kilometres north north-west of the Sydney central business district in the local government areas of Hornsby Shire, The Hills Shire, City of Hawkesbury and Central Coast Council. The town is a tourist spot with picnic and barbecue facilities. As well as a rich convict and colonial heritage in the area, the Dharug National Park and Yengo National Park are close by.

The town was originally called Lower Portland Headland, but the name was eventually changed to Wisemans Ferry, named after Solomon Wiseman, a former convict (1778-1838), who received a land grant in the area from Governor Macquarie in 1817. Wiseman established a ferry service on the Hawkesbury River in 1827 for the transport of produce and provisions to the convicts building the Great North Road and was known to many as King of the Hawkesbury.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Moss Vale," 8/9 December, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Moss Vale,” 8/9 December, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Moss Vale

Moss Vale is a town in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, Australia, in the Wingecarribee Shire. At the 2016 census, it has a population of 8,579 and is sited on the Illawarra Highway, which connects to Wollongong and the Illawarra coast via Macquarie Pass.

 

"Frensham Pastoral Play," 8th December 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Frensham Pastoral Play,” 8th December 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Frensham School

Frensham School is an independent non-denominational comprehensive single-sex early learning, primary, and secondary day and boarding school for girls, located at Mittagong, south of Sydney, in the Southern Highlands region of New South Wales, Australia.

 

"La Perouse (Historical Society Excursion)," 17 November, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“La Perouse (Historical Society Excursion),” 17 November, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Captain J. H. Watson, Royal Historical Society

O.E. Friend was President of the Royal Historical Society. Faviell was evidently also a member and visited La Perouse on a RHS excursion, with O.E. Friend. Friend disappears from the album after this time. Did Friend and Faviell part ways?

Information from Douglas Stewart Fine Books

 

La Perouse

La Perouse is a suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The suburb of La Perouse is located about 14 kilometres southeast of the Sydney central business district, in the City of Randwick.

 

"La Perouse (Historical Society Excursion)," 17 November, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“La Perouse (Historical Society Excursion),” 17 November, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"John Dunn. Executed, 19.3.1866," 17 November, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“John Dunn. Executed, 19.3.1866,” 17 November, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

John Dunn

John Dunn (14 December 1846 – 19 March 1866) was an Australian bushranger. He was born at Murrumburrah near Yass in New South Wales. He was 19 years old when he was hanged in Darlinghurst Gaol. He was buried in the former Devonshire Street Cemetery in Sydney.

 

"Old Customs Watch Tower, La Perouse," 17 November, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Old Customs Watch Tower, La Perouse,” 17 November, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Macquarie Watchtower

The Macquarie Watchtower is the earliest known surviving, sandstone tower building in Australia, the oldest surviving building on Botany Bay, and has long been recognised as a picturesque landmark on the headland, particularly popular for wedding photographs. The c. 1820 Macquarie Watchtower is thought to have been commissioned by Governor Macquarie. Not only is it the oldest surviving watchtower in Australia but it is the only known tower specifically constructed for colonial border protection and the prevention of smuggling.

 

"The old Illawarra Road," in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The old Illawarra Road,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Vera Capper and the children," in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Vera Capper and the children,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"South Australian Railways," in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“South Australian Railways,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

South Australian Railways

South Australian Railways (SAR) was the statutory corporation through which the Government of South Australia built and operated railways in South Australia from 1854 until March 1978, when its non-urban railways were incorporated into Australian National, and its Adelaide urban lines were transferred to the State Transport Authority.

 

"Terowie to Pt. Augusta, 120 ml," c. 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Terowie to Pt. Augusta, 120 ml.,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"S.A. Constable," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“S.A. Constable,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Trans-Australian Railway (Port August to Kalgoorlie, 1051 miles)," 1923 John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Trans-Australian Railway (Port August to Kalgoorlie, 1051 miles),” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Trans-Australian Railway

The Trans-Australian Railway crosses the Nullarbor Plain of Australia from Port Augusta in South Australia to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia. It includes a 478-kilometre (297 mi) stretch of dead-straight track, the world’s longest, between the 797 km (495 mi) post west of Ooldea and the 1,275 km (792 mi) post west of Loongana.

The line forms an important freight route between Western Australia and the eastern states. Currently two passenger services also use the line, the Indian Pacific for its entire length and The Ghan between Port Augusta and Tarcoola. Earlier passenger services on the route were known as the Great Western Express.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Aboriginal Types, along the Trans-Australian Railway," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Aboriginal Types, along the Trans-Australian Railway,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"At Ooldea, S.A." 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“At Ooldea, S.A.,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"At Barton, S.A.," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“At Barton, S.A.,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Ooldea," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Ooldea,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Ooldea

Ooldea is a tiny settlement in South Australia. It is on the eastern edge of the Nullarbor Plain, 863 km (536 mi) west of Port Augusta on the Trans-Australian Railway. Ooldea is 143 km (89 mi) from the bitumen Eyre Highway.

 

"At Ooldea," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“At Ooldea,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Australian Desert Blacks," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Australian Desert Blacks,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Untitled," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Untitled,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Kalgoorlie," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Kalgoorlie,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Kalgoorlie-Boulder

Kalgoorlie-Boulder, known colloquially as just Kalgoorlie, is a city in the Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia, located 595 km (370 mi) east-northeast of Perth at the end of the Great Eastern Highway. The city was founded in 1889 by the amalgamation of the towns of Kalgoorlie and Boulder, which developed in 1893 during the Coolgardie gold rush, on Western Australia’s “Golden Mile”. It is also the ultimate destination of the Goldfields Water Supply Scheme and the Golden Pipeline Heritage Trail.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Where gold was first found, by Hannan. 15 Jan., 1893," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Where gold was first found, by Hannan. 15 Jan., 1893,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Boulder City," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Boulder City,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Boulder

Boulder is a suburb in the Western Australian Goldfields 595 kilometres (370 mi) east of Perth and bordering onto the town of Kalgoorlie in the Eastern Goldfields region.

 

"Perseverence Mine," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Perseverence Mine,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Perseverance Gold Mine, Golden Mile Mines, Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Kalgoorlie-Boulder Shire, Western Australia, Australia

The lease was spoken as the richest 24 acre block on the Golden Mile in 1901. Ten shafts were on the lease, but the two most important was Main Shaft (700feet 1901) in the centre of the block accessing the Perseverance Lode, and No6 Shaft (600 feet 1901) near the southern boundary on the Consols Lode. Measurements are in imperial in keeping with the historic references. Lake View Consols was to its north, South Kalgurli to its south, Associated to its east, and Great Boulder Proprietary to its west.

The general manager of the mine was Ralph Nicholls who arrived in July 1899, about three years after the mine opened. He was in for a torrid time later. A new mill was constructed shortly after to process the sulphide ore, while remaining oxidised ore was taken to Hannan’s Public Crushing Company, which the mine owned. All ore was processed at a new mill constructed on the lease in 1910.

Around 1900 a series of scandals hit the Golden Mile mines. From 1896-1900 they had mined incredibly rich ore loads, but as these became exhausted, lower (but still very profitable) gold grades became the norm. Several of the mines had over estimated the potential gold which could be extracted, leading to wild fluctuations in share prices. Employees of the companies were accused of what we would now call insider trading of shares they owned.

Around 1903, the Boulder Perseverance Mine was the latest to be caught in the scandal. The outcry finally forced the Government’s hand which launched a Royal Commission. Delivering its report in 1904, it was scathing of the company.

Text from “Perseverance Gold Mine (Boulder Perseverance Mine),” on the mindat.org website [Online] Cited 29/10/2019

 

"Boulder Mine," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Boulder Mine,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Great Boulder Gold Mine, Golden Mile Mines, Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Kalgoorlie-Boulder Shire, Western Australia, Australia

The Great Boulder Mine was the first large scale mine on the Golden Mile, and considered the largest and richest on the field.

The town of Boulder (as in Kalgoorlie-Boulder) was named after the mine.

Visitors to the underground workings in the early part of the Twentieth Century wrote in amazement at seeing ore shoots loaded with fine grained gold. One writer wrote the battery was barely keeping up with gold being processed from the access tunnels, let alone the ore shoots. In 1929 the mine had extracted the most gold of any location in Western Australia. In 1940 it was noted as the second largest producer to that point in Australia.

The discovery of gold at Hannans, just north of the Golden Mile, led to the greatest gold-rush in Australia’s history. After only a couple of years of frenzied activity, by thousands of individual miners, the alluvial gold had been exhausted.

British speculators successfully floated the Great Boulder and Lakeview Mines in 1895 to access the rich underground reefs. The Great Boulder Gold Mines Limited was formed at this time, until it ceased as a company in 1972. …

Between 1895-1931 over four million tonnes of ore was processed for almost the same amount in ounces of gold. Dividends amounted to 3524% of the initial capital invested. The company had produced 15 million pounds of gold monetary wise, and 7.5 million pounds in profits.

Text from “Great Boulder Gold Mine,” on the mindat.org website [Online] Cited 29/10/2019

 

"Fremantle," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Fremantle,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Interior Courtyard, Old Gaol," Fremantle, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Interior Courtyard, Old Gaol,” Fremantle, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Fremantle Prison

Fremantle Prison, sometimes referred to as Fremantle Gaol or Fremantle Jail, is a former Australian prison and World Heritage Site in Fremantle, Western Australia. The six-hectare (15-acre) site includes the prison cellblocks, gatehouse, perimeter walls, cottages, and tunnels. It was initially used for convicts transported from Britain, but was transferred to the colonial government in 1886 for use for locally-sentenced prisoners. Royal Commissions were held in 1898 and 1911, and instigated some reform to the prison system, but significant changes did not begin until the 1960s.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

"Geraldton, W.A.," in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Geraldton, W.A.,” in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Geraldton

Geraldton is a coastal city in the Mid West region of the Australian state of Western Australia, 424 kilometres (263 mi) north of the state capital, Perth.

 

"Oldest Inhabitant (Henry Desmond.)," Geraldton, W.A. 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Oldest Inhabitant (Henry Desmond.),” Geraldton, W.A. 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Shark's Bay, W.A.," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Shark’s Bay, W.A.,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Pearling interests? Investments? in Western Australia (Information from Douglas Stewart Fine Books)

 

Shark Bay

Shark Bay is a World Heritage Site in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. The 23,000-square-kilometre (8,900 sq mi) area is located approximately 800 kilometres (500 mi) north of Perth, on the westernmost point of the Australian continent.

 

"The only street (Entirely paved of Mother of Pearl)," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“The only street (Entirely paved of Mother of Pearl),” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Shark's Bay," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Shark’s Bay,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"White's Cemetery," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“White’s Cemetery,” Shark’s Bay, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Grave in Nigger's Cemetery," Shark's Bay, 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Grave in Nigger’s Cemetery,” Shark’s Bay, 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"Shark's Bay," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Shark’s Bay,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Gin

Gin is the term for an Aboriginal woman. It is racist, the derogatory saying most people would be familiar with is “looks like a gin’s camp”, meaning they think the place is dirty/untidy.

 

"Shark's Bay," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“Shark’s Bay,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

"All Mother-of-Pearl," 1923 in John "Jack" Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

“All Mother-of-Pearl,” 1923 in John “Jack” Riverstone Faviell 1922-1933 photo album

 

 

Douglas Stewart Fine Books
720 High Street
Armadale VIC 3143
Australia
Phone: +61 3 9066 0200
info@douglasstewart.com.au

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09
May
21

Review: ‘Do Brumbies Dream in Red? – Tom Goldner’ at the Meat Market Stables, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 5th February – 27th February 2021

Photography & Curation/Art Direction – Tom Goldner
Moving Image – Angus Scott
Sound – Sean Kenihan
Poetry – Dr Judith Crispin (publication)
Colourist – CJ Dobson (moving image)
Audio Visual – Toto Creative
Cover Art – Katherina Rodrigues (publication)

 

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

 

Strange Beauty

Bloated prostrate tentacles

wither into our idea of dying

overlapping human, shit

feeding foulest vegetables,

regenerating sourly

Kingdoms of foulest water

regorging sourly

Bloated brumbies, winged coal

rejigs

Strange Beauty

Floating in our mind

In grey greasy horror water

Full of surprises –

like a holocaust holding pond

At your peril

 

Skull twisted,

Served on corrugated soot

Land, once precious

disguised, drained

black, gold – split

burnt to reburn

charred brumbies, flying coal

rem/embers,

Millions of worst worst

Strange Beauty

lost as sources

Boiling, bubbling – like a holocaust

At your peril

 

Belching wishes to reassemble

Hexing new forms

Bottom of our nightmare

Bottom of our innings

Animals worst worst

Plants unredeemable

Satan not lucifer

Sky a trap

Wings a trap

Escape a trap

Strange Beauty

beside the dead and ugly

like a holocaust

Do you want to …

(At your peril)

… Remember ?

.
Marcus Bunyan and Ian Lobb, May 2021

 

 

Contested Ground

I saw this darkly mysterious, immersive exhibition by the artist Tom Goldner just after Melbourne suffered its mini-five day COVID lock down in February 2021, but I have been awaiting the installation photographs and video of the event to publish this posting.

This stimulating exhibition, with its wonderfully atmospheric sound track, was an overlapping animation of conceptual, documentary photographs that appear in Goldner’s book Do Brumbies Dream in Red? – and placed “the audience within the Snowy Mountains and Victorian Alpine regions during the period of 2019-2020 referred to as the Black Summer“, the project (both multimedia exhibition and book) considering “the systems which position the Snowy Mountain brumby and the catastrophic 2019-2020 Australian bushfires within a time of ecological uncertainty.” The starting point into Goldner’s investigation was that of the Snowy Mountain brumby, an Australian feral wild-roaming horse, an invasive, non-native species introduced during colonisation. The brumbies cannot see in red, and the artist wondered how the world must have appeared to them illuminated by the strange light of the raging bushfires. He uses this idea as a metonym throughout the project which acts as an entry point into both the human and nonhuman world, to begin to understand the human perception of this catastrophic event and the anthropogenic changes that are happening in the Australian landscape.

The research which underpins Goldner’s project is guided “by the work of English professor Timothy Morton and his theories on ‘ecological awareness’ in Dark Ecology (2016), which examine the intersection of places, scales and nonhuman interrelations. Running parallel to these ideas are those of American professor Donna Haraway’s most recent book, Staying with the Trouble (2016). Particularly her concept of the ‘Chthulucene’ that strives to capture a future in which all things in the world are connected, coexist and, in many cases, ‘collaborate’, and through this, we learn to ‘live and die well together’ and achieve a kind of ‘ongoingness’.” The artist seeks to flatten the hierarchy between human and nonhuman life by allowing us to recognise ourselves within the violence we inflict on the natural world during this human-assisted ecological disaster.

.
While the project professes to challenge the notion of clear and tidy boundaries in a time of ecological uncertainty, in reality it offers a particularly one-eyed perspective on the subject of anthropogenic changes to the landscape. I don’t mind this perspective at all, in fact I applaud it, for the ultimate goal of the photographs is to open our eyes to the destruction that human actions are inflicting on our environment. Through beautifully modulated photographs of great sensitivity Goldner pictures these spaces of destruction and re/generation. But is there ever an “original” landscape to which we must return?

In humans, a reduced sensitivity to red light due to missing or defective L-cones (or long wave cones) is known as protanopia or protanomaly. The derivation of the word protanopia is from the early 20th century: from proto- ‘original’ (red being regarded as the first component of colour vision) + an- ‘lacking’ + ‘opia’- (denoting a visual disorder). Protanomaly makes red look more green and less bright while protanopia makes you unable to tell the difference between red and green at all. People with protanopia are more likely to confuse black with many shades of red; dark brown with dark green, dark orange and dark red; some blues with some reds, purples and dark pinks; and mid-greens with some oranges (see image below).

When the first component of colour vision (red) is lacking we have a visual disorder. How, then, can we see the intersection of the human and non-human world clearly if we have a visual disorder? To what are we to return, to an untouched paradisiacal landscape pre-colonisation, pre-human inhabitation – to an “original” we can no longer see – or do we acknowledge the paradoxical “nature” of our contemporary existence on this earth in a more balanced way. Nothing is ever black and white, or in this case colour(–).1

For many generations humans have lived in the Snowy Mountains and Victorian Alpine regions, singing pastorals to the gods, seeking guidance to live on the land: the mountain ranges are thought to have had Aboriginal occupation for 20,000 years and after the areas were first explored by Europeans from the 1830s-1850s, high country stockmen followed using the mountains for grazing during the summer months (Wikipedia). Over the last few years, people of Victoria’s high country and animal lovers have rallied against the proposed culling of feral brumbies in the state’s national parks. They cite that brumbies hold “heritage value, they are part of our cultural and social history. Brumbies have lived in our Heritage National Parks for two centuries; are descendants of remounts that were sent to War with our soldiers… Brumbies were immortalised by Banjo Patterson, feature in paintings by Sydney Nolan and written about in the Silvery Brumby novels by Ellyne Mitchell. Brumbies are part of the fabric of our Australian society. It is undeniable that extremist elements must not be allowed to dictate on cultural and social values.”2 Goldner states that, “Brumbies are a symbol of national consciousness. While they may be labelled as a ‘feral species’ and a threat to native ecosystems by environmentalists, they are also valued as an important part of Australia’s history as a symbol of national spirit.”

Contested ground indeed, and perhaps one that needed to be more fully investigated in Goldner’s project.

While the second sentence in the above paragraph is true I would argue that the opposite of the first sentence is at least possible – that brumbies are an anti-symbol of national consciousness, for the animals hardly ever impinge on the collective consciousness of most Australians when they think about the Australian landscape. How often would the vast bulk of the city-dwelling Australian population think about the brumby as a symbol of national consciousness? Hardly ever would be my answer. It is not an original thought about the landscape that they would have.

.
Walking through the darkened spaces of the exhibition, I let the phenomena of superb images and sounds wash over me. The experience was particularly moving given the strange beauty of the limited colour palette images and the atmospheric vibrations of the music. For me, the key image of the exhibition was not that of the bloated brumby lying prostrate on the blackened earth, but that of an isolated grave standing erect in the scorched landscape. With no context to allow the viewer to anchor this grave to a historical past, all we are left with are questions and metaphors. What is this grave doing seemingly in the middle of nowhere? Who is the person buried there? The metaphors are rich indeed: the erect whiteness of the white man’s grave stone isolated against the black ness of the landscape, a landscape not their own, and perhaps not of their own making. The anonymous writing on the grave stone standing as a metaphor for any human who has ever lived. The iron fence that segregates the human from the land even as they buried in it… as though they are a part of this earth but apart from it. A masterful image if ever I saw one.

In the overlapping, interstitial, spatio-temporal dimensions of the gallery I placed myself into the existence of these works, into their networks of existence. As the artist wanted, I recognised “the violence we inflict on the natural world during this human-assisted ecological disaster” but not, I insist, through the flattening of the hierarchy between human and nonhuman life but through it’s very opposite – through an acknowledgement of the multiple, fragmented, lexias of existence,2 networks that live in multiple levels of intersectionality, like a spiders web created in the dimensions of extended space. Into this geometry of space, into the spatio-temporal ‘nature’ of photography – death, power, transcendence, timelines, delay, exposure, territorialisations, assemblage, bricolage, rhizomic structures and the author – “seeing is no longer framed or presupposed through relations of distance or perspective. Rather, the eye and the visible are embodied as they struggle with positionality, in the physical, mental, and emotional conflicts that result when you have to take responsibility for what you see, instead of conferring that responsibility on an-other.”4

Goldner’s vision embodies this ongoing thickness, this ongoing responsibility.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

Footnotes

  1. “Conceptually, wholes are divided up or taken apart, dis-integrated into component pieces. They may be reintegrated, but in a way that reflects the understanding of those pieces at the time of their disassembly; the way the functions of individual parts of a whole are seen depends on the way the whole is divided into parts. Different visions result in different views of the whole.”
    Wolf, Mark. Abstracting Reality: Art, Communication, and Cognition in the Digital Age. Lanham: University Press of America, 2000, p. 196.
  2. Anonymous author. “Melbourne rally “Stop the bullets”,” media release on the Australian Brumby Alliance website May 1, 2021 [Online] Cited 09/05/2021.
  3. Lexia is perhaps the most widely applicable term for describing the linked pieces of information within a hypertext, referred to in various contexts as nodes, pages, frames and workspaces.
  4. Burnett, Ron. Cultures of Vision: Images, Media, & the Imaginary. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995, pp. 137-138.

.
Many thankx to Tom Goldner for allowing me to publish the photographs and video in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image. The Do Brumbies Dream in Red? – Photo Book is available from Tom Goldner’s website.

 

 

protanopia vision

 

Protanopia vision

 

 

Photography & Curation/Art Direction – Tom Goldner
Moving Image – Angus Scott

 

 

Photography & Curation/Art Direction – Tom Goldner
Moving Image – Angus Scott

 

 

“A large portion of the project was made in the Snowy Mountain region of New South Wales.

During the first tip to the fire grounds in early January 2020 we came across a wild horse… It had died of a lung bleed while trying to escape the bushfires. I used the brumby as an entry point into Australia’s colonial history, proposing that the brumby is a manifestation of our collective actions.

I later learn that horses only see in blues and greens, and I wondered how the world must have appeared to them illuminated by that strange red light.

The project asks, can we too see the world differently?”

.
Tom Goldner on the Blackriver website [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

 

Do Brumbies Dream in Red? is a research-driven project which explores anthropogenic changes in the Australian landscape through the use of conceptual documentary photography. Presented as an immersive experience this collaborative project utilises large-scale projection to place the audience within the Snowy Mountains and Victorian Alpine regions during the period of 2019-2020 referred to as the Black Summer.

Do Brumbies Dream in Red? negotiates the human perception of this catastrophic event. This exhibition and publication reveals the bushfires and resulting damage through the eyes of another human-assisted ecological disaster, one of an invasive species: the Snowy Mountain Brumby.

The project considers the systems which position the Snowy Mountain brumby and the catastrophic 2019-2020 Australian bushfires within a time of ecological uncertainty. The Snowy Mountain brumby, an Australian feral wild-roaming horse, appears as a metonym throughout the project and acts as an entry point into both the human and nonhuman world.

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

Installation view of the exhibition 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner' 2021

 

Installation views of the exhibition Do Brumbies Dream In Red? – Tom Goldner 2021 at the Meat Market Stables, Melbourne

 

 

“Mixed-up times are overflowing with both pain and joy – with vastly unjust patterns of pain and joy, with unnecessary killing of ongoingness but also with necessary resurgence. The task is to make kin in lines of inventive connection as a practice of learning to live and die well with each other in a thick present. Our task is to make trouble, to stir up potent response to devastating events, as well as to settle troubled waters and rebuild quiet places.”

.
Donna Haraway, 2016

 

 

Do Brumbies Dream in Red? is a project driven by research which explores anthropogenic changes in the Australian landscape through the use of conceptual documentary photography, video and audio recordings.

The project considers the systems which position the Snowy Mountain brumby and the catastrophic 2019-2020 Australian bushfires within a time of ecological uncertainty. The Snowy Mountain brumby, an Australian feral wild-roaming horse, appears as a metonym throughout the project and acts as an entry point into both the human and nonhuman world.

Brumbies are a symbol of national consciousness. While they may be labelled as a ‘feral species’ and a threat to native ecosystems by environmentalists, they are also valued as an important part of Australia’s history as a symbol of national spirit. Brumbies represent wildness and the way we relate to, and attempt to control, nature.

The project challenges the notion of clear and tidy boundaries in a time of ecological uncertainty. The research is underpinned by the work of English professor Timothy Morton and his theories on ‘ecological awareness’ in Dark Ecology (2016), which examine the intersection of places, scales and nonhuman interrelations. Running parallel to these ideas are those of American professor Donna Haraway’s most recent book, Staying with the Trouble (2016). Particularly her concept of the ‘Chthulucene’ that strives to capture a future in which all things in the world are connected, coexist and, in many cases, ‘collaborate’, and through this, we learn to ‘live and die well together’ and achieve a kind of ‘ongoingness’.

Do Brumbies Dream in Red? seeks to flatten the hierarchy between human and nonhuman life by allowing us to recognise ourselves within the violence we inflict on the natural world. The visual outcomes that navigate these ideas are intertwined and are driven by a series of photographs, moving images and audio recordings. The project culminates in a photobook with an accompanying poem by Australian artist and academic Dr Judith Nangala Crispin. The publication was produced to be presented alongside a mixed-media exhibition, comprising of large-format projected still and moving imagery and a soundscape.

Text from the Tom Goldner website [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

Tom Goldner. 'Untitled' from the series 'Do Brumbies Dream In Red?' 2020

 

Tom Goldner (Australian, b. 1984)
Untitled from the series Do Brumbies Dream In Red?
2020

 

'Do Brumbies Dream in Red? – Photo Book'

 

Do Brumbies Dream in Red? – Photo Book

 

 

Meat Market Stables
2 Wreckyn St, North Melbourne

Meat Market Stables website

Tom Goldner website

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09
Apr
21

Review: ‘Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’ at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 26th February  –  18th April 2021

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Equal pay demo, Bourke Street Melbourne' 1985

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Equal pay demo, Bourke Street Melbourne
1985
Pigment print from scanned negative
39 x 58cm (image size)
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

 

“One can also pursue politics with art.
Everything that intervenes in the processes of life, and transforms them, is politics.”

.
Hans Richter

 

“I always wanted to document people’s lives – their work, their family, their relationships, their leisure – their pain and pleasure.

“To me, every individual’s life is more wondrous than any fantasy could ever be.”

.
Ruth Maddison

 

 

The Art of a Fellow Traveller

Since the 1970s Australia has been blessed with many talented women photographers… Sue Ford, Carol Jerrems, Joyce Evans, Ponch Hawkes, Micky Allan, Ruth Maddison, Rosemary Laing, Hoda Afshar, Anne Ferran, Katrin Koenning, Robyn Stacey, Janina Green, Bindi Cole, Tracey Moffatt, Polixeni Papapetrou, Pat Brassington, Claire Rae, Claudia Terstappen, Jacqui Stockdale, Siri Hayes, Petrina Hicks, Kim Lawler, Carolyn Lewens, Nicola Loder, Jill Orr, Kim Percy, Patricia Piccinini, Elizabeth Gertsakis, Jane Brown, to name just a few…

 ** Thinking. Australia. For such a small (in population) and isolated (geographically) country, rarely in the history of photography can there have been such an accumulated wealth of talent within the space of 60 years or so. I have suggested to a major public gallery in Melbourne a group exhibition of these artists but it went nowhere. Why? This is world class talent! **

.
Which brings me to the exhibition Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times which occupies all galleries at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne.

What a delight it is to see this artist in full flight in this exceptionally strong exhibition. As pictured in the flow of images, Maddison has carved her name as a social documentary and feminist photographer, her holistic body of work providing a “significant contribution to the documentation of Australian life and society from the 1970s to the present – from her earliest iconic hand-coloured works, the working life of women, Melbourne’s social and cultural life of the 1980s, and Maddison’s documentation of the people and industries of her adopted home of Eden.”

Through direct, frontal mainly black and white / hand coloured photographs, Maddison builds compelling stories in her work, stories which explore the cultures and sub-cultures of Australia: the political upheavals, alternative lifestyles and counter culture, the women’s movement, gay liberation, Vietnam, union, nuclear, anti-fascist and other protests; the fight for equality and equal pay, the fight against discrimination and other actions that fight for fairness, acceptance and respect for all, within Australian society. With compassion and understanding Maddison pictures youth and exuberance, old age and protest, life on the land and sea, and life leaving it for the cities. Her photographs serve a testificatory function – related to BOTH a person who has witnessed these events (the artist) AND an object used as evidence (the photograph).

Maddison’s testimony to such events creates a polyperspectivity – not so much in terms of what the camera sees in individual images, but in what it sees directed by the artist over an entire career, comprising more than 40 years. Of looking, of being present, of being ethical. In her work, “the shadows already become immortal while still alive.”1

This is the crux of the matter. Since the very day that Maddison picked up a camera being ethical when representing the world around her has been a gut reaction. “Ethics is concerned with what is good for individuals and society and is also described as moral philosophy. The term is derived from the Greek word ethos which can mean custom, habit, character or disposition.” Her presentation of the world reflects her character and disposition. Her ethos is embedded in her being and psyche – the human soul, mind AND spirit. You can’t make this stuff up, you either have it or you don’t.

Maddison has this generosity of spirit in spades. The belief in balance, fairness, and equality for all. Yes, her photographs document people’s pleasure and pain, their lives, their existence but only through her own presence and vision. Her photographs are a reflection of her inner being, her spirit. What she believes the world can be, should be. It is this force of nature, her own being, that propels the investigation forwards. Never more so than now, in the midst of a pandemic, the world needs such ethical artists. To remind us for what we fight for.

For example, Netflix have recently announced a new “docu-soap” series “Byron Baes” (babes) to be filmed in the northern NSW beachside town of Byron Bay, which will reveal “hot Instagrammers, living their best lives, being their best selves,” with a cast of “celebrity-adjacent-adjacent influencers.” Who cares about these egotistical non-entities, when in the town drug use is rampant, housing is unaffordable and people cannot get a job! That is the real story, one which an artist such as Maddison would recognise and document with empathy and insight.

Maddison is a fellow traveller2 and I travel with her. She doesn’t follow “the running dog of capitalism” – or as people used to call them, “running dogs”3 – nipping at your heels, constantly harassing you, but these days not even that… just lackadaisical multinational corporations who don’t even care to hide their disdain for the working class, or their ecological disdain for the health of the world. All that matters is money and keeping the shareholders happy. She follows her own path and long may that continue. Looking and documenting is always both personal and political and this is Maddison’s story: “Everything that intervenes in the processes of life, and transforms them, is politics.” Blessings to her.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

  1. Joseph Roth, quoted, in translation, from Ulrich Raulff. “Umbrische Figuren,” in Floris M. Neusüss. Fotogramme – die lichtreichen Schatten. Kassel 1983, p. 16.
  2. A person who travels with another; a person who is not a member of a particular group or political party … but who sympathises with the group’s aims and policies.
  3. A servile follower, especially of a political system.

.
Many thankx to the Centre for Contemporary Photography for allowing me to publish the installation photographs at the bottom of the posting. All other iPhone photographs by Marcus Bunyan. Please click on the photographs to view a larger version of the image.

 

 

Gallery One

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'First roll of film' 1976 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
From First roll of film (installation view)
1976
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'First roll of film' 1976 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
From First roll of film (installation view)
1976
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'First roll of film' 1976

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
From First roll of film (installation view)
1976
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing at left the series Christmas Holidays with Bob’s Family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland (1979)
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing the series Christmas Holidays with Bob’s Family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland (1979)
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (born Australia 1945) 'No title (Woman collecting a Christmas present from the car)' 1977-78

 

Ruth Maddison (Australia, b. 1945)
No title (Woman collecting a Christmas present from the car)
1977-78
From the series Christmas Holidays with Bob’s Family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland 1979

 

Ruth Maddison. 'Christmas holiday with Bob's family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland' 1977/78

 

Ruth Maddison (Australia, b. 1945)
From Christmas Holidays with Bob’s family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland
1979

 

Ruth Maddison (Australia, b. 1945) 'Christmas Holidays with Bob's family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland' 1979

 

Ruth Maddison (Australia, b. 1945)
From Christmas Holidays with Bob’s family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland
1979

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the series Christmas Holidays with Bob’s family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland (1979) from the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Untitled #18' 1979

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Untitled #18
1979
From the series Christmas holidays with Bob’s family. Mermaid Beach, Queensland 1979
Pigment print from scan, edition 1/1
10.5 x 16.2cm
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing photographs of women workers and single mothers (various dates and series, see above)
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing images from the series And so we joined the Union (1985)
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Prison Officers, Pentridge' 1985

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Prison Officers, Pentridge
1985
Pigment print from scanned negative (Print by Les Walkling)
50 x 50cm (image size)
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) From the series 'Let's Dance' 1979

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) From the series 'Let's Dance' 1979

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
From the series Let’s Dance (installation views)
1979
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Ruth Maddison photographed the social spaces that had been important to activist communities but which were in the process of passing away. These were mainly commissioned projects for labour and social movements, otherwise these histories would have been lost.

Dancing and entertainment were features of Ruth Maddison’s work throughout the 1980s. These photographs reflected Maddison’s own social life, which often revolved around Melbourne’s pubs and nightclubs. But there was also a classical documentary function to her photographs of trade union dances and the annual women’s dance at St Kilda Town Hall. These pictures reflected social spaces that had been important to activist communities, but which by the mid-1980s were in the process of passing away; as women’s groups began to fragment, and as the membership of labour organisations changed. The photograph shown here of the Vehicle Builders’ Union Ball at Collingwood Town Hall were part of a commission. Like many photographers in this exhibition (including Helen Grace, Sandy Edwards and Ponch Hawkes), political affiliation and professional practice often came together in commissioned projects for labour and social movements.

Text from the Monash Gallery of Art website

 

Ruth Maddison. 'Vehicle Builders' Union Ball, Collingwood Town Hall, Melbourne' 1979

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Vehicle Builders’ Union Ball, Collingwood Town Hall, Melbourne
1979
Gelatin silver print

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Single Mothers and their Children' 1994

 

Installation view of a work from Ruth Maddison’s series Single Mothers and their Children 1994
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Mmaskepe Sejoe and her daughter Nthabelong. Botswana - Melbourne' 1997 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Mmaskepe Sejoe and her daughter Nthabelong. Botswana – Melbourne (installation view)
1997
From the series Australian Women
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Mary Marcoftsis. Macedonia - Melbourne' 1997 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Mary Marcoftsis. Macedonia – Melbourne (installation view)
1997
From the series Australian Women
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Nada Jankovic. Serbia - Buli, NSW' 1997 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Nada Jankovic. Serbia – Buli, NSW (installation view)
1997
From the series Australian Women
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Lia Tata Ruga, Devi Hamid, Anna Dartania and Ita Sulis. Indonesia – Sydney' (installation view) 1997

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Lia Tata Ruga, Devi Hamid, Anna Dartania and Ita Sulis. Indonesia – Sydney (installation view)
1997
From the series Australian Women
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Trade workshop for girls, Preston TAFE' 1984 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Trade workshop for girls, Preston TAFE (installation view)
1984, printed 2020
Pigment print from scanned negative
18.6 x 28cm
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Trade workshop for girls, Preston TAFE 1984' (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Trade workshop for girls, Preston TAFE (installation view)
1984, printed 2020
Pigment print from scanned negative
18.6 x 28cm
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Women's Dance, St Kilda Hall' 1985, printed 2014 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Women’s Dance, St Kilda Hall (installation view)
1985, printed 2014
Gelatin silver prints

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Ponch Hawkes, Helen and Alice Garner' 1978-2018

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Ponch Hawkes, Helen and Alice Garner
1978-2018
Pigment print from scanned negative
Image: 22.6 x 15cm
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Jane Clifton and Helen Garner' 1976-2013 (installation view)

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Jane Clifton and Helen Garner' 1976-2013 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Jane Clifton and Helen Garner (installation views)
1976-2013
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view in gallery one of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing at second top left, Keith Haring (1985-2014)
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Keith Haring' 1985-2014

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Keith Haring
1985-2014
Pigment print from scanned negative, hand-coloured and digitally enhanced
40 x 40cm
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Monika Behrem, Rochelle Haley and their baby Indigo' 2017 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Monika Behrem, Rochelle Haley and their baby Indigo (installation view)
2017
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Equal pay demo, Bourke Street Melbourne' 1985 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Equal pay demo, Bourke Street Melbourne (installation view)
1985
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Gallery two

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery two of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Highway 23' 2009 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Highway 23 (installation view)
2009
Type C print from digital file
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views showing work from the series Crossing the Monaro (2009) in the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

In Ruth Maddison’s regular trips across the Monaro she stopped frequently to take photographs. She is drawn to the expansiveness of this unencumbered landscape, the way it opens up and seems to encourage something similar in ourselves.

“I drive across the Monaro and look at the sweep of the land and think about what was there and what has gone – time and time again. Stopping at small cemeteries scattered across the Monaro, passing through the dying towns, collecting bird and animal bones scattered all along the way, watching grass seeds blowing across the road. I am conscious of layers of history held beneath the surface of the land. …

History is writ large on this route. Small towns attest to times of brief plenty: the promise of gold, the economy of fleece. They are established at distances determined in an era when horses paced the daily work. Where rail provided a short-lived reprise. They are now towns that compete for use to “Stop Revive Survive” or to which some retire…

This new body of work is a departure from the people-focused documentary / portrait based work that has informed my public practice for 30 years. This departure is the outcome of my social and professional isolation [in Eden], which I sought and have embraced. Yet I consider this work a documentary piece – I am documenting the passage of my life through a place and a time via photography and the problem solving processes it presents to me. I am documenting what it is that makes me want to go on and on with the work.”

Ruth Maddison artist statements 2008-09 quoted in Merryn Gates. “There is a time,” (catalogue essay) from the exhibition There is a time at the Huw Davies Gallery, September 2009 [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view in gallery two of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Millsy (Jason Mills)' 2000-2002 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Millsy (Jason Mills) (installation view)
2000-2002
From the series Now a river went out of Eden
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Bounge (Gregory Curtis) and Apple (John McCrory)' 2000-2002 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Bounge (Gregory Curtis) and Apple (John McCrory) (installation view)
2000-2002
From the series Now a river went out of Eden
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Norm Joiner' 2000-2002 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Norm Joiner (installation view)
2000-2002
From the series Now a river went out of Eden
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Imlay Street, Eden 1.44 pm 31 December 2019' and 'Walking towards Aslings Beach 7.14 am 31 December 2019' 2019 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Imlay Street, Eden 1.44 pm 31 December 2019 (installation view)
Walking towards Aslings Beach 7.14 am 31 December 2019
2019
From the series When No Birds Sing 2020
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Volunteers sorting. At the Fishermen's Co-op, Eden. 3.06 pm 18 January 2020' 2020 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Volunteers sorting. At the Fishermen’s Co-op, Eden. 3.06 pm 18 January 2020 (installation view)
2020
From the series When No Birds Sing 2020
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Julie Ristanovic, canteen supervisor. Chip mill' Nd (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Julie Ristanovic, canteen supervisor. Chip mill (installation view)
Nd
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Gallery three

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints

 

Fifty-one selected posters, from the Samuel Goldbloom Collection, Melbourne University Archives, pigment prints
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery three of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing on the television The Dustbins of History (1950s / 2020), edited from ASIO footage sourced from the National Archives of Australia
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

The Dustbins of History (1950s), edited from Asio footage sourced from the National Archives of Australia.

 

Still from The Dustbins of History (1950s / 2020), edited from ASIO footage sourced from the National Archives of Australia

 

 

She [Maddison] also discovered reels of surveillance film documenting suspected members of the Communist party as they arrived at a secret meeting in one of Melbourne’s laneways in the 50s. This footage appears in the exhibition as The Dustbins of History, a short film that is comedic in its ambiguity and monotony. All that’s missing is the Keystone Cops.

Alison Stieven-Taylor. “The communist who raised me: photographer Ruth Maddison interrogates her father’s Asio file,” on the Guardian website Thurs 25 February 2021 [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery three of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery three of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne showing works from the series My father’s footsteps (1942-2020)
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'To everything there is a turn, turn, turn' 2020

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
To everything there is a turn, turn, turn
2020
From the series My father’s footsteps (1942-2020)
Diptych
Pigment print from ASIO files

 

 

After decades of being denigrated in the press and parliament, in 1990 Goldbloom was awarded an OAM for his service as an activist for peace. Later, a street was named after him in Canberra. Maddison has paired an ASIO image of her father at a peace rally in 1965 with the Goldbloom street sign, evidence she says of “history doing the wheel again”.

Alison Stieven-Taylor. “The communist who raised me: photographer Ruth Maddison interrogates her father’s Asio file,” on the Guardian website Thurs 25 February 2021 [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view in gallery three of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Hiroshima Day, Melbourne' 1981/2020 (installation view)

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Hiroshima Day, Melbourne' 1981/2020 (installation view detail)

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Hiroshima Day, Melbourne' 1981/2020 (installation view detail)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Hiroshima Day, Melbourne (installation views)
1981/2020
Pigment print from scanned black and white negative. Hand coloured and digitally enhanced
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Herta and Jill Koppel

 

 

I just met the most wonderful lady at the Ruth Maddison exhibition at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne.

100 year old Herta Koppel (pictured with her daughter Jill) was as bright as a button. She escaped the Nazis from Vienna with her two sisters in 1939, a few weeks before the war, leaving behind her parents who did not make it.

In the gallery the family were reminiscing on the people they knew in Ruth’s photographs while ‘The Internationale’ played in the background. How fitting.

Marcus

Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Samuel Goldbloom. Four photographs by ASIO 1957/1965/1968/1970 archival pigments prints 2020 (installation view)

Samuel Goldbloom. Four photographs by ASIO 1957/1965/1968/1970 archival pigments prints 2020 (installation view)

 

Samuel Goldbloom. Four photographs by ASIO 1957/1965/1968/1970 archival pigments prints 2020 (installation view)
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) Sam self-portrait, self-redacted Nd (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Sam self-portrait, self-redacted (installation view)
Nd
Pigment print from scanned negative
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) Sam self-portrait, self-redacted Nd (installation view detail)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Sam self-portrait, self-redacted (installation view detail)
Nd
Pigment print from scanned negative
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery three of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Maddison's parents' Nd (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Maddison’s parents (installation view)
Nd
Pigment print from scanned black and white negative
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Last night I had the strangest dream (#1)' 2020 (installation view)

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Last night I had the strangest dream (#1) (installation view)
2020
Pigment print, hand coloured and digitally enhanced
64 x 70cm
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

From an early age, Ruth Maddison knew her father, Sam Goldbloom, was being watched. “He used to tell us not to worry about the men sitting in the car in front of the house … we were aware the clicks on the phone meant ‘they’ were listening too,” the award-winning Melbourne-born photographer says.

“They” were the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation. In the 1940s, Goldbloom’s anti-fascist ideals drew ASIO’s attention. He later joined the Communist party before becoming a major player in the World Peace Council. These associations made him a person of interest for more than 30 years. …

While the spy agency’s prolonged surveillance of her father was not news, Maddison says that when her mother, Rosa, died in 2008, she discovered a much more layered history. As she and her two sisters packed up the family home, Maddison was tasked with clearing out her father’s shed. He had died in 1999 but until then no one had gone through “Sam’s stuff”.

There she found packs of slides, video footage from Goldbloom’s numerous peace missions to communist regimes including the USSR, East Germany and Cuba, as well as home movies, correspondence and other paraphernalia related to his activist work. This discovery became the entry point to The Fellow Traveller, the centrepiece for the first major survey of Maddison’s work, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”.

She [Maddison] uses her camera to explore the influence of politics on everyday life, often focusing on the personal. In The Fellow Traveller she exposes the social and political climate of the postwar years through a very intimate and at times painful lens.

“For my father, politics was number one,” she says. “To see it all laid out in the ASIO files, you know, night after night after night Sam was at meetings, and then this year he’s overseas for one month, and then another year for two months, then three. While I was looking at all of that I realised family wasn’t number one for him.”

While Maddison was not witness to her father’s interactions with world leaders, she imagined him meeting men like Mao and Khrushchev. In a series, “Last night I had the strangest dream” Maddison has inserted Goldbloom into pictures with his political heroes [see Last night I had the strangest dream (#1) below].

“It’s not about reinterpreting history, I am playing with him and his life, and wondering if he ever daydreamed these images like I am now.” These hand-coloured photographs are also visual evidence of the fiction ASIO pursued.

Maddison describes her treatment of the archival materials as “part real, part desire and part imaginary”, which parallels the narrative in the ASIO files. In the endless reams of observational notes, innocuous photographs and informers’ statements lies the hope that Goldbloom was up to something.

After decades of being denigrated in the press and parliament, in 1990 Goldbloom was awarded an OAM for his service as an activist for peace. Later, a street was named after him in Canberra. Maddison has paired an ASIO image of her father at a peace rally in 1965 with the Goldbloom street sign, evidence she says of “history doing the wheel again”. [See the diptych To everything there is a turn, turn, turn 2020 above]

Alison Stieven-Taylor. “The communist who raised me: photographer Ruth Maddison interrogates her father’s Asio file,” on the Guardian website Thurs 25 February 2021 [Online] Cited 05/04/2021

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945) 'Last night I had the strangest dream (#1)' 2020

 

Ruth Maddison (Australian, b. 1945)
Last night I had the strangest dream (#1)
2020
Pigment print, hand coloured and digitally enhanced
64 x 70cm
Courtesy of the artist and the Centre for Contemporary Photography

 

 

 

Gallery four

 

Text from the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times' at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne

 

Installation views in gallery four of the exhibition Ruth Maddison It was the best of times, it was the worst of times at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times is a significant survey exhibition focusing on Maddison’s social documentary practice from 1976 to the current day. Bringing together key historical works with a major new commission, this exhibition is a timely and focused look at one of Australia’s leading feminist photographers.

The exhibition features several key series, from Maddison’s earliest hand-coloured works Miss Universe (1979); her iconic Christmas Holidays with Bob’s Family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland (1979); a selection of series focusing on women in the workforce (from 1979); The Beginning of Absence (1996) documenting her father’s mortality; photojournalistic works documenting political rallies and activism in Australia (1975-2015); to Maddison’s more recent projects documenting the people and industries of Eden, NSW (2002-2014).

These works are presented alongside Maddison’s documentation of the cultural milieu of Melbourne with a focus on the late 1970s and 1980s. Her portraits of Melbourne’s leading writers, artists, theatre makers and musicians include Helen Garner, Tracey Moffatt, Steven Cummings, Jenny Watson, Mickey Allen, Ponch Hawkes and the founders of Melbourne’s Circus Oz amongst others.

Maddison’s more recent projects documenting Eden’s people and industries illustrate the changing face of regional Australia and the societal pressures that have come to bear. The Eden teens captured in Maddison’s 2002 series have now splintered, with half leaving town for new opportunities and the other remaining. The two industries – fishing and timber – that have underpinned Eden’s economy for decades have been dramatically reduced. While the 2019 bushfires, followed by the COVID-19 pandemic have further economically ravaged a community trying to rebuild itself.

The newly commissioned work The Fellow Traveller (2020) is an immersive photographic installation exploring Maddison’s father’s radical political activities in Australia and overseas from the 1950s-1980s, which were under ASIO scrutiny. Combining archival material, footage and hand-coloured photographs among a sea of revealing and curious images, The Fellow Traveller presents the shifting nature of long held personal and historical truths at a time of increasing social and political urgency.

Delivered through the collaboration of Adam Harding CCP Director, Jack Willet CCP Curator, Ruth Maddison and independent Curator Olivia Poloni, with inceptive curatorial work from Linsey Gosper and Madé Spencer-Castle.

 

Biography

Ruth Maddison (b. Melbourne, 1945, lives and works in Eden) is one of Australia’s foremost senior feminist photographers. Best known for her hand-coloured series, Christmas Holidays with Bob’s Family, Mermaid Beach, Queensland (1977-78), for over 40 years Maddison has been exploring ideas surrounding relationships, working lives, and communities through portraiture and social documentary photography.

An entirely self-taught practitioner, Maddison shot her first roll of film in 1976 under the encouragement of longtime friend Ponch Hawkes, and has hardly put down a camera since. Maddison’s work is represented in major public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the National Library and the State Libraries of Victoria and New South Wales.

Text from the CCP website [Online] Cited 28/03/2021

 

Gallery one

Documentation photography J Forsyth

 

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

 

Gallery two

 

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

 

Gallery three

 

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

 

Gallery four

 

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

’Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’, installation view Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021. Documentation photography J Forsyth.

 

Ruth Maddison: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, installation views Centre for Contemporary Photography, 2021.
Documentation photography J Forsyth

 

 

Centre for Contemporary Photography
404 George St, Fitzroy
Victoria 3065, Australia
Phone: + 61 3 9417 1549

Opening hours:
Wednesday – Sunday 11am – 5pm

Centre for Contemporary Photography website

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04
Apr
21

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Orphans and small groups’ 1994-96 Part 2

April 2021

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Ma mère' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Ma mère
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Earlier in my life I believed that identity was always fluid, always in flux. These photographs reflect that belief.

Now as I get older, this belief has changed.

Identity is always steady – at a certain level – and that the old adage to know ones-self is still the greatest challenge. And that this knowledge brings a core that is consistent.

The fluidity of self-knowledge disappears when attention is sharpened.

.
Marcus Bunyan 2021

 

 

I am scanning my negatives made during the years 1991-1997 to preserve them in the form of an online archive as a process of active memory, so that the images are not lost forever. These photographs were images of my life and imagination at the time of their making, the ideas I was thinking about and the people and things that surrounded me.

All images © Marcus Bunyan. Please click the photographs for a larger version of the image. Please remember these are straight scans of the prints, all full frame, no cropping !

Marcus

*PLEASE NOTE THIS POSTING CONTAINS ART PHOTOGRAPHS OF MALE NUDITY – IF YOU DO NOT LIKE PLEASE DO NOT LOOK, FAIR WARNING HAS BEEN GIVEN*

Photographs are available from this series for purchase. As a guide, a vintage 8″ x 10″ silver gelatin print costs $700 plus tracked and insured shipping. For more information please see my store web page.

 

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled (Rembrandt thinking)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (Rembrandt thinking)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'The conversation' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
The conversation
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (Pope folded)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (Pope folded)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (Pope unfolded)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (Pope unfolded)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'The Angelus, New R, 1892' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
The Angelus, New R, 1892
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Thy Kingdom Come' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Thy Kingdom Come
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Purity' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Purity
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Whistler's mother (looking out to sea)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Whistler’s mother (looking out to sea)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Holbein's Happiness' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Holbein’s Happiness
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled (Sweet heart with leaves)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (Sweet heart with leaves)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Windows at 63aa' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Windows at 63aa
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Urban abstraction (for Max)' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Urban abstraction (for Max)
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Between the breath and the silence' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Between the breath and the silence
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Shame Fraser' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Shame Fraser
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Port Melbourne to Port of Melbourne' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Port Melbourne to Port of Melbourne
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Out back' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Out back
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (pear on black)' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (pear on black)
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Pear I' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Pear I
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Pear II' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Pear II
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract I' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract I
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract II' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract II
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Nude in sunlight' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Nude in sunlight
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract III' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract III
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract IIII' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract IIII
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract V' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract V
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Abstract VI' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Abstract VI
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Question  mark' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Question    mark
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Four lines and two trestles' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Four lines and two trestles
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Four tyres' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Four tyres
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (two cracks)' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (two cracks)
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (plank)' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (plank)
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creature)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creature)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creature)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creature)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creature)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creature)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creature)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creature)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creatures)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creatures)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled (creatures)' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled (creatures)
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Roundel I' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Roundel I
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Roundel II' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Roundel II
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Roundel III' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Roundel III
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Roundel IIII' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Roundel IIII
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'The structure and fabric of existence 1' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
The structure and fabric of existence 1
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Passionfruit²' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Passionfruit²
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Passionfruit²' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Passionfruit²
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'The structure and fabric of existence 2' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
The structure and fabric of existence 2
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Untitled' 1995

 

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Williamstown 1' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Williamstown 1
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Williamstown 2' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Williamstown 2
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Williamstown 3' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Williamstown 3
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Case Tractor – 1925 –' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Case Tractor – 1925 –
1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Fordson Tractor 1922' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Fordson Tractor 1922
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Hart Parr' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Hart Parr
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'John Deere Tractor c. 1925' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
John Deere Tractor c. 1925
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Lanz Bulldog Tractor 1930' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Lanz Bulldog Tractor 1930
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'McCormick Deering Tractor c. 1928' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
McCormick Deering Tractor c. 1928
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Fighter 1' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Fighter 1
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Fighter 2' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Fighter 2
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) '"Boomerang Way" Tocumwal Wishing Well' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
“Boomerang Way” Tocumwal Wishing Well
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) '"Boomerang Way" Tocumwal Wishing Well' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
“Boomerang Way” Tocumwal Wishing Well
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) '"Boomerang Way" Tocumwal Wishing Well' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
“Boomerang Way” Tocumwal Wishing Well
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'A twist of the mind' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
A twist of the mind
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'A twist of the mind' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
A twist of the mind
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'A twist of the mind' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
A twist of the mind
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Australian landscape' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Australian landscape
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Untitled' 1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Untitled
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Two men and a ute' 1994-95

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Two men and a ute
1994-95
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Plume (X marks the spot)' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Plume (X marks the spot)
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Lumbe, Blacksmith, Undertaker' 1995

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Lumbe, Blacksmith, Undertaker
1995
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Marcus Bunyan website

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26
Feb
21

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Orphans and small groups’ 1994-96 Part 1

February 2021

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Bamboo' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Tall Bamboo
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

 

I am scanning my negatives made during the years 1991-1997 to preserve them in the form of an online archive as a process of active memory, so that the images are not lost forever. These photographs were images of my life and imagination at the time of their making, the ideas I was thinking about and the people and things that surrounded me.

All images © Marcus Bunyan. Please click the photographs for a larger version of the image. Please remember these are just straight scans of the prints, all full frame, no cropping !

Marcus

Photographs are available from this series for purchase. As a guide, a vintage 8″ x 10″ silver gelatin print costs $700 plus tracked and insured shipping. For more information please see my store web page.

 

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Baby, Oslo' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Baby, Oslo
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Baby, Oslo' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Baby, Oslo
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Baby, Oslo' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Baby, Oslo
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Baby, Oslo' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Baby, Oslo
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Barrows' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Barrows
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Barrows' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Barrows
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Bellows' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Bellows
1994-1996
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Bonsai' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Bonsai
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Bricks and cups' 1994-1996

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Bricks and cups
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Cabbage' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Cabbage
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Children and flowers

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Children and flowers I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Children and flowers I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Children and flowers II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Children and flowers II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Children and flowers III' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Children and flowers III
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Children and flowers IIII' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Children and flowers IIII
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Corrugations

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Corrugations I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Corrugations I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Corrugations II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Corrugations II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Corrugations III' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Corrugations III
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Corrugations IIII' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Corrugations IIII
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Crazy paving' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Crazy paving
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Marguerite Daisy I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Marguerite Daisy I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Marguerite Daisy II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Marguerite Daisy II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Doll face I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Doll face I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Doll face II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Doll face II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Drainpipe I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Drainpipe I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Drainpipe II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Drainpipe II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Face I (William Klein)' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Face I (William Klein)
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Face II (William Klein)' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Face II (William Klein)
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Gate I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Gate I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Gate II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Gate II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Chalice I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Chalice I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Chalice II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Chalice II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Chalice III' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Chalice III
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Cracked' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Cracked
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Gumnuts' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Gumnuts
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Hat I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Hat I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Hat II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Hat II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Helicopter, flag pole and sun' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Helicopter, flag pole and sun
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'If?' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
If?
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Jubilee Street, Melbourne' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Jubilee Street, Melbourne
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Kids horse I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Kids horse I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Kids horse II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Kids horse II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Monster' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Monster
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Marquetry' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Marquetry
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Saint Gregory I' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Saint Gregory I
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Saint Gregory II' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Saint Gregory II
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Saint Gregory III' 1994-96

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Saint Gregory III
1994-96
Gelatin silver print

 

Melbourne gay pride 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Body painting, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Body painting, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Body painting, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Body painting, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Body painting, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Body painting, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Body painting, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Body painting, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'James Dean, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
James Dean, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Banquet table, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Banquet table, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Eagle brand, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Eagle brand, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Pentagram, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Pentagram, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Love, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Love, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Dragons wing, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Dragons wing, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958) 'Rose Kennedy, Melbourne gay pride' 1994

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Rose Kennedy, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, b. 1958)
Om, Melbourne gay pride
1994
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Marcus Bunyan website

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive

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