Posts Tagged ‘friendship

05
Apr
19

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: Mask, 1994

April 2019

*PLEASE NOTE THIS POSTING CONTAINS ART PHOTOGRAPHS OF MALE NUDITY – IF YOU DO NOT LIKE PLEASE DO NOT LOOK, FAIR WARNING HAS BEEN GIVEN*

 

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Dildo I)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Dildo I)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

 

This series of photographs is of my partner, my lover, my best friend and my muse for twelve and a half years. We had such fun with life, pushing the boundaries at every opportunity. It was a privilege to be able to photograph Paul in every situation that we thought about, to capture the creativity of spirit and being, of existence.

There are many photographs of this handsome, intelligent man that I took – a deep collaboration that I will never have again in my lifetime. The photographs that emerged from our relationship remind me of those that Alfred Stieglitz took of Georgia O’Keeffe – strong images based on trust and intimacy.

To Paul, I am proud of the photographs we took together and I am eternally grateful for our love, relationship and exploration of body, mind and spirit. Thank you.

Marcus

 

I am scanning my negatives made during the years 1991 – 1997 to preserve them in the form of an online archive as a process of active memory, so that the images are not lost forever. These photographs were images of my life and imagination at the time of their making, the ideas I was thinking about and the people and things that surrounded me.

All images © Marcus Bunyan. Please click the photographs for a larger version of the image. Please remember these are just straight scans of the prints, all full frame, no cropping !

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Mask' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Mask I
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Mask' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Mask II
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Horse bit)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Horse bit)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Boots)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Boots)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Balance I' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Balance I
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Mask' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Mask III
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Dildo II)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Dildo II)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Blind)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Blind)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Balance II' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Balance II
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Balance III' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Balance III
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Balance IV' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Balance IV
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Dildo III)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Dildo III)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Hands on hips)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Hands on hips)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Blind)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Blind)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Hands on hips)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Hands on hips)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Saliva I' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Saliva I
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Saliva II' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Saliva II
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Hands behind back)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Hands behind back)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Mask IV' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Mask IV
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

Marcus Bunyan. 'Paul (Boots and mask)' 1994 from the series 'Mask'

 

Marcus Bunyan (Australian, born England 1958)
Paul (Boots and mask)
1994
From the series Mask
Gelatin silver print

 

 

Marcus Bunyan website

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13
Jul
12

Exhibition: ‘Christer Strömholm: Les Amies de Place Blanche’ at the International Centre of Photography (ICP), New York

Exhibition dates: 18th May – 2nd September 2012

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It was then – and still is – about obtaining the freedom to choose one’s own life and identity.

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Christer Strömholm

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These are stunning photographs; they glow with an inner light and energy. With perfect composition and use of chiaroscuro the artist let’s the women speak for themselves – confident, self assured and happy in the life they are leading. Having come out as a gay man myself in 1975, six short years after the Stonewall Riots in New York, I can attest to how difficult and how much prejudice there was against gay men in the early 1970s. Imagine then, being a transexual living in Paris in the early to mid 1960s and the issues that these woman had to deal with.

And yet there is a joyous quality to these photographs, an intimate relationship between people (not just artist and subject), a sense of fondness, friendship and fraternity. There is an intimacy here that transcends documentation. The last photograph in the posting (Gina, 1963, below) is just this wonderful, happy photograph where you just can’t help smiling yourself. There is a lightness here that is at variance with Brassai’s heavy set Parisian nights, that is more sensitive to the subject than Diane Arbus’ thrusting camera and her depiction of transexuals.

As good as the quote by Strömholm is, it is not just the freedom to choose one’s own life and identity, it is the ability to make that choice an informed choice, where you can select from a variety of things, where your preference indicates that your choice is based on one’s values or predilections. Without being informed the decision you may make is not free; if you are uninformed you may be unaware. An informed choice is based upon a clear appreciation and understanding of the facts, implications, and future consequences of any action.

Despite the prejudice and pain these woman would have suffered living an everyday life in the 1960s they have made an informed choice. These are strong, courageous woman and their friend has captured their resolve beautifully.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

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Many thankx to the International Centre of Photography for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

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Christer Strömholm
Pepita
1963
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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 Christer Strömholm
“Little Christer”
1955
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Belinda
1967
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Soraya and Sonia
1962
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Jacky
1961
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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“Raising profound issues about identity, sexuality, and gender, Christer Strömholm: Les Amies de Place Blanche, on view at the International Center of Photography (1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street) May 18 – September 2, 2012, presents 40 photographs, historical publications, and ephemera documenting young transgender males in the heart of Paris’ red-light district in the 1960s.

Arriving in Paris in the late 1950s, Christer Strömholm (Stockholm, 1918 – 2002) settled in Place Blanche, home of the famous Moulin Rouge. There, he befriended and photographed young transsexuals – “ladies of the night”  – struggling to live as women and to raise money for sex-change operations. In General Charles de Gaulle’s ultra-conservative France, transvestites were outlaws, regularly abused and arrested by the police for being “men dressed as women outside the period of carnival.” Some of these women had tragic fates. Others, like “Nana” and “Jacky,” eventually fulfilled their destiny and led happy lives as women. Living alongside them for 10 years, Strömholm photographed his subjects in their hotel rooms, in bars, and in the streets of Paris.

“These intimate portraits and Brassaï-like lush night scenes form a magnificent, dark, and moving photo album, a vibrant tribute to these girls,” said ICP Curatorial Assistant Pauline Vermare, who organized the exhibition. These photographs were first published in Sweden in 1983, and the book Vännerna från Place Blanche (“The Girlfriends of Place Blanche”) – which will be reissued this year in French and English – quickly sold out, becoming a cult classic and solidifying Strömholm as one of the great photographers of the 20th century. The work for this exhibition is provided by the Strömholm Estate in Stockholm, the Marvelli Gallery in New York, and from the collection of Alice Zimet.

As Strömholm wrote in 1983: “These are images of people whose lives I shared and whom I think I understood. These are images of women – biologically born as men – that we call ‘transsexuals.’ As for me, I call them ‘my friends of Place Blanche.’ It was then – and still is – about obtaining the freedom to choose one’s own life and identity.”

Christer Strömholm is a lesser known artist, but may well be the father figure of Scandinavian photography. A prominent artist and winner of the prestigious Hasselblad Award in 1997, he was also an influential teacher and the mentor to some of today’s leading Swedish photographers including J.H. Engström, Anders Petersen, and Lars Tunbjörk. Highly revered in his native Sweden since the 1980s, he is still little known outside of Europe. This exhibition is the first presentation of Strömholm’s work in an American museum, and features his most powerful and acclaimed body of work.”

Press release from the International Centre of Photography website

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Christer Strömholm
Nana
1959
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Sonia, Hôtel Pierrots
1962
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Suzannah and Sylvia
1962
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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Christer Strömholm
Gina
1963
© Christer Strömholm/Strömholm Estate

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International Center of Photography
1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street
New York NY 10036
T: 212 857 0045

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Wednesday: 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
Thursday – Friday: 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Saturday – Sunday: 10.00 am – 6.00 pm
Closed: Mondays

International Center of Photography website

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08
Feb
09

Exhibition: ‘Villa Edur. Eduardo Sourrouille’ at Artium, Basque Centre-Museum of Contemporary Art

Exhibition dates: 17th January – 19th April 2009

 

Eduardo Sourrouille. 'Self-portrait with impetuous friend' 2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille
Self-portrait with impetuous friend
2008

 

 

Artium, Basque Centre-Museum of Contemporary Art, presents the exhibition Villa Edur. Eduardo Sourrouille (North Gallery, from January 17 to April 19), an intimate self-portrait of this Basque artist based on more than 170 photographs taken in recent years. Sourrouille (Basauri, Bizkaia, 1970) proposes a metaphorical visit to the private rooms of his life, from the most superficial to the most intimate, to explore all aspects of the relationship with others and with oneself. Based on three different series of technically exquisite photographs, the author displays a world in which affection and the need to love and to feel loved predominates, in which there are ever-present allusions to questions such as sexual identity, the demands of friendship and recognition of links with others.

Villa Edur, the title of the first major one-man show of the work of Eduardo Sourrouille in a Museum, is taken from the maternal home of Eduardo Sourrouille, “the first legacy I received from her, the most valuable of all her bequests: besides being a home, it is an ongoing project, a driving force in my life and a reflection of my artistic career.” As in a home, the exhibition allows the visitors to explore a number of different rooms, each more intimate than the previous one, in which the artist receives visitors, who are converted into a host and guests.

Thus, in the exhibition, as in his house, “the host receives his guests at the entrance, where newcomers have access to proof of all the visitors that preceded them.” And in this way, the visitor sees two different series of portraits in the first room, Of the folder, people who visited my house and Of the folder, people who visited my house: room for… In the first Gallery, the artist presents different portraits of couples, consisting of himself with the different people with whom he has had some kind of relationship, be this emotional, family, friendship or any other kind. In this case, the photographs come very close to studio portraits, with carefully prepared, static poses, with hardly any atrezzo.

Each of these photographs is matched in the exhibition with another belonging to the second gallery of images, in which Sourrouille repeats the figures but in this case with a more accentuated theatricality, with a set design that may make the spectator imagine anecdotes or stories that occur in the encounter. The room, dominated by a more than one hundred photographs, reveals an entire “network of relationships, in which friendship, affection, love, fascination, desire, etc. (sometimes mixed up), have a place. The number of people including his father and other relatives, a large number of friends, artists such as Miguel Ángel Gaüeca, Manu Arregui and Ignacio Goitia, have been present here and have left their mark, and as the entire exhibition is imbued with games and humour, fictional figures such as Doña Rogelia are also included.

From this broad entrance, densely inhabited by figures “whose ghost lives on”, the artist invites first to step into his sitting room, the place in his house that “offers a precise image of what its owner is and would like to be.” In this space, Eduardo Sourrouille presents thirty self-portraits that “show of the people who have coexisted in me” and who “embody in the symbolic manner the different aspects of love and friendship, that can be found in me, as in any other individual.” With this aim in mind, Sourrouille presents in this exhibition space the Selfportrait with a friend series, thirty images in which the artist photographs himself with different animals, ironic portraits in which the human being appears to adopt certain characteristics of the animal.

There remain two more rooms in this house, the most private of all, where “intimate secret processes” take place. Sourrouille once again portrays himself with his father in the environment where the legacy is transmitted by means of simple rites, before going on to “the most secret room of all (…) in which the intimate world of each person is developed, in other words, what one does not necessarily confess but what one, nevertheless, has decided to experience.” Here, the spectator confronts a video entitled If you could see him through my eyes, in which the sheets are lowered slowly to discover the artist accompanied by two wild boar.

Text from Artdailly.org website

 

Eduardo Sourrouille. Villa Edur from Artium

 

Eduardo Sourrouille. 'Salon para Gaydjteam' 2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille
Salon para Gaydjteam
2008

 

 

“The house I depict in Villa Edur is my home, as it was (is) my mother’s home. It is the first legacy I received from her, the most valuable of all her bequests: besides being a home, it is an ongoing project, the driving force in my life and a reflection of my artistic career.

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In my house, the host receives his guests at the entrance, where newcomers find proof of all the visitors that preceded them. Everything takes place in this zealously staged space, and so each decorative element is selected with the very same care. Objects, costumes and scenery make up, both individually and jointly, a system of symbols alluding to the nature of its own contents.

One by one, the portrait of the person in question confronts his situation within the context that was created for him and which, at the same time, he himself contributed to defining, and whose ghost still lives on. Each portrait determines both a singular identity and the kind of relationship in which at least two individuals interact and this, in turn, is the reflection of a specific experience. Each relationship leaves a visible and definitive mark on the other, like the dent in an aluminium vessel, which reasserts the experience and provides solace (provisionally) as it is the proof of our materiality. The inescapable need to make these marks involves the creation of an entire network of relationships in which friendship, affection, love, fascination, desire, etc. (sometimes mixed up), have a place.

Next to the door, raised on her solid, light shelf, my mother observes us and invites us in.

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A door leads to the sitting room, a multifunctional and ultimately magical space, an environment in which everything that can be shown to visitors (plus part of what cannot be shown) is put on display. Definitively, the sitting room always offers a precise image of who its owner is and would like to be, of what he deliberately reveals to others and what he cannot prevent from being perceived through the cracks in his subconscious.

For this reason, the sitting room offers visitors a gallery of thirty self-portraits that show them the different people who coexist in me, what they can expect and the extent of the range of choices permitted. From a conceptual viewpoint and in a symbolic manner, these portraits embody different aspects of love and friendship that can be found in me, as in any other individual.

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Beyond the sitting room lie the private rooms in which intimate, secret processes take place, ceremonies that create individuals and subsequently shape them, mould them and endorse them for the world. In one of these, I share the space with my father because this room is where his offspring receive their legacy through atavistic and recurrent rites – so simple that they scarcely cause pain. In another room, I (at last) dare to make the call I have learnt, the one that I use to invoke the Other, even though in some ways the person I seek is myself. There is anguish and confusion in that call, but also the desire to establish constructive communication, as I also offer myself to the Other so that he might leave his mark on me.

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The intimate world of each person, in other words, what one does not necessarily confess but what one, nevertheless, has decided to experience, is developed in the most secret room of all. It is also the space reserved for the beauty that one finds by one’s own means – as it has not been revealed by any of one’s elders – and which therefore will be treasured as the exclusive property of its discoverer.

I live in Villa Edur because all the relationships that crystallise around me also reside there. Every individual harbours a space that he uses as a scenario to display his relationships, his family, lovers, friends, and for life, everything that is deposited with the passing of time, following the structure of his stage machinery. That is the space that is often called home.”

Ianko López Ortiz de Artiñano for Eduardo Sourrouille

Text from the Artium website

 

Eduardo Sourrouille. 'Panolis' 2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille
Panolis
2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille.' Double self-portrait' 2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille
Double self-portrait
2008

 

Eduardo Sourrouille. 'Self-portrait with a proud friend' 2008

Eduardo Sourrouille
Self-portrait with a proud friend
2008

 

 

Artium, Basque Centre-Museum of Contemporary Art
24 Francia Street. Vitoria-Gasteiz, 01002 Araba
Phone: 945 20 90 00

Opening hours:
Tuesday to Friday: 11.00 – 14.00 and
Mondays closed

Atrium website

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Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Mask’ 1994

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes the Art Blart blog which reviews exhibitions in Melbourne, Australia and posts exhibitions from around the world. He has a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne and is currently studying a Master of Art Curatorship at The University of Melbourne.

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