Posts Tagged ‘Poland

24
Jan
13

Exhibition: ‘WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath’ at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston – Posting Part 4

Exhibition dates: 11th November 2012 – 3rd February 2013

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Part 4 of the biggest posting on one exhibition that I have ever undertaken on Art Blart!

As befits the gravity of the subject matter this posting is so humongous that I have had to split it into 4 separate postings. This is how to research and stage a contemporary photography exhibition that fully explores its theme. The curators reviewed more than one million photographs in 17 countries, locating pictures in archives, military libraries, museums, private collections, historical societies and news agencies; in the personal files of photographers and service personnel; and at two annual photojournalism festivals producing an exhibition that features 26 sections (an inspired and thoughtful selection) that includes nearly 500 objects that illuminate all aspects of WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY.

I have spent hours researching and finding photographs on the Internet to support the posting. It has been a great learning experience and my admiration for photographers of all types has increased. I have discovered the photographs and stories of new image makers that I did not know and some enlightenment along the way. I despise war, I detest the state and the military that propagate it and I surely hate the power, the money and the ethics of big business that support such a disciplinarian structure for their own ends. I hope you meditate on the images in this monster posting, an exhibition on a subject matter that should be consigned to the history books of human evolution.

**Please be aware that there are graphic photographs in all of these postings.** Part 1Part 2Part 3

Marcus

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Many thankx to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston for allowing me to publish some of the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

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25. Photographs in the “Memorials” section range from the tomb of an unknown World War I soldier in England, by Horace Nicholls; and a landscape of black German crosses throughout a World War II burial site, by Bertrand Carrière; to an anonymous photograph of a reunion scene in Gettysburg of the opposing sides in the Civil War; and Joel Sternfeld’s picture of a woman and her daughter at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC, in 1986. (8 images)

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Horace Nicholls. 'The Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey, London, November 1920' 1920

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Horace Nicholls
The Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey, London, November 1920
1920
Silver gelatin print
© IWM (Q 31514)

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In order to commemorate the many soldiers with no known grave, it was decided to bury an ‘Unknown Warrior’ with all due ceremony in Westminster Abbey on Armistice Day in 1920. The photograph shows the coffin resting on a cloth in the nave of Westminster Abbey before the ceremony at the Cenotaph and its final burial.

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Anon. 'Under blue & gray - Gettysburg' July 1913

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Anon
Under blue & gray – Gettysburg
July 1913
Photo shows the Gettysburg Reunion (the Great Reunion) of July 1913, which commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

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Bertrand Carrière. 'Untitled' 2005-2009

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Bertrand Carrière
Untitled
2005-2009
from the series Lieux Mêmes [Same Places]

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Joel Sternfeld American (born 1944) 'Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C.,' May 1986

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Joel Sternfeld American (born 1944)
Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C.,
May 1986
Chromogenic print, ed. #1/25 (printed October 1986)
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Target Collection of American Photography, gift of the artist
© 1986 Joel Sternfeld

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26. The last gallery in the exhibition is “Remembrance.” Most of these images were taken by artists seeking to come to terms with a conflict after fighting had ceased. Included are Richard Avedon’s picture of a Vietnamese napalm victim; a survivor of a machete attack in a Rwandan death camp, by James Nachtwey; a 1986 portrait of a hero who rescued Jews during the Holocaust, by Houston native Gay Block; and Suzanne Opton’s 2004 portrait of a soldier who survived the Iraq War and returned to the United States to work as a police officer, only to be murdered on duty by a fellow veteran. The final wall features photographs by Simon Norfolk of sunrises at the five D-Day beaches in 2004. The only reference to war is the title of the series: The Normandy Beaches: We Are Making a New World(33 images)

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Richard Avedon. 'Napalm Victim #1, Saigon, South Vietnam, April 29, 1971' 1971

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Richard Avedon
Napalm Victim #1, Saigon, South Vietnam, April 29, 1971
1971
Silver gelatin print
© Richard Avedon

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Gay Block American, b.1942 'Zofia Baniecka, Poland' 1986

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Gay Block American, b.1942
Zofia Baniecka, Poland
1986
From the series Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust, a record of non-Jewish citizens from European countries who risked their lives helping to hide Jews from the Nazis
Chromogenic print, printed 1994
Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, gift of Clinton T. Wilour in honour of Eve France

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Zofia Baniecka (born 1917 in Warsaw – 1993) was a Polish member of the Resistance during World War II. In addition to relaying guns and other materials to resistance fighters, Baniecka and her mother rescued over 50 Jews in their home between 1941 and 1944.

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James Nachtwey. 'A Hutu man who did not support the genocide had been imprisoned in the concentration camp, was starved and attacked with machetes.  He managed to survive after he was freed and was placed in the care of the Red Cross, Rwanda, 1994' 1994

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James Nachtwey
A Hutu man who did not support the genocide had been imprisoned in the concentration camp, was starved and attacked with machetes. He managed to survive after he was freed and was placed in the care of the Red Cross, Rwanda, 1994
1994
Silver gelatin print
© James Nachtwey / TIME

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Simon Norfolk British (born Nigeria, 1963) 'Sword Beach' 2004

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Simon Norfolk British (born Nigeria, 1963)
Sword Beach
2004
from the series The Normandy Beaches: We Are Making a New World
Chromogenic print, ed. #1/10 (printed 2006)
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, gift of Bari and David Fishel, Brooke and Dan Feather and Hayley Herzstein in honor of Max Herzstein and a partial gift of the artist and Gallery Luisotti, Santa Monica
© Simon Norfolk / Gallery Luisotti

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Other photographs from the exhibition

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Matsumoto Eiichi Japanese, 1915-2004 'Shadow of a soldier remaining on the wooden wall of the Nagasaki military headquarters (Minami-Yamate machi, 4.5km from Ground Zero)' 1945

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Matsumoto Eiichi Japanese, 1915-2004
Shadow of a soldier remaining on the wooden wall of the Nagasaki military headquarters (Minami-Yamate machi, 4.5km from Ground Zero)
1945
Gelatin silver print
Collection of the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography
© Matsumoto Eiichi

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Gilles Caron French, 1939-1970 'Young Catholic demonstrator on Londonderry Wall, Northern Ireland' 1969

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Gilles Caron French, 1939-1970
Young Catholic demonstrator on Londonderry Wall, Northern Ireland
1969
Gelatin silver print
Courtesy of Foundation Gilles Caron and Contact Press Images
© Gilles Caron

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Alexander Gardner, American, 1821-1882- ‘The Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania’. Albumen paper print

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Alexander Gardner American, 1821-1882
The Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter / Dead Confederate soldier in the devil’s den, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
July 1863
Albumen paper print copied from glass, wet collodion negative
Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

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Ziv Koren Israeli, b.1970 'A sniper’s-eye view of Rafah, in the Southern Gaza strip, during an Israeli military sweep' 2006

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Ziv Koren Israeli, b.1970
A sniper’s-eye view of Rafah, in the Southern Gaza strip, during an Israeli military sweep
2006
Inkjet print, printed 2012
© Ziv Koren/Polaris Images

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David Leeson American, b.1957 'Death of a Soldier, Iraq' March 24, 2003

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David Leeson American, b.1957
Death of a Soldier, Iraq
March 24, 2003
Inkjet print, printed 2012
Courtesy of the artist

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August Sander German, 1876-1964 'Soldier' c. 1940

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August Sander German, 1876-1964
Soldier
c. 1940
Gelatin silver print, printed by Gunther Sander, 1960s
The MFAH, gift of John S. and Nancy Nolan Parsley in honour of the 65th birthday of Anne Wilkes Tucker
© Die Photographische Sammlung/SK StiftungKultur – August Sander Archiv, Cologne; DACS, London 2012

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Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
1001 Bissonnet Street
Houston, TX 77005

Opening hours:
Tuesday, Wednesday 10.00 am – 5.00 pm
Thursday 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
Friday, Saturday 10.00 am – 7.00 pm
Sunday 12.15 pm – 7.00 pm
Closed Monday, except Monday holidays
Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston website

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30
Sep
12

Exhibition: ‘Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective’ at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Exhibition dates: 29th June – 3rd October 2012

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“For outness is but the feeling of otherness (alterity) rendered intuitive, or alterity visually represented.”

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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In her most famous series, Beach Portraits (1992-2002), juveniles stare at the camera in a moment passif, caught by the camera between states – youth / adulthood, knowing / unknowing, Self / Other. Shot from a low perspective, lit by fill flash and with little contextual detail, the subjects exhibit – and I use the term advisedly – vulnerability, awkwardness (in the body and self), languidness of pose and bravuro self confidence that belies their beautiful alterity. These adolescents are not at one with themselves they are unsure of their place in the world. Dijkstra documents this uncertainty and enlarges it, blowing the photographs up to huge scale so that the viewer can examine every crevice of the persona in minute detail, their alterity visually represented.

Max Weintraub notes that Dijkstra has produced, “a set of carefully balanced compositions defined by the central, monumental presence of her youthful subjects. The classical simplicity of Dijkstra’s photographs focuses the viewer’s attention on the subtle particulars: the teens’ gawky, angular bodies, ill-fitting swimsuits and awkward postures… Her subjects hover somewhere between the receding past of their childhood and an unknown future. And while the identity of her subjects remain anonymous – each beach photograph is only identified by date and location – when viewed together a collective body emerges, one that stirs restlessly between the last physical and emotional trappings of youth and the social and psychological pressures of pending adulthood. The individuals depicted are so powerfully distinct that the effect of seeing these portraits en mass is symphonic, and the images begin to collectively hum with the sounds of the construction of self – its awkwardness, its uncertainty and above all, its heartbreakingly tender beauty.”

What a great piece of writing.

It is also interesting to observe that her own self portrait (Self Portrait, Marnixbad, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 19, 19911991, below) is only printed at 35 x 28 cm whereas images from the Beach Portraits are printed at 117 x 94 cm. Surrounded by ceiling, floor and wall tiles Dijkstra is enclosed, minute within the frame. The photographer recedes into the background, even more vulnerable and less “visible” than her monumental models of innocence. Other series continue the artist’s investigation into themes of time and change to greater or lesser effect. The Olivier series is a very powerful body of work that documents the loss of youthful innocence and the military socialisation of a young mind, evidenced by the look in Olivier’s eyes and the change in his outward appearance. As the press release states, “the Olivier series (2000-03) follows a young man from his enlistment with the French Foreign Legion through the years of his service, showing his both physical and psychological development into a soldier.”

“In contemporaneous works, including portraits of new mothers after giving birth, and photographs of bullfighters immediately after leaving the ring, Dijkstra sought subjects whose physical exhaustion diminished the likelihood of an artificed pose… Later, Dijkstra took portraits of new initiates to the Israeli army, photographing female soldiers in their uniforms after induction and then again in their civilian dress, as well as male soldiers directly after military exercises,” states the Guggenheim website.

Basically, this time line of change is a version of the old before and after shot, used throughout the history of photography – from the documentation of the changes in Dr Barnado’s children in the 1870s to the “scientific” use of photography to document the science of physical fitness and the commodification of the body in the ‘Before and After’ bodybuilding photographs from the 1930s, the 1950s and from the contemporary era.

To conclude, the strongest work is where the artist gives the photographs a greater depth of field and adds a narrative element by adding a background to the images. The work with contextless backgrounds is too derivative of say, Thomas Ruff, who I think does it better, more frontally, more confrontingly than Dijkstra does.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

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Many thankx to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

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Rineke Dijkstra
Coney Island, N.Y., USA, June 20, 1993

1993
Chromogenic print
117 x 94 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
Dubrovnik, Croatia, July 13, 1996
1996

Chromogenic print
117 x 94 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
Hilton Head Island, S.C., USA, June 24, 1992
1992

Chromogenic print
117 cm x 94 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
Kolobrzeg, Poland, July 26, 1992
1992
Chromogenic print
117 x 94 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Installation view of the Beach Portraits (1992-2002) series from the exhibition Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

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Rineke Dijkstra
Self Portrait, Marnixbad, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 19, 1991
1991

Chromogenic print
35 x 28 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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“From June 29 to October 3, 2012, the Guggenheim Museum will present Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective, an extensive midcareer survey and the first major exhibition of the artist’s work organized by a North American institution. It is the most comprehensive museum exhibition of the artist’s oeuvre to date. Dijkstra, born in Sittard, the Netherlands, in 1959, has developed an international reputation as one of the most highly regarded photographers of her generation. The exhibition will include representative examples from the most significant bodies of work she has created over the past twenty years.

Since the early 1990s, Rineke Dijkstra has produced a complex body of photographic and video work that offers a contemporary take on the genre of portraiture. Her large-scale color photographs of young, typically adolescent subjects recall 17th-century Dutch painting in their scale and visual acuity. The minimal contextual details present in her photographs and videos encourage us to focus on the exchange between photographer and subject and the relationship between viewer and viewed.

Dijkstra works in series, creating groups of photographs and videos around a specific typology or theme. In 1992, she started making portraits of adolescents posed on beaches from Hilton Head, South Carolina, to Poland and Ukraine. Shot from a low perspective, the subjects of the Beach Portraits (1992-2002), poised on the brink of adulthood, take on a monumental presence. In contemporaneous works, including portraits of new mothers after giving birth and photographs of bullfighters immediately after leaving the ring, Dijkstra sought subjects whose physical exhaustion diminished the likelihood of an artificial pose.

Dijkstra has also photographed individuals repeatedly over the course of several months or years. Her ongoing Almerisa series began in 1994 with a single photograph of a young Bosnian girl at a Dutch refugee center for asylum seekers and has grown as Dijkstra continued to photograph her regularly for more than a decade as she became a young woman with a child of her own. The outward signs of her transition into adulthood and her integration into mainstream Dutch culture reveal themselves incrementally over the course of many years. Similarly, the Olivier series (2000-03) follows a young man from his enlistment with the French Foreign Legion through the years of his service, showing his both physical and psychological development into a soldier. Later, Dijkstra took portraits of new initiates to the Israeli army, photographing female soldiers in their uniforms after induction and then again in their civilian dress, as well as male soldiers directly after military exercises.

For several years beginning in 1998, Dijkstra photographed young people, often in groups, posed in the lush landscapes of public parks. In contrast to the neutral backgrounds against which many of her subjects are pictured, the richness of the park settings lends these works a greater depth of field and adds a narrative element.

More recently, Dijkstra has built upon her revelatory work in video from the mid-1990s. In The Buzz Club, Liverpool, UK/Mystery World, Zaandam, NL (1996-97) and The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK (2009), Dijkstra filmed teenage habituées of local clubs dancing to their favorite music. Presented as multichannel video installations, these works showcase their subjects’ teen personas and methods of self-expression, revealed in how they style themselves and in the movements of their bodies. Two video works made in 2009 at Tate Liverpool expand the artist’s interest in the empathic exchange between photographer and subject to include the affective response to artworks. In I See a Woman Crying (Weeping Woman) (2009), a group of schoolchildren engage with art, discussing their perceptions of and reactions to a work by Pablo Picasso, while Ruth Drawing Picasso (2009) shows a girl pensively sketching a masterwork.”

Press release from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum website

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Rineke Dijkstra
Olivier, The French Foreign Legion, Camp Raffalli, Calvi, Corsica, June 18, 2001
2001

Chromogenic print
90 x 72 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Installation view of the Olivier (2000-03) series from the exhibition Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

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Rineke Dijkstra
Vila Franca de Xira, Portugal, May 8, 1994
1994
Chromogenic print
90 x 72 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
Amy, The Krazyhouse, Liverpool, England, December 22, 2008
2008

Archival inkjet print
96.5 x 75 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
The Buzz Club, Liverpool, England, March 3, 1995
1995

Chromogenic print
110 x 88.5 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Rineke Dijkstra
Omri, Givatti Brigade, Golan Heights, Israel, March 29, 2000
2000
Chromogenic print, 140 x 112.5 cm
Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris
© Rineke Dijkstra

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue (at 89th Street)
New York

Opening hours:
Monday – Wednesday, Friday 10 am – 5.45 pm
Saturday 10 am – 7.45 pm
Thursday closed

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum website

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02
Aug
09

Book: ‘Negatives Are To Be Stored’ photographs by Stefania Gurdowa 2008

2008

 

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

 

The presence of these photographs marks your consciousness indelibly, for the artist has made marks that cannot easily be removed.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

All images by Stefania Gurdowa from the series Negatives Are To Be Stored.
All images © Imago Mundi

Klisze przechowuje sie (Negatives are to be stored)
Photographs by Stefania Gurdowa
Text by Jerzy Lewczynski and Dariusz Czaja
Hardcover: 218 pages
22 x 28.5 cm

Publisher: Fundacja Imago Mundi / Muzeum Etnograficzne w Krakowie.
ISBN 978-83-925914-4-3

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' Nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' Nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' Nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

 

Eleven years ago, in the attic of a tenement house in the town of Debica, more than 1,000 damaged glass negative plates were discovered. Most of them depicted expressive portraits of anonymous individuals who lived in the neighbourhood during the 20s and 30s.

At first sight, we could guess hardly anything about the author of the plates, although her name appeared on them. But our deepening research shed light upon someone extraordinary for her time: an independent, gifted woman of consequence whose workshops existed far away from the grand cultural capitals, and whose art lay in taking orderly portraits of her neighbours: shopkeepers, craftsmen, peasants, priests and Jews.

Stefania Gurdowa (née Czerny) was born in Bochnia in 1888. Her father was the bandmaster of a salt-mine orchestra. She herself played the zither. She gained her photographic education in Bochnia, and then in Lwow (Lemberg). From 1921 to 1937 she ran her own photographic workshop in Debica (and established branches in Mielec and Ropczyce for a time). It was unusual for a woman to run a business like hers in this era, yet it appears Gurdowa also hired a number of employees – Feliks Adam Czelny among them, a man who found fame after 1945, when he published a documentary report on the ruined city of Wroclaw.

Stefania and Kazimierz Gurda divorced, and from her home in Debica, the photographer took only her daughter, Zosia – and the piano. In the late 30s she settled in Silesia. Under Nazi occupation her business was taken over by the Germans, and she found herself a paid worker in her own workshop.

After the end of the war, Zosia migrated to France. Stefania Gurdowa decided to stay in Poland, and once more she started all over again – this time in Lodygowice, near Zywiec. She took care of her granddaughter, Basia for some years, until the girl was reunited with her mother in France. And she established yet another photographic workshop. Her former clients remember that there were always fresh flowers in her chilly rented flat-and-atelier – as well as a permanent Christmas tree!

Gurdowa, the distinguished artist, died in 1968. Her apartment was cleaned after she passed away, and her immense photographic archive was disposed of and lost. Only a fragment of her art endures, together with a question without an answer: who hid a collection of glass plates behind a wall in the attic of her workshop in Debica? Perhaps it was her own decision to preserve them this way. As a responsible professional, she must have been aware of the rule that “negatives are to be stored.”

Agnieszka Sabor

Text from the Lens Culture website [Online] Cited 22/03/2019

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

Stefania Gurdowa. 'Untitled' Nd from the series 'Negatives Are To Be Stored'

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

 

Stefania Gurdowa (Polish, 1888-1968)
Untitled (anonymous individuals)
Nd
From the series Negatives Are To Be Stored
Glass plate negative

 

 

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08
Apr
09

Jeff Gusky photographs from the exhibition ‘Of Life and Loss: The Polish Photographs of Roman Vishniac and Jeffrey Gusky’ at the Detroit Institute of Arts

Exhibition dates: 15th April – 12th July, 2009

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Corridor in Kazimierz (Former Jewish District)' Cracow, Poland 1996

 

Jeff Gusky
Corridor in Kazimierz (Former Jewish District)
Cracow, Poland 1996

 

 

As promised photographs by Jeff Gusky from the exhibition Of Life and Loss: The Polish Photographs of Roman Vishniac and Jeffrey Gusky. Many thanks to Jeff for making them available to me. I have tried to form a small narrative from some of the photographs that Jeff sent me, like a piece of music. The flow through passageways and doorways forming rivers of light and dark ends in the ascending stairs that hold the possibility of deliverance and redemption. The image is reminiscent of photographs by Eugene Atget.

The most beautiful video and music (see below) is entirely appropriate for this post: Gorecki Symphony No. 3 “Sorrowful Songs” – Lento e Largo.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Former Jewish Home in Use as a Public Toilet' Dzialoszyce, Poland 1996

 

Jeff Gusky
Former Jewish Home in Use as a Public Toilet
Dzialoszyce, Poland 1996

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Desecrated Synagogue and Jewish School' Dzialoszyce, Poland 1999

 

Jeff Gusky
Desecrated Synagogue and Jewish School
Dzialoszyce, Poland 1999

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Lublin Corridor #1' Lublin, Poland 1999

 

Jeff Gusky
Lublin Corridor #1
Lublin, Poland 1999

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Birkenau Silhouette' Auschwitz, Poland 1996

 

Jeff Gusky
Birkenau Silhouette
Auschwitz, Poland 1996

 

Jeff Gusky. 'Where They Lived #4' Cracow, Poland 2001

 

Jeff Gusky
Where They Lived #4
Cracow, Poland 2001

 

 

Gorecki Symphony No. 3 “Sorrowful Songs” – Lento e Largo

 

 

Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Phone: 313.833.7900

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Thursday 9 am – 4 pm
Friday 9 am – 10 pm
Saturday – Sunday 10 am – 5 pm
Monday Closed

Detroit Institute of the Arts website

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, a photographic archive and form of cultural memory, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Mask’ 1994

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