Posts Tagged ‘E. O. Hoppé

27
May
20

Photobook: E. O. Hoppé. ‘Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape’ 1926 Part 2

May 2020

Publisher: Ernst Wasmuth A.G. / Berlin
With an Introduction by Charles F. G. Masterman

 

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Land's End, Cornwall' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
74: Land’s End, Cornwall
1926

 

 

In this, the second tranche of photographs from E. O. Hoppé’s 1926 book Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape, we can analyse some of the techniques of picture construction that the artist has so creatively mastered.

Firstly, that of the floating horizon line. In photographs such as 74: Land’s End, Cornwall; 80: Selworthy, Somerset; 82: Selworthy Church, Selworthy, Somerset; 84: Minehead, Somerset; and 91: Cambden Crescent in Bath, Somerset, Hoppé com/piles the foreground with tone, form and structure, but let’s the eye escape to a distant horizon which moves up and down, according to context, place, space… within the image frame. Time and again he uses this method of allowing the eye to escape the confines of the image.

Secondly, a framing device that the artist is particularly fond of is that of the road, pathway or bridge that helps lead the eye into the image and on to the vanishing point. We can see this approach in photographs such as 96: Approach to Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral; 97: The Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucestershire; 101: Withe Cottage, Conway, Wales; and 132: The Bridge, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire.

Another framing device that the artist uses very effectively is what I call the blocked approach (to the subject) – which can be seen in photographs such as 77: Glastonbury Abbey, Somerset; 117: Chester, Cheshire; 119: Norman Arches, Much Wenlock Abbey, Shropshire; and 142: Wilsford Manor, Wiltshire, where the object which is in focus in the distance is revealed through out of focus arches, wood, masonry or pillars.

A further device is that of the mid-distance band within the pictorial plane, where Hoppé contains the important architectural information into a central section of information. In photographs such as 103: Carnavon Castle, Wales; 121: Evesham, Worcestershire; and 144: Bideston, Wiltshire the artist focuses the viewers attention in the mid-distance, where the buildings float between ground and air. Instead of closing in to fill the frame, Hoppé is content, satisfied with things as they are… happy to enunciate in the images the sum of what he has perceived, discovered, and learned about his subject, without the need to approach to closely or force the matter. In other words, he lets the architecture speak for itself within the landscape.

In looking at architectural forms of different periods, Hoppé does not rely on the formulaic, the tried and tested traditions of landscape and architecture photography from the Victorian and Edwardian eras. His is not the normal seeing of flat images with limited depth (of substance, of feeling). He is too talented (and experimental) and artist for that.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

.
Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image. These photographs are published under fair use conditions for educational purposes only.

 

This magnificent set of pictures displays, with all the art of genius both in selection and technical skill, the beauty of the British Isles. I know of no similar collection which could give alike to the foreigner who wonders what England is like, to the Englishman who has wandered from his native land into all the great dominions of the world, and to the man who has remained behind, that particular sense of pleasure mingled with pain which all beauty excites, and excites especially a passionate love in the vision of home.

This is an introduction to pictures of the landscapes and the works of man; these latter ennobled by the associations of time, and in some cases by time’s decay. They open vistas through which one may gaze at the history of England for a thousand years.

Charles F. G. Masterman

 

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Packhorse Bridge, Allerford, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
75: Packhorse Bridge, Allerford, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Glastonbury Abbey, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
77: Glastonbury Abbey, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Selworthy, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
80: Selworthy, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Selworthy, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
81: Selworthy, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Selworthy Church, Selworthy, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
82: Selworthy Church, Selworthy, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'From Porlock Hill, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
83: From Porlock Hill, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Minehead, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
84: Minehead, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Minehead, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
86: Minehead, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Market Place, Dunster' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
87: The Market Place, Dunster
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Royal Crescent, Bath, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
89: The Royal Crescent, Bath, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Bath, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
90: Bath, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Cambden Crescent in Bath, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
91: Cambden Crescent in Bath, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Wells Cathedral, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
93: Wells Cathedral, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Approach to Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
96: Approach to Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
97: The Cloisters, Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Pembridge, Herefordshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
98: Pembridge, Herefordshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Withe Cottage, Conway, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
101: Withe Cottage, Conway, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Carnavon Castle, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
102: Carnavon Castle, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Carnavon Castle, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
103: Carnavon Castle, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Pass of Bwlch-Goerd, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
105: Pass of Bwlch-Goerd, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Bwlch-Goerd Pass, on the Road to Bala, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
106: Bwlch-Goerd Pass, on the Road to Bala, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Druid Circle, Aberystwyth, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
107: The Druid Circle, Aberystwyth, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'On the Bwlch-y-Goerd Pass, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
108: On the Bwlch-y-Goerd Pass, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Beddgelert, Carnavonshire, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
110: Beddgelert, Carnavonshire, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Llandinam Lake, Mid-Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
111: Llandinam Lake, Mid-Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Snowdon, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
112: Snowdon, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Snowdon at Pen-y-Gwryd, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
113: Snowdon at Pen-y-Gwryd, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Llanberis Pass, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
114: Llanberis Pass, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Wye Valley, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
115: Wye Valley, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'In the Wye Valley, Wales' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
116: In the Wye Valley, Wales
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Chester, Cheshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
117: Chester, Cheshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Norman Arches, Much Wenlock Abbey, Shropshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
119: Norman Arches, Much Wenlock Abbey, Shropshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Bridgenorth, Shropshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
120: Bridgenorth, Shropshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Evesham, Worcestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
121: Evesham, Worcestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Harlebury Castle, Worcestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
124: Harlebury Castle, Worcestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Worcester Cathedral' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
125: Worcester Cathedral
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Rous Lench, Worcestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
126: Rous Lench, Worcestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Court Farm, Broadway, Worcestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
127: Court Farm, Broadway, Worcestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Broadway, Worcestershire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
130: Broadway, Worcestershire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Bridge, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
132: The Bridge, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Ann Hathaway's Cottage, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
133: Ann Hathaway’s Cottage, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 134: The Grammar School, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
134: The Grammar School, Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Welfford-on-Avon, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
135: Welfford-on-Avon, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Leycester Hospital, Warwick, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
137: Leycester Hospital, Warwick, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Leycester Hospital, Warwick, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
138: Leycester Hospital, Warwick, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
139: Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)'Stoneleigh Abbey, Near Leamington, Warwickshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
140: Stoneleigh Abbey, Near Leamington, Warwickshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Wilsford Manor, Wiltshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
142: Wilsford Manor, Wiltshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Wilsford Manor, Wiltshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
143: Wilsford Manor, Wiltshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Bideston, Wiltshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
144: Bideston, Wiltshire
1926

 

 

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22
May
20

Photobook: E. O. Hoppé. ‘Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape’ 1926 Part 1

May 2020

Publisher: Ernst Wasmuth A.G. / Berlin
With an Introduction by Charles F. G. Masterman

 

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape cover' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
Publisher Ernst Wasmuth A.G. / Berlin
Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape cover
1926
304 photoprints

 

 

E. O. Hoppé

Now there’s a name to conjure with!

I found this book in a charity shop, for $5. I couldn’t believe my luck. Here is a book, published in 1926, by one of the most underrated and oft forgotten of the great master photographers of the early twentieth century. It contains 304 photoprints of his journey around Great Britain – “picturesque” photographs – with all the implications that this name brings forth, with its link to Pictorialist photography.

Except, some of these photographs are far from “picturesque” ((of a place or building) visually attractive, especially in a quaint or charming way.) In fact, for the time, they can be seen as downright modern in their composition. Hoppé’s construction of the pictorial frame is exquisite. A wonderful sense of balance and proportion, use of chiaroscuro, low depth of field, geometric form, and a shear sense of space pervade these images. His use of near / far is a joy to behold, as he holds the foreground while drawing the viewers gaze into the distance, to an attendant bridge or dome of St Paul’s cathedral.

In this, the first of a four-part posting, what also strikes one is the rich tonality of these photogravure-like photoprints, with their dark, inky shadows and the sfumato blending of mid tones and highlights. Just look at Plate 33, Hoppé’s photograph of Stonehenge (below) and be swept away by this masters voice. In this photograph, as in many of the photographs, there is an almost abstract quality to them coupled with a wistful romanticism for time and place, for the history of the country he is photographing. Just imagine, hiring a car (or possibly a van) and travelling through a summer around Great Britain taking many many photographs, before whittling them down to the final 300 or so. Did he develop the film in the back of the van after each days shooting, before piling into bed at the local hotel? I don’t know, but I want to go on that road journey!

Being British, these photographs have a great pull and nostalgia for me. I love the British countryside and miss it dearly. What particularly strikes me about them is the absence of people and cars in the photographs, and how archaic and ancient this land seems. Despite being the head of the British Empire, despite being the leader of the Industrial Revolution (pictured throughout the book with pictures of Manchester and the Northern industrial cities), you cannot imagine that this country, a mere 14 years after these photographs were taken, would be on its knees after the withdrawal from Dunkirk, facing invasion from the Nazis… and yet, somehow, hold out, and eventually win the Second World War with the help of Russia and America.

These photographs portray Great Britain as an almost medieval country complete with castle and moat, cathedral and henge, fog descending over the Thames, horse and plough tilling the fields with nere a tractor in sight. People in one’s and two’s tramp the deserted streets, while thatched cottages silently await the rushing conflagration. How Great Britain, pictured here in all its beauty and serenity, survived the coming Armageddon – can perhaps be seen in these photographs very essence, their sense of history and place, of steadfastness and Britishness.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

.
Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image. These photographs are published under fair use conditions for educational purposes only.

 

This magnificent set of pictures displays, with all the art of genius both in selection and technical skill, the beauty of the British Isles. I know of no similar collection which could give alike to the foreigner who wonders what England is like, to the Englishman who has wandered from his native land into all the great dominions of the world, and to the man who has remained behind, that particular sense of pleasure mingled with pain which all beauty excites, and excites especially a passionate love in the vision of home.

This is an introduction to pictures of the landscapes and the works of man; these latter ennobled by the associations of time, and in some cases by time’s decay. They open vistas through which one may gaze at the history of England for a thousand years.

Charles F. G. Masterman

 

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape cover' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
Publisher Ernst Wasmuth A.G. / Berlin
Picturesque Great Britain: Its Architecture and Landscape title page
1926
304 photoprints

 

 

Emil Otto Hoppé (14 April 1878 – 9 December 1972) was a German-born British portrait, travel, and topographic photographer active between 1907 and 1945. Born to a wealthy family in Munich, he moved to London in 1900 to train as a financier, but took up photography and rapidly achieved great success.

He was the only son of a prominent banker, and was educated in the finest schools of Munich, Paris and Vienna. Upon leaving school he served apprenticeships in German banks for ten years, before accepting a position with the Shanghai Banking Corporation. He never arrived in China. The first leg of his journey took him to England where he met an old school friend. Hoppé married his old school friend’s sister, Marion Bliersbach, and stayed in London. While working for the Deutsche Bank, he became increasingly enamored with photography, and, in 1907, jettisoned his commercial career and opened a portrait studio. Within a few years, E.O. Hoppé was the undisputed leader of pictorial portraiture in Europe. To say that someone has a “household name” has become a cliché, yet in Hoppé’s case the phrase is apt. Rarely in the history of the medium has a photographer been so famous in his own lifetime among the general public. He was as famous as his sitters. It is difficult to think of a prominent name in the fields of politics, art, literature, and the theatre who did not pose for his camera.”

Although Hoppé was one of the most important photographic artists of his era and highly celebrated in his time, in 1954, at the age of 76, he sold his body of photographic work to a commercial London picture archive, the Mansell Collection. In the collection, the work was filed by subject in with millions of other stock pictures and no longer accessible by author. Almost all of Hoppé’s photographic work – that which gained him the reputation as Britain’s most influential international photographer between 1907 and 1939 – was accidentally obscured from photo-historians and from photo-history itself. It remained in the collection for over thirty years after Hoppé’s death, and was not fully accessible to the public until the collection closed down and was acquired by new owners in the United States.

In 1994 photographic art curator Graham Howe retrieved Hoppé’s photographic work from the picture library and rejoined it with the Hoppé family archive of photographs and biographical documents. This was the first time since 1954 that the complete E.O. Hoppé Collection was gathered together. Many years were spent in cataloguing, conservation, and research of the recovered work.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'London's River' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
1: London’s River
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'St. Paul’s Cathedral from the Bankside, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
2: St. Paul’s Cathedral from the Bankside, London
1926

 

 E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Tower of London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
3: The Tower of London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'London Bridge, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
4: London Bridge, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Thames at Blackfriars, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
5: The Thames at Blackfriars, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Whitehall, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
9: Whitehall, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Westminster from the St James' Park, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
10: Westminster from the St James’ Park, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Hyde Park Corner, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
11: Hyde Park Corner, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Kensington Gardens, London' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
12: Kensington Gardens, London
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Henley Bridge, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
13: Henley Bridge, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'High Street, Guildford, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
14: High Street, Guildford, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Burford, Dorking, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
15: Burford, Dorking, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Shere, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
17: Shere, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Sutton Place, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
18: Sutton Place, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'High Street in Mayfield, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
19: High Street in Mayfield, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Seaford Cliffs, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
22: Seaford Cliffs, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Downs at Seaford, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
23: The Downs at Seaford, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Battlements, Arundel Castle, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
24: Battlements, Arundel Castle, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Entrance to Keep, Arundel Castle, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
25: Entrance to Keep, Arundel Castle, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Arundel Castle, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
26: Arundel Castle, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Old Tilting Court, Arundel Castle, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
27: The Old Tilting Court, Arundel Castle, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Horsham Church, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
28: Horsham Church, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Old Houses Horsham, Sussex' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
29: Old Houses Horsham, Sussex
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Cave Lingfield, Surrey' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
30: The Cave Lingfield, Surrey
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Deanery Close, Winchester, Hampshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
31: The Deanery Close, Winchester, Hampshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Atlantic from Bournemouth Cliffs' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
32: The Atlantic from Bournemouth Cliffs
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
33: Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Ploughing, Hampshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
34: Ploughing, Hampshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Athelhampton, Dorchester, Dorsetshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
36: Athelhampton, Dorchester, Dorsetshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'St Peters Church, Dorchester, Dorsetshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
40: St Peters Church, Dorchester, Dorsetshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'High Street, In Lyme Regis, Dorsetshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
41: High Street, In Lyme Regis, Dorsetshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Needles, Isle of Wight' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
43: The Needles, Isle of Wight
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Landslide, Luccombe Common, Ventnor, Isle of Wight' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
44: Landslide, Luccombe Common, Ventnor, Isle of Wight
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Torquay, from Marine Drive, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
45: Torquay, from Marine Drive, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Coast at Salcombe, Devon' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
47: Coast at Salcombe, Devon
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Exeter Cathedral, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
49: Exeter Cathedral, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Exeter Cathedral, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
50: Exeter Cathedral, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Porlock, Somerset' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
55: Porlock, Somerset
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Fingle Bridge, Dartmoor, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
57: Fingle Bridge, Dartmoor, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Ancient Tomb, Bovey Tracey, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
60: Ancient Tomb, Bovey Tracey, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Ashburnham, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
61: Ashburnham, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Blackawton, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
62: Blackawton, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Bolt Tail, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
63: Bolt Tail, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Quai, Clovelly, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
64: The Quai, Clovelly, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'High Street in Clovelly, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
65: High Street in Clovelly, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Cliffs near Ilfracombe, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
66: The Cliffs near Ilfracombe, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'The Harbour, Ilfracombe, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
67: The Harbour, Ilfracombe, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Merriefield Church, Devonport, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
68: Merriefield Church, Devonport, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Dartmouth, Devonshire' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
70: Dartmouth, Devonshire
1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972) 'Coast at Fowey, Cornwall' 1926

 

E. O. Hoppé (British, born Germany 1878-1972)
71: Coast at Fowey, Cornwall
1926

 

 

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15
Dec
17

Book: Photographs from ‘Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit’ [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] 1928 Part 1

December 2017

Authors: Hermann and Marianne Aubel

Publisher: Karl Robert Langewiesche Vlg. Königstein, 1928. 112 pages, numerous illustrations. Pictures of Isadora Duncan, Nijinski, Anna Pavlova, Alexander Sacharoff, Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff, Die Schwestern Wiesenthal, Tamara Karsavina, La Argentina, Ellen Petz, Niddy Impekoven, Rudolf von Laban, Mary Wigman, Palucca, Harald Kreutzberg, Javanische Tanzgruppe.
Language: German

 

 

A performance by the Natural Dance Movement in silk robes c. 2000

 

A performance by the Natural Dance Movement in silk robes, England
c. 2000
Photograph taken by my mother

 

 

I have always loved dancing… it comes from the soul. I have danced since 1975 – pre-disco, through disco, high energy, new romantics, soul, trance, techno and more. I still go out dancing today. While this is a different kind of dance, notably free dance, all forms of dance are a connection to music, earth, cosmos. A connection to the earliest of human beings dancing round an open fire.

This is a book I bought on the Internet for $12. I have scanned the photographs and given them a digital clean. The costumes are fabulous, the poses exquisite, exotic, and joyous. The silhouettes and shapes created are just glorious. The photographs usually have low depth of field, the figures “caught” in front of contextless backgrounds. But as Grete Wiesenthal’s assistant Maria Josefa Schaffgotsch observes, the time freeze of the photograph is the antithesis of free dance:
.

“Grete Wiesnethal’s primary concern was to overcome as far as possible the unavoidable static element of classical dance and to dissolve everything that smacked of a pose in a never-ending stream of movement. The flowing, swinging, wavelike three-four rhythm, transforming Strauss’s waltzes into movement – that was her particular art, that was what made her world famous.”1

.
Many of the photographs work against the nature of the medium, and the idea of posing for the camera, to capture the fleeting expressiveness of dance. Just look at the ecstatic shape created in Hugo Erfurth’s Schwestern Wiesenthal [Wiesenthal sisters] (c. 1928, below). Indeed, the language of spiritual revelation!

My favourites are the photographs of Sent M’Ahesa and Nijinski. But honestly, they are all glorious. The photographs in this book, “The Artistic Dance of Our Time,” represent the cutting edge of dance, art, and photography in 1928. It is so nice to seem them now.

Marcus

 

  1. Andrea Amort. “Free Dance in Interwar Vienna,” in Deborah Holmes and Lisa Silverman (eds.,). Interwar Vienna: Culture Between Tradition and Modernity. Rochester, New York: Camden House, 2009, p. 123.

 

Free dance

Free dance is a 20th-century dance form that preceded modern dance. Rebelling against the rigid constraints of classical ballet, Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan and Ruth St. Denis (with her work in theatre) developed their own styles of free dance and laid the foundations of American modern dance with their choreography and teaching. In Europe Rudolf Laban, Emile Jaques-Dalcroze and François Delsarte developed their own theories of human movement and methods of instruction that led to the development of European modern and Expressionist dance.

Free dance was prolific in Central and Eastern Europe, where national schools were created, such as the School of Musical Movement (Heptachor), in Russia, and the Orkesztika School, in Hungary. (Text from the Wikipedia website)

 

Hermann and Marianne Aubel (authors) Karl Robert Langewiesche (publisher) 'Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time]' 1928

 

Hermann and Marianne Aubel (authors)
Karl Robert Langewiesche (publisher)
Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time]
1928
Book front cover

 

 

Elvira (Munich)
Isadora Duncan
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 1
Published 1928

 

 

“Wir sehen das Ziel der Tanzkunst und jeder Kunst darin, eine Sprache geistiger Offenbarung zu sein, aus der Natur heraus sich äubernd und mit ihr verbunden.”

“We see the goal of dance and every art as being a language of spiritual revelation, external to and connected with it.”

.
Hermann and Marianne Aubel

 

 

Vielleicht auf keinem Gebiet kunstlerischer Entfaltung haben die letzten Jahrsehute ein solches Strebennach Weiterentwicklung gebracht, wie auf dem Gebiete der Tanzkunst. Sie ist, als letztes Zile der Arbeit an der menschilchen Bewegung, mehr und mehr mit in den Mittelpunkt des allgeneinen Interesses gerückt und übt so eine gröbere Wirkung auf breitere Kreis aus, als sie es noch vor 20, ja vor 10 Jahen vermochte. Eine neue Form des bewegten Ausdrucks will sich bilden.

Perhaps in no field of artistic development, the last years have brought about such a development as in the field of dance art. It is, as the last part of the work on the human movement, more and more pushed into the centre of general interest, and thus exerts a greater effect on a wider circle than it did 20 or even 10 years ago. A new form of moving expression wants to form itself. (Introduction, V)

 

Rudolf Jobst (Vienna) 'Schwestern Wiesenthal [Wiesenthal sisters]' c. 1928

 

Rudolf Jobst (Vienna)
Schwestern Wiesenthal [Wiesenthal sisters]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 4
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Schwestern Wiesenthal [Wiesenthal sisters]' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Schwestern Wiesenthal [Wiesenthal sisters]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 5
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Grete Wiesenthal' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Grete Wiesenthal
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 6
Published 1928

 

 

Grete Wiesenthal (1885-1970)

Austrian dancer and choreographer. She and her sister Elsa (1887-967) were both dancers with the Vienna Court Opera Ballet but she left in 1904 to choreograph and perform her own work, which was accompanied primarily by waltz music (Chopin and J. Strauss). She proved so popular that her sisters Elsa and Berta joined her in works that communicated a (then) revolutionarily ecstatic response to waltz rhythms. The sisters moved to Berlin where they performed together until 1910, after which Grete worked independently, choreographing and performing in vaudeville, film, and opera around Europe and the US. The Grete Wiesenthal Dance group (1945-56) toured the world and two of its members subsequently staged her dances for the Vienna State Opera Ballet. …

The “ambassador of waltz,” began life as a dancer within the traditions of ballet; entered the corps (1901) and advanced to coryphée (1902); with sister Elsa, began choreographing new ways of movement and expression through dance and allied with Secession circle of innovators; with Elsa and sister Berta, came to prominence as the Wiesenthal sisters at Vienna’s Cabaret Fledermaus (1908); in Berlin, danced with sisters at Max Reinhardt’s Deutsches Theater; danced role of 1st elf in Reinhardt’s production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Munich’s Artist’s Theater (1909); with sisters, performed at London’s Hippodrome and at Théâtre du Vaudeville in Paris (1909).

Made solo debut in Berlin in pantomime Sumurùn, produced by Reinhardt (1910); made US debut at Winter Garden in NY (1912); created role of Kitchen Boy in Reinhardt’s Stuttgart production of Der Bürger als Edelmann, with music by Richard Strauss; appeared in “Grete Wiesenthal Series” of films (1913–14): Kadra Sâfa, Erlkönigs Tochter and Die goldne Fliege; following WWI, opened dancing school (1919); returned to Vienna stage at Staatsoper (State Opera House), in lead role of her ballet Der Taugenichts in Wien (The Ne’er-Do-Well in Vienna, 1927); remained active professionally, appearing in solo dance concerts and tours, including a return to NY (1933); appointed professor of dance at Vienna’s Academy for Music and the Performing Arts (1934), then served as director of artistic dance section (1945-52).

After WWII, her work enjoyed a renaissance in Austria, especially the dances she created for various Salzburg Festival productions; wrote autobiography, Der Aufstieg (The Way Upwards, 1919), which appeared as Die ersten Schritte (The First Steps, 1947); also published a novel, Iffi: Roman einer Tänzerin (Iffi: Novel of a Dancer, 1951); best remembered for having transformed the Viennese waltz from a monotonous one-two-three movement, performed by smiling dancers laced into corsets, into an ecstatic experience, performed by dancers with unbound hair and swinging dresses.

Text from the Gustav Mahler website

 

Rudolf Jobst (Vienna) 'Else Wiesenthal' c. 1928

 

Rudolf Jobst (Vienna)
Else Wiesenthal
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 7
Published 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 10
Published 1928

 

Franz Löwy (Vienna) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Franz Löwy (Vienna)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 11
Published 1928

 

 

Sent M’Ahesa (born August 17, 1883 in Riga as Else von Carlberg – November 19, 1970 in Stockholm ) was a expressive dancer, who worked in Germany until the 1920s. She also wrote articles for newspapers and magazines.

She was portrayed by Max Beckmann, Bernhard Hoetger, Dietz Edzard and Adolf Münzer. The Greek writer Nikos Kazantzakis saw her dance in Berlin in 1923 (“She danced only once and then returned to her Munich villa”) and wrote to his wife: “Since I saw Sent M’Ahesa dancing I do not want any other kind of dance, I saw its highest form.” (Wikipedia)

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 12
Published 1928

 

d'Ora (Arthur Benda) (Vienna) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

d’Ora (Arthur Benda) (Vienna)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 13
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 14
Published 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 15
Published 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 16
Published 1928

 

Franz Löwy (Vienna) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Franz Löwy (Vienna)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 17
Published 1928

 

 

Sent M’Ahesa

“Such confusion of identity did not apply in the case of Sent M’Ahesa (Elsa von Carlberg 1893-1970), whom audiences persisted in identifying with Egyptian dances (though her dance aesthetic  included images from other ancient o exotic cultures). She performed all her dances solo. Born in Latvia, she went to Berlin in 1907 with her sister to study Egyptology but became so enchanted with ancient Egyptian art and artifacts that she decided to pursue her interest through dance rather than scholarship… Under he name of Sent M’Ahesa, she presented a program of Egyptian dances in Munich in December 1909 (Ettlinger). From then until the mid-1920s, she achieved fame for her exceptionally dramatic dances dominated by motifs from ancient Egyptian iconography. …

Her dances always functioned in relation to intricate, highly decorative costumes of her own design, so that it appeared as if she chose movements for their effect upon her costume.  In her moon goddess (or Isis) dance, she attached large, diaphanous cloth wings to her black-sleeved arms… Sent M’Ahesa often exposed her flesh below the navel, but I have yet to find a picture of her in which she exposed her hair, so keen was she on the use of wigs, helmets, caps, scarves, kerchiefs, tiaras, masks, and crowns. In her peacock dance, she attached a large fan of white feather plumes to her spine. In other dances, she draped herself with tassels, decorative aprons, double sashes, layers of jeweled necklaces, and arm, wrist, and ankle bracelets. Only in her Indian dances did she wear anything resembling pants. …

… her body was wonderfully svelte, and her face displayed a cool, chiseled beauty, I think, rather, that she sought to decontextualise female beauty and erotic feeling from archetypal images of them originating in cultures other than her own or her audience’s; she sought to dramatize a tension between a modern female body and old images of female desire and desirability. Ettlinger, in 1910, was perhaps more accurate when he remarked that

“Sent M’Ahesa’s dance has nothing to do with what one commonly understands as dance. She does not produce “beautiful,” “sensually titillating” effects. She does not represent feelings, “fear,” “horror,” “lust,” “despair,” as “lovely.” Her are requires its own style. Her movements are angular, geometrically uncircular, just as we find them in old Egyptian paintings and reliefs. Neither softness of line nor playful grace are the weapons with which she puts us under her spell. On the contrary: her body constructs hard, quite unnaturally broken lines. Arms and legs take on nearly doll-like attitudes. But precisely this deliberate limiting of gestures gives her the possibility of until now unknown, utterly minute intensities, the most exquisite of refinements of bodily expression. With a sinking of the arm of only a few millimeters, she calls forth effects which all the tricks of the ballet school cannot teach.”

Sent M’Ahesa was similar to Schrenck in one respect, even though Schrenck never performed exotic dances: both project and intensely erotic aura while moving within a very confined space. They showed persuasively that convincing signification of erotic desire or pleasure did not depend on a feeling of  freedom in space, as exemplified in the convention of ballet and modern dance, with their cliched use of runs, leaps, pirouettes, and aerial acrobatics. These dancers revealed that erotic aura intensifies in relation to an acute sense of bodily confinement, of the body imploding, turning in on itself, riddled with tensions and contradictory pressures. They adopted movements to portray the body being squeezed and twisted, drifting in to a repertoire of squirms, spasms, angular thrusts, muscular suspensions. Contortionist dancing is perhaps the most extreme expression of this aesthetic. But Sent M’Ahesa complicated the matter by doing exotic dances – that is, she confined her body within a remote cultural-historical context, as if to suggest that the ecstatic body imploded metaphorical as well as physical space.”

Karl Eric Toepfer, “Solo Dancing,” in Karl Eric Toepfer. Empire of Ecstasy: Nudity and Movement in German Body Culture, 1910-1935. University of California Press, 1997, pp. 175-179.

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich) 'Sent M'Ahesa' c. 1928

 

Hanns Holdt (Munich)
Sent M’Ahesa
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 18
Published 1928

 

Dührkoop (Hamburg) 'Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff' c. 1928

 

Minya Diez-Dührkoop (Hamburg)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 19
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 20
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 21
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 23
Published 1928

 

 

Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff

Clotilde von Derp, stage name of Clotilde Margarete Anna Edle von der Planitz (5 November 1892 – 11 January 1974), was a German expressionist dancer, an early exponent of modern dance. Her career was spent essentially dancing together with her husband Alexander Sakharoff with whom she enjoyed a long-lasting relationship. …

As a child in Munich, Clotilde dreamt of becoming a violinist but from an early age she revealed how talented she was as a dancer. After receiving ballet lessons from Julie Bergmann and Anna Ornelli from the Munich Opera, she gave her first performance on 25 April 1910 at the Hotel Union, using the stage name Clotilde von Derp. The audience were enthralled by her striking beauty and youthful grace. Max Reinhardt presented her in the title role in his pantomime Sumurûn which proved a great success while on tour in London. A photo by Rudolf Dührkoop of her was exhibited in 1913 at the Royal Photographic Society. Clotilde was a member of the radical Blaue Reiter Circle which had been started by Wassily Kandinsky in 1911.

Among her admirers were artists such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Yvan Goll. For his Swiss dance presentations, Alexej von Jawlensky gave her make-up resembling his abstract portraits. From 1913, Clotilde appeared with the Russian dancer Alexander Sacharoff with whom she moved to Switzerland during the First World War. Both Sacharoff and Clotilde were known for their transvestite costumes. Clotilde’s femininity was said to be accentuated by the male attire. Her costumes took on an ancient Greek look which she used in Danseuse de Delphes in 1916. Her style was said to be elegant and more modern than that achieved by Isadora Duncan. Their outrageous costumes included wigs made from silver and gold coloured metal, with hats and outfits decorated with flowers and wax fruit.

They married in 1919 and, with the financial support of Edith Rockefeller, appeared at the Metropolitan Opera in New York but without any great success. They lived in Paris until the Second World War. Using the name “Les Sakharoff.” Their 1921 poster by George Barbier to advertise their work was seen as showing a “mutually complementary androgynous couple” “united in dance” joined together in an act of “artistic creation.”

They toured widely visiting China and Japan which was so successful that they returned again in 1934. They and their extravagant costumes visited both North and South America. They found themselves in Spain when France was invaded by Germany. They returned to South America making a new base in Buenos Aires until 1949. They toured Italy the following year and they took up an invitation to teach in Rome by Guido Chigi Saracini. They taught at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena for Saracini and they also opened their own dance school in Rome. She and Sakharoff stopped dancing together in 1956. They both continued to live in Rome until their deaths. Clotilde gave and sold many of their writings and costumes, that still remained, to museums and auctions. She eventually sold the iconic 1909 painting of her husband by Alexander Jawlensky. In 1997 the German Dance Archive Cologne purchased many remaining items and they have 65 costumes, hundreds of set and costume designs and 500 photographs.

Unlike her husband, Clotilde had a taste for modern music, frequently choosing melancholic music by contemporaries such as Max Reger, Florent Schmitt and Stravinsky. Her haunting eyes and delicate smiles gave the impression she took pleasure in displaying her finely-costumed voluptuous body, even when she reached her forties. She was particularly effective in interpreting Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune. Hans Brandenbourg maintained her ballet technique was superior to that of Alexander although he did not consider her a virtuoso. Clotilde also moved more independently of the music, dancing to the impression it created in her mind rather than to the rhythm.

Text from the Wikipedia website

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff' c. 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 26
Published 1928

 

Hugo Erfurth (Dresden) 'Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff' c. 1928

 

Veritas (Stephanie Held) (Munich)
Clotilde von Derp-Sacharoff
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 27
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' From the works "The Russian Theater", Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Aus dem werke “Das Russische Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Wien [From the works “The Russian Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 28
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' Portrait cards Verlag Leiser, Berlin - Wilmersdorf c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Porträt karten verlag Leiser, Berlin – Wilmersdorf
Portrait cards Verlag Leiser, Berlin – Wilmersdorf
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 29
Published 1928

 

E. O. Hoppé (London) 'Nijinski' c. 1928

 

E. O. Hoppé (London)
Nijinski
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 30
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' From the works "The Russian Theater", Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Aus dem werke “Das Russische Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Wien [From the works “The Russian Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 31
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' Portrait cards Verlag Leiser, Berlin - Wilmersdorf c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Porträt karten verlag Leiser, Berlin – Wilmersdorf
Portrait cards Verlag Leiser, Berlin – Wilmersdorf
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 32
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' From the works "The Russian Theater", Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Aus dem werke “Das Russische Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Wien [From the works “The Russian Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 33
Published 1928

 

'Nijinski' From the works "The Russian Theater", Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna c. 1928

 

Nijinski
Aus dem werke “Das Russische Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Wien [From the works “The Russian Theater”, Amalthea-Verlag, Vienna]
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 35
Published 1928

 

d'Ora (Arthur Benda) (Vienna) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

d’Ora (Arthur Benda) (Vienna)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 36
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 37
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 38
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 39
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 40
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 41
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavolva
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 42
Published 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Hänse Herrmann (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 43
Published 1928

 

Ernst Schneider (Berlin) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

Ernst Schneider (Berlin)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 44
Published 1928

 

E. O. Hoppé (London) 'Anna Pavlova' c. 1928

 

E. O. Hoppé (London)
Anna Pavlova
From Der Kunstlerische Tanz Unserer Zeit [The Artistic Dance of Our Time] p. 45
Published 1928

 

 

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14
Dec
11

Review: ‘The mad square: Modernity in German Art 1910 – 37’ at The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 25th November 2011 – 4th March 2012

 

Irene Bayer. 'No title (Man on stage)' c. 1927

 

Irene Bayer (American, 1898-1991)
No title (Man on stage)
c. 1927
Gelatin silver photograph
Printed image 10.6 h x 7.6 w cm
Purchased 1983
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

 

This is one of the best exhibitions this year in Melbourne bar none. Edgy and eclectic the work resonates with the viewer in these days of uncertainty: THIS should have been the Winter Masterpieces exhibition!

The title of the exhibition, The mad square (Der tolle Platz) is taken from Felix Nussbaum’s 1931 painting of the same name where “the ‘mad square’ is both a physical place – the city, represented in so many works in the exhibition, and a reference to the state of turbulence and tension that characterises the period.” The exhibition showcases how artists responded to modern life in Germany in the interwar years, years that were full of murder and mayhem, putsch, revolution, rampant inflation, starvation, the Great Depression and the rise of National Socialism. Portrayed is the dystopian, dark side of modernity (where people are the victims of a morally bankrupt society) as opposed to the utopian avant-garde (the prosperous, the wealthy), where new alliances emerge between art and politics, technology and the mass media. Featuring furniture, decorative arts, painting, sculpture, collage and photography in the sections World War 1 and the Revolution, Dada, Bauhaus, Constructivism and the Machine Aesthetic, Metropolis, New Objectivity and Power and Degenerate Art, it is the collages and photographs that are the strongest elements of the exhibition, particularly the photographs. What a joy they are to see.

There is a small 2″ x 3″ contact print portrait of Hanna Höch by Richard Kauffmann, Penetrate yourself or: I embrace myself (1922) that is an absolute knockout. Höch is portrayed as the ‘new women’ with short bobbed hair and loose modern dress, her self-image emphasised through a double exposure that fragments her face and multiplies her hands, set against a contextless background. The ‘new women’ fragmented and broken apart (still unsure of herself?). The photograph is so small and intense it takes your breath away. Similarly, there is the small, intimate photograph No title (Man on Stage) (c. 1927) by Irene Bayer (see above) that captures performance as ‘total art’, a combination of visual arts, dance, music, architecture and costume design. In contrast is a large 16 x 20″ photograph of the Bauhaus balconies (1926) by László Moholy-Nagy (see below) where the whites are so creamy, the perspective so magnificent.

No title (Metalltanz) (c. 1928-29) by T. Lux Feinenger, a photographer that I do not know well, is an exceptional photograph and print. Again small, this time dark and intense, the image features man as dancer performing gymnastics in front of reflective, metal sculptures. The metal becomes an active participant in the Metalltanz or ‘Dance in metal’ because of its reflective qualities. The print, from the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles is luminous. In fact all the prints from the Getty in this exhibition are of the most outstanding quality, a highlight of the exhibition for me. Another print from the Getty that features metal and performance is Untitled (Spiral Costume, from the Triadic Ballet) by T Grill c. 1926 – 27 (see below) where the spiral costume becomes an extension of the body, highlighting its form. Also highlighting form, objectivity and detachment is a wonderful 3 x 5″ photograph of the New Bauhaus Building, Dessau (1926) by Lucia Moholy from the Getty collection, the first I have ever seen in the flesh by this artist. Outstanding.

Following, we have 4 photograms by Lucia’s husband, László Moholy-Nagy which display formalist experimentation “inspired by machine aesthetic, exploring a utopian belief that Constructivism and abstract art could play a role in the process of social reform.” Complimenting these photograms is a row of six, yes six! Moholy-Nagy including Dolls (Puppen) 1926-7 (Getty), The law of the series 1925 (Getty), Lucia at the breakfast table 1926 (Getty), Spring, Berlin 1928 (George Eastman House), Berlin Radio Tower 1928 (Art Institute of Chicago) and Light space modulator 1930 (Getty). All six photographs explore the fascinating relationship between avant-garde art and photography, between they eye and perspective, all the while declaiming what Moholy-Nagy called the “new vision”; angles, shadows and geometric patterns that defy traditional perspective “removing the space from associations with the real world creating a surreal, disjointed image.” This topographic mapping flattens perspective in the case of the Berlin radio tower allowing the viewer to see the world in a new way.

Finally two groups of photographs that are simply magnificent.

First 8 photographs in a row that focus on the order and progressive nature of the modern world, the inherent beauty of technology captured in formalist studies of geometric forms. The prints range from soft pictorialist renditions to sharp clarity. The quality of the prints is amazing. Artists include the wonderful E. O. Hoppé, Albert Renger-Patzsch (an outstandingly beautiful photograph, Harbour with cranes 1927 that is my favourite photograph in the exhibition, see below), Two Towers 1937-38 by Werner Mantz and some early Wolfgang Sievers before he left Germany for Australia in 1938 (Blast furnace in the Ruhr, Germany 1933, see below). These early Sievers are particularly interesting, especially when we think of his later works produced in Australia. Lucky were many artists who survived in Germany or fled from Nazi persecution at the last moment, including John Heartfield who relocated to Czechoslovakia in 1933 and then fled to London in 1938 and August Sander whose life and work were severely curtailed under the Nazi regime and whose son died in prison in 1944 near the end of his ten year sentence (Wikipedia).

August Sander. Now there is a name to conjure with. The second magnificent group are 7 photographs that are taken from Sander’s seminal work People of the 20th Century. All the photographs have soft, muted tones of greys with no strong highlights and, usually, contextless backgrounds. The emphasis is on archetypes, views of people who exist on the margins of society – circus performers, bohemians, artists, the unemployed and blind people. In all the photographs there is a certain frontality (not necessarily physical) to the portraits, a self consciousness in the sitter, a wariness of the camera and of life. This self consciousness can be seen in the two photographs that are the strongest in the group – Secretary at West German radio in Cologne, 1931 and Match seller 1927 (see below).

There is magic here. Her face wears a somewhat quizzical air – questioning, unsure, vulnerable – despite the trappings of affluence and fashionability (the smoking of the cigarette, the bobbed hair). He is wary of the camera, his face and hands isolated by Sander while the rest of his body falls into shadow. His right hand is curled under, almost deformed, his shadow falling on the stone at right, the only true brightness in this beautiful image the four boxes of matches he clutches in his left hand: as Sander titles him ironically, The Businessman.

Working as I do these days with lots of found images from the 1940s – 60s that I digitally restore to life, I wonder what happened to these people during the dark days of World War 2. Did they survive the cataclysm, the drop into the abyss? I want to know, I want to reach out to these people to send them good energy. I hope that they did but their wariness in front of the camera, so intimately ‘taken’ by Sander, makes me feel the portent of things to come. How differently we see images armed with the hindsight of history!

In conclusion, this is a fantastic exhibition that will undoubtedly be in my top ten of the year for Melbourne in 2011.

.
Many thankx to Michael Thorneycroft for his help and The National Gallery of Victoria for allowing me to publish the accredited photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) 'Photograph (Berlin Radio Tower)' 1928/29

 

László Moholy-Nagy (American, born Hungary, 1895-1946)
Berlin Radio Tower
1928
Gelatin silver print
36 × 25.5cm
Julien Levy Collection, Special Photography Acquisition Fund
© 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

 

 

Over the winter and spring of 1927–28, Bauhaus professor László Moholy-Nagy took a series of perhaps nine views looking down from the Berlin Radio Tower, one of the most exciting new constructions in the German capital. Moholy had already photographed the Eiffel Tower in Paris from below, looking up through the tower’s soaring girders. In Berlin, however, Moholy turned his camera around and pointed it straight down at the ground. This plunging perspective showed off the spectacular narrowness of the Radio Tower, finished in 1926, which rose vertiginously to a height of 450 feet from a base seven times smaller than that of its Parisian predecessor (which opened in 1889). Moholy attached exceptional importance to this, his boldest image: he hung it just above his name in a room devoted to his work at the Berlin showing of Film und Foto, a mammoth traveling exhibition that he had helped to prepare. Moholy also chose this view and one other to offer Julien Levy, the pioneering art dealer, when Levy visited him in Berlin in 1930. The following year the pictures went on view at the Levy Gallery in New York, in Moholy’s first solo exhibition of photographs.

Text from the Art Institute of Chicago website

 

László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) 'Photograph (Light Prop)' 1930

 

László Moholy-Nagy (American, born Hungary, 1895-1946)
Das Lichtrequisit (The light prop)
1930
Gelatin silver print
24 × 18.1 cm (9 7/16 × 7 1/8 in.)
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
© 2014 Estate of László Moholy-Nagy / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

 

 

The Light-Space Modulator is the most spectacular and complete realization of László Moholy-Nagy’s artistic philosophy. Machine parts and mechanical structures began to appear in his paintings after his emigration from Hungary, and they are also seen in the illustrations he selected for the 1922 Buch neuer Künstler (Book of new artists), which includes pictures of motorcars and bridges as well as painting and sculpture. Many contemporary artists incorporated references to machines and technology in their work, and some, like the Russian Constructivist Vladimir Tatlin, even designed plans for fantastic structures, such as the ambitious Monument to the Third International, a proposed architectural spiral of glass and steel with moving tiers and audiovisual broadcasts. (See Tatlin’s Tower.)

In the Light-Space Modulator, Moholy-Nagy was able to create an actual working mechanism. Although he censured capitalism’s inhumane use of technology, he believed it could be harnessed to benefit mankind and that the artist had an important role in accomplishing this. Moholy had made preliminary sketches for kinetic sculptures as early as 1922 and referred to the idea for a light machine in his writings, but it was not until production was financed by an electric company in Berlin in 1930 that this device was built, with the assistance of an engineer and a metalsmith. It was featured at the Werkbund exhibition in Paris the same year, along with the short film Light Display Black-White-Gray, made by Moholy-Nagy to demonstrate and celebrate his new machine.

The Light-Space Modulator is a Moholy-Nagy painting come to life: mobile perforated disks, a rotating glass spiral, and a sliding ball create the effect of photograms in motion. With its gleaming glass and metal surfaces, this piece (now in the collection of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at Harvard University) is not only a machine for creating light displays but also a sculptural object of beauty, photographed admiringly by its creator.

Katherine Ware, László Moholy-Nagy, In Focus: Photographs from the J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 1995), 80 © 1995 The J. Paul Getty Museum

 

Albert Renger-Patzsch (American, born Hungary, 1895-1946) 'Harbour with crane' c. 1927

 

Albert Renger-Patzsch (American, born Hungary, 1895-1946)
Harbour with crane
c. 1927
Gelatin silver photograph
Printed image 22.7 h x 16.8 w cm
Purchased 1983
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

Wolfgang Sievers. 'Blast furnace in the Ruhr, Germany' 1933

 

Wolfgang Sievers (Germany 1913 – Australia 2007)
Blast furnace in the Ruhr, Germany
1933
gelatin silver photograph
27.5 h x 23.0 w cm
Purchased 1988
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

 

The Ruhr region was at the centre of the German acceleration of industry in pre-war Germany, with rapid economic growth creating a heavy demand for coal and steel. In keeping with Modernist trends in photography, Sievers shot this blast furnace – the mechanism that transforms ore into metal – from an unusual, dynamic angle. It dominates the frame, appearing menacing and strange. Despite being imprisoned and beaten by the Gestapo, Sievers studied and taught at a progressive private art school until graduation in 1938. In that year he escaped Germany after being called up for military service, ending up in Australia.

Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

August Sander. 'Match seller' 1927

 

August Sander (German, 1876-1964)
Match seller
1927
from the portfolio People of the 20th century, IV Classes and Professions, 17 The Businessman

 

Robert Wiene, Director (German 1873-1938) Still from the 'Cabinet of Dr Caligari' 1919

 

Robert Wiene, Director (German 1873-1938)
Still from from the Cabinet of Dr Caligari
1919
5 min excerpt, 35mm transferred to DVD, Black and White, silent, German subtitles
Courtesy Transit Film GmbH
Production still courtesy of the British Film Institute and Transit Film GmbH

 

Felix H Man. 'Luna Park' 1929

 

Felix H Man (German 1893-1985)
Luna Park
1929
Gelatin silver photograph
18.1 x 24cm
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
Purchased, 1987
© Felix H Man Estate

 

Hannah Höch. 'Love' 1931

 

Hannah Höch (German 1889-1978)
Love
1931
From the series Love
Photomontage
21.8 x 21.0 cm
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
Purchased, 1983

 

 

Hannah Höch made some of the most interesting Dada collages and photomontages, including Love, an image of two strange composite female. Höch’s technique of pasting images together from magazine clippings and advertisements was a response to the modern era of mass media, and a way of criticising the bourgeois taste for ‘high art’. In many of her works, Höch explores the identity and changing roles of women in modern society.

 

 

The Mad Square takes its name from Felix Nussbaum’s 1931 painting which depicts Berlin’s famous Pariser Platz as a mad and fantastic place. The ‘mad square’ is both a physical place – the city, represented in so many works in the exhibition, and a reference to the state of turbulence and tension that characterises the period. The ‘square’ can also be a modernist construct that saw artists moving away from figurative representations towards increasingly abstract forms.

The exhibition features works by Max Beckman, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Christian Schad, Kurt Schwitters and August Sander. This group represents Germany’s leading generation of interwar artists. Major works by lesser known artists including Karl Hubbuch, Rudolf Schlichter and Hannah Höch are also presented in the exhibition in addition to works by international artists who contributed to German modernism.

The Mad Square brings together a diverse and extensive range of art, created during one of the most important and turbulent periods in European history, offering new insights into the understanding of key German avant‐garde movements including – Expressionism, Dada, Bauhaus, Constructivism, and New Objectivity were linked by radical experimentation and innovation, made possible by an unprecedented freedom of expression.

 

World War 1 and the Revolution

The outbreak of war in 1914 was met with enthusiasm by many German artists and intellectuals who volunteered for service optimistically hoping that it would bring cultural renewal and rapid victory for Germany. The works in this section are by the generation of artists who experienced war first hand. Depictions of fear, anxiety and violence show the devastating effects of war – the disturbing subjects provide insight into tough economic conditions and social dysfunction experienced by many during the tumultuous early years of the Weimar Republic following the abdication of the Kaiser

 

Dada

The philosophical and political despair experienced by poets and artists during World War 1 fuelled the Dada movement, a protest against the bourgeois conception of art. Violent, infantile and chaotic, Dada took its name from the French word for a child’s hobbyhorse or possibly from the sound of a baby’s babble. Its activities included poetry readings and avant‐garde performances, as well as creating new forms of abstract art that subverted all existing conditions in western art. Though short‐lived, in Germany the Dada movement has profoundly influenced subsequent developments in avant-garde art and culture. The impact of the Dada movement was felt throughout Europe – and most powerfully in Germany from 1917-21.

 

Bauhaus

The Bauhaus (1919‐33) is widely considered as the most important school of art and design of the 20th century, very quickly establishing a reputation as the leading and most progressive centre of the international avant‐garde. German architect Walter Gropius founded the school to do away with traditional distinctions between the fine arts and craft, and to forge an entirely new kind of creative designer skilled in both the conceptual aesthetics of art and the technical skills of handicrafts. The Bauhaus was considered to be both politically and artistically radical from its inception and was closed down by the National Socialists in 1933

 

Constructivism and the Machine Aesthetic

Having emerged in Russia after World War I, Constructivism developed in Germany as a set of ideas and practices that experimented with abstract or non-representational forms and in opposition to Expressionism and Dada. Constructivists developed works and theories that fused art and with technology. They shared a utopian belief in social reform, and saw abstract art as playing a central role in this process.

 

Metropolis

By the 1920s Berlin has become the cultural and entertainment capital of the world and mass culture played an important role in distracting a society traumatised by World War 1, the sophisticated metropolis provided a rich source of imagery for artists, it also come to represent unprecedented sexual and personal freedom. In photography modernity was emphasised by unusual views of the metropolis or through the representation of city types. The diverse group of works in this section portray the uninhibited sense of freedom and innovation experienced by artists throughout Germany during the 1920s

 

New Objectivity

By the mid 1920s, a new style emerged that came to be known as Neue Sachlichkeit or New Objectivity. After experiencing the atrocities of World War 1 and the harsh conditions of life in postwar Germany, many artists felt the need to return to the traditional modes of representation with portraiture becoming a major vehicle of this expression, with its emphasis on the realistic representation of the human figure

 

Power and Degenerate Art

After the seizure of power by the National Socialists in 1933 modern artists were forbidden from working and exhibiting in Germany, with their works confiscated from leading museums and then destroyed or sold on the international art market. Many avant‐garde artists were either forced to leave Germany or retreat into a state of ‘inner immigration’.

The Degenerate art exhibition, held in Munich in 1937, represented the culmination of the National Socialists’ assault on modernism. Hundreds of works were selected for the show which aimed to illustrate the mental deficiency and moral decay that had supposedly infiltrated modern German art. The haphazard and derogatory design of the exhibition sought to ridicule and further discredit modern art. Over two million people visited the exhibition while in contrast far fewer attended the Great German art exhibition which sought to promote what the Nazis considered as ‘healthy’ art.

 

Karl Grill. 'Untitled [Spiral Costume, from the Triadic Ballet]' c. 1926-27

 

Karl Grill (German, active Donaueschingen, Germany 1920s)
Untitled (Spiral Costume, from the Triadic Ballet)
c. 1926 – 27
Gelatin silver print
22.5 x 16.2cm
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

 

 

In 1922, Oskar Schlemmer premiered his “Triadic Ballet” in Germany. He named the piece “Triadic” because it was literally composed of multiples of three: three acts, colours, dancers, and shapes. Concentrating on its form and movement, Schlemmer explored the body’s spatial relationship to its architectural surroundings. Although an abstract design, the spiral costume derived from the tutus of classical ballet.

Text from the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles website

 

August Sander. 'Secretary at West German radio in Cologne' 1931, printed by August Sander in the 1950s

 

August Sander (German 1876-1964)
Secretary at West German radio in Cologne
1931, printed by August Sander in the 1950s
from the portfolio People of the 20th century, III The woman, 17 The woman in intellectual and practical occupation
Gelatin silver photograph
29.0 x 22.0cm
Die Photographische Sammlung /SK Stiftung Kultur, August Sander Archiv, Cologne (DGPH1016)
© Die Photographische Sammlung /SK  Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archiv, Cologne. Licensed by Viscopy, Sydney

 

 

Timeline

1910

  • Berlin’s population doubles to two million people

1911

  • Expressionists move from Dresden to Berlin

1912

  • Social Democratic Party (SPD) the largest party in the Reichstag

1913

  • Expressionists attain great success with their city scenes

1914

  • World War I begins
  • George Grosz, Oskar Schlemmer, Otto Dix, Ludwig Hirschfeld Mack, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Max Beckmann and Franz Marc enlist in the army

1915

  • Grosz declared unfit for service, Beckmann suffers a breakdown and Schlemmer wounded

1916

  • Marc dies in combat
  • Dada begins at Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich

1917

  • Lenin and Trotsky form the Soviet Republic after the Tzar is overthrown

1918

  • Richard Huelsenbeck writes a Dada manifesto in Berlin
  • Kurt Schwitters creates Merz assemblages in Hanover
  • Revolutionary uprisings in Berlin and Munich
  • Kaiser Wilhelm II abdicates and flees to Holland
  • Social Democratic Party proclaims the Weimar Republic
  • World War I ends

1919

  • Freikorps assassinates the Spartacist leaders, Karl Leibknecht and Rosa Luxemburg
  • Bauhaus established in Weimer by Walter Gropius
  • Cologne Dada group formed
  • Treaty of Versailles signed

1920

  • Berlin is the world’s third largest city after New York and London
  • Inflation begins in Germany
  • National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP) founded
  • Kapp Putsch fails after right‐wing forces try to gain control over government
  • First International Dada fair opens in Berlin

1921

  • Hitler made chairman of the NSDAP

1922

  • Schlemmer’s Triadic ballet premiers in Stuttgart
  • Hyperinflation continues

1923

  • Hitler sentenced to five years imprisonment for leading the Beer Hall Putsch
  • Inflation decreases and a period of financial stability begins

1924

  • Hitler writes Mein Kampf while in prison
  • Reduction of reparations under the Dawes Plan

1925

  • New Objectivity exhibition opens at the Mannheim Kunsthalle
  • The Bauhaus relocates to Dessau

1926

  • Germany joins the League of Nations

1927

  • Fritz Lang’s film Metropolis released
  • Unemployment crisis worsens
  • Nazis hold their first Nuremburg party rally

1928

  • Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s The threepenny opera premieres in Berlin
  • Hannes Meyer becomes the second director of the Bauhaus

1929

  • Street confrontations between the Nazis and communists in Berlin
  • Young Plan accepted, drastically reducing reparations
  • Stock market crashes on Wall Street, New York
  • Thomas Mann awarded the Nobel Prize for literature

1930

  • Resignation of Chancellor Hermann Müller’s cabinet ending parliamentary rule
  • Minority government formed by Heinrich Brüning, leader of the Centre Party
  • Nazis win 18% of the vote and gain 95 seats in the National elections
  • Ludwig Miles van der Rohe becomes the third director of the Bauhaus
  • John Heartfield creates photomontages for the Arbeiter‐Illustrierte Zeitung (AIZ)

1931

  • Unemployment reaches five million and a state of emergency is declared in Germany

1932

  • Nazis increase their representation in the Reichstag to 230 seats but are unable to form a majority coalition
  • Miles van der Rohe moves the Bauhaus to Berlin
  • Grosz relocates to New York in as an exile

1933

  • Hindenberg names Hitler as Chancellor
  • Hitler creates a dictatorship under the Nazi regime
  • The first Degenerate art exhibition denouncing modern art is held in Dresden
  • Miles van der Rohe announces the closure of the Bauhaus
  • Nazis organise book burnings in Berlin
  • Many artists including Gropius, Kandinski and Klee flee Germany
  • Beckmann, Dix and Schlemmer lose their teaching positions

1934

  • Fifteen concentration camps exist in Germany

1935

  • The swastika becomes the flag of the Reich

1936

  • Spanish civil war begins
  • Germany violates the Treaty of Versailles
  • Olympic Games held in Garmisch‐Partenkirchen and Berlin
  • Thomas Mann deprived of his citizenship and emigrates to the United States

1937

  • German bombing raids over Guernica in Spain in support of Franco
  • The Nazi’s Degenerate art exhibition opens in Munich and attracts two million visitors
  • Beckmann, Kirchner and Schwitters leave Germany
  • Purging of ‘degenerate art’ from German museums continues 1

 

1. Timeline credit: Chronology compiled by Jacqueline Strecker and Victoria Tokarowski from the following sources:

  • Catherine Heroy ‘Chronology’ in Sabine Rewald, Glitter and Doom: German portraits from the 1920s, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, exh cat, 2006, pp. 39‐46.
  • Anton Kaes, Martin Jay and Edward Dimendberg, eds, ‘Political chronology’, The Weimar Republic sourcebook, Berkely 1994, pp. 765‐71.
  • Jonathan Petropoulos and Dagmar Lott‐Reschke ‘Chronology’ in Stephanie Barron, ‘Degenerate Art’: the fate of the avant‐garde in Nazi Germany, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, exh cat, 1991, pp. 391‐401.

 

 

László Moholy-Nagy. ‘Bauhaus Balconies’ 1926

 

László Moholy-Nagy (American, born Hungary, 1895-1946)
Bauhaus Balconies
1926
Silver gelatin photograph

 

John Heartfield. 'Adolf, the superman: swallows gold and spouts rubbish' from the 'Workers Illustrated Paper', vol 11, no 29, 17 July 1932, p. 675

 

John Heartfield (German 1891-1968)
Adolf, the superman: swallows gold and spouts rubbish
1932
From the Workers Illustrated Paper, vol 11, no 29, 17 July 1932, p. 675
Photolithograph
38.0 x 27.0 cm
John Heartfield Archiv, Akademie der Künste zu Berlin
Photo: Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Kunstsammlung, Heartfield 2261/ Roman März
© The Heartfield Community of Heirs /VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. Licensed by Viscopy, Sydney

 

 

John Heartfield’s photomontages expose hidden agendas in German politics and economics of the 1920s and 30s. This image was published six months before the National Socialist Party came to power, and shows Hitler with a spine made of coins and his stomach filled with gold. The caption says that he ‘swallows gold’, alluding to generous funding by right-wing industrialists, and ‘spouts rubbish’.

 

Max Beckmann. 'The trapeze' 1923

 

Max Beckmann (German 1884-1950)
The trapeze
1923
Oil on canvas
196.5 x 84.0 cm
Toledo Museum of Art
Purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, Gift of Edward Drummond Libbey
Photo: Photography Incorporated, Toledo

 

 

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, a photographic archive and form of cultural memory, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

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