Posts Tagged ‘Australian Centre for Photography (ACP)

06
Aug
09

Exhibition: ‘Edward Burtynsky: Australian Minescapes’ at the Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney

Exhibition dates: 17th July – 22nd August 2009

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Jubilee Operations #1, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Jubilee Operations #1, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

 

All of these incredible, environmental aerial photographs – beauty, texture, pattern, fabric, scars, desecration, destruction, de/construction –  are works in the exhibition. The effects of the Anthropocene era in full swing. I will be glad when I am not here to see the fateful outcome of all of this: the death of most of the animals, and the sickness of the planet.

A travelling exhibition from the Western Australian Museum.

Marcus

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Many thankx to the Australian Centre for Photography for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Otter Juan Coronet Mine #1 Kalgoorlie, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Otter Juan Coronet Mine #1, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #1, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #1, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #2, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #2, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #3, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #3, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #5, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #5, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #11, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #11, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #12, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #12, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #14, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #14, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #15 Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #15, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Silver Lake Operations #16, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Silver Lake Operations #16, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

 

Edward Burtynsky is one of the world’s leading contemporary landscape photographers. His ‘manufactured landscapes’ have included stark images of recycling yards, mine tailings, quarries and refineries. This series of images, taken in the eastern goldfields and the Pilbara of Western Australia, continues Edward Burtynsky’s examination of natural landscapes modified by mankind in the pursuit of the raw materials required for our modern society.

“Our dependence on nature to provide the materials for our consumption and our concern for the health of our planet sets us into an uneasy contradiction. For me, these images function as reflecting pools of our times.”

Edward Burtynsky

Australian Minescapes is a new body of work by Burtynsky, commissioned for the FotoFreo 2008 Festival. For this exhibition a selection of images from his Shipyard images from China and Ship Breaking images from Bangladesh will be presented alongside his Australian Minescapes images.

Text from the Australian Centre for Photography website [Online] Cited 01/08/2009 no longer available online

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Super Pit #1, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Super Pit #1, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Super Pit #4 Kalgoorlie, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Super Pit #4, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

Edward Burtynsky. 'Tailings #1 Kalgoorlie, Western Australia' 2007

 

Edward Burtynsky (Canadian, b. 1955)
Tailings #1 Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
2007
Digital chromogenic colour photographic print
1560mm x 1260mm
Western Australian Museum

 

 

Australian Centre for Photography
21 Foley Street
Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010

Gallery Hours:
Tuesday to Friday 10am – 5pm
Saturday 11am – 4pm

Edward Burtynsky website

Australian Centre for Photography website

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26
May
09

Exhibition: ‘Inheritance’ at the Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney

Exhibition dates: 1st May – 6th June 2009

Artists: Bindi Cole, Tamara Dean, Lee Grant, June Indrefjord, Bronek Kozka, Ka-Yin Kwok, Tracey Moffatt, Fiona Morris, Aaron Seeto, Martin Smith and Toni Wilkinson

Installation photographs of the exhibition can be found on the Lee Grant – Photography blog website

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Many thankx to the ACP for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on some of the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

June Indrefjord. 'Piano' from the series Landaas 2005

 

June Indrefjord
Piano
2005
From the series Landaas

 

Aaron Seeto. 'Oblivion' 2006

 

Aaron Seeto
Oblivion
2006
From the series Oblivion
Daguerreotype

 

 

Aaron Seeto makes alternate historical positions and experiences visible through an exploration of archives, family photo albums and photographic records. In recent bodies of work Fortress and Oblivion, Seeto has utilised the daguerreotype, one of the earliest and most primitive photographic techniques, to highlight the malleability of narratives within archive records. Not only is the chemical process itself highly toxic and temperamental but the daguerreotype’s mirrored surface means the image appears as both positive and negative, depending on the angle of view. For Seeto, this mutability captures the essence of our experience of history and memory, reflecting how images degrade, how stories are formed and privileged, how knowledge and history are written. …

For his ongoing series Oblivion Seeto sourced details from images of the Cronulla riots – beachside riots around race and territory – of 2005 found on the internet. In reproducing these as daguerrotypes he seeks less to represent the incident than to look at how it was reported, understood and remembered. The instability of the virtual information found online is echoed in the photographic process.

Text from the Stills Gallery website [Online] Cited 14/02/2019

 

Tracey Moffatt. 'Useless 1974' 1994

 

Tracey Moffatt
Useless 1974
1994
From the series Scarred for Life

 

 

Useless, 1974 is a photo-lithograph by the Australian artist Tracey Moffatt. The work shows a girl stooping down to wash a car, with one hand wiping a headlight with a sponge and the other resting on the bonnet. She looks towards the camera rather than at the car, her face bearing a serious and potentially hurt or angry expression. The caption accompanying the photograph explains that ‘Her father’s nickname for her was “useless”‘. Despite this, it seems that in this picture she is being put to use, and perhaps the car she washes is her father’s. The caption, her expression and the direction of her gaze may suggest that the viewer occupies the position of the girl’s father looking down on and supervising his daughter while she carries out her chore. …

The work’s title is a reference to the cruel nickname given to the girl in the photograph, and the date in the title, 1974, suggests the year according to which the photograph has been styled by Moffatt, who employs actors and constructed scenes to create her photographs. Curator Filippo Maggia has compared Moffatt’s photographic method to that of a film director, stating that she ‘often does not take the photographs herself but directs a sort of bona fide movie set that she organises and controls after having pictured it in her mind again and again, meticulously decomposing and recomposing it’ (Maggia 2006, p.12). As the artist has stated, ‘I often use technicians when I make my pictures. I more or less direct them. I stand back and call the shots.’ (Quoted in Maggia 2006, p.12.)

Moffatt’s photographic series often deal with themes such as race, gender and the politics of identity. Drawing on memories from the artist’s childhood, the Scarred for Life series mimics photo spreads from the American magazine Life, with their explanatory captions and focus on the family environment. The captions’ terse descriptions hint at the traumatic stories behind the images. Moffatt has commented: ‘a person can make a passing comment to you when you are young and this can change you forever. You can be “scarred for life” but it isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The photographs can be read as both tragic and comic – there is a thin line between both.’ (Quoted in display caption, Tracey Moffatt, Birth Certificate 1994, Tate P78101, accessed 28 August 2015.) Furthermore, Maggia has argued that the Scarred for Life series ‘gives us life as it is, the harshness and aridity of human relations, adolescence with its fears of not being accepted’ (Maggia 2006, p.13).

Louise Hughes
August 2015

Filippo Maggia, Tracey Moffatt: Between Dreams and Reality, exhibition catalogue, Spazio Oberdan, Milan 2006, p. 13, reproduced p. 117.

Extract from Louise Hughes. “Useless, 1974,” on the Tate website [Online] Cited 14/02/2019

 

Lee Grant. 'The Day Meg Wore a Dress '2007

 

Lee Grant
The Day Meg Wore a Dress from the series Brothers and Sisters
2007

 

 

“You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family.”

 

From the tight nuclear unit to the multi-generational extended family, from refuges for the homeless to middle class suburbia, Inheritance examines the way our families shape the person we become; for better or for worse.

Taking Tracey Moffatt’s acclaimed series Scarred for Life as a starting point, the exhibition includes the work of eleven Australian artists who explore the modern family through a range of photographic disciplines, including documentary, portraiture and video. Sometimes serious and sometimes satirical, Inheritance is a family album that celebrates the skeletons and the psychodramas alongside the newborns and the nuptials.

Text from the Australian Centre for Photography website [Online] Cited 20/05/2009

 

Bindi Cole Wathaurung Mob 2008

 

Bindi Cole
Wathaurung Mob
2008
From the series Not really Aboriginal
Pigment print on rag paper
1035 x 1235cm

 

 

Our Past Is Our Strength – Culture and Identity

I’ve always been told that l was Aboriginal. I never questioned it because of the colour of my skin or where I lived. My Nan, one of the Stolen Generation, was staunchly proud and strong. She made me feel the same way. My traditional land takes in Ballarat, Geelong and Werribee and extends west past Cressy to Derrinallum. I’m from Victoria and I’ve always known this. All the descendants of traditional Victorian Aboriginal people are now of mixed heritage. I’m not black. I’m not from a remote community. Does that mean I’m not really Aboriginal? Or do Aboriginal people come in all shapes, sizes and colours and live in all areas of Australia, remote and urban?

Bindi Cole Wathaurung text from the Culture Victoria website [Online] Cited 14/02/2019

 

“Wathaurung Mob is a group portrait depicting members of Cole’s family sitting in their lounge room, their faces blackened with minstrel paint, and wearing red headbands traditionally worn by indigenous elders. The controversial practice of “blackfacing” refers to the populist minstrel shows of the 19th and 20th centuries in which a white actor put on blackface, then performed a racist caricature.

As we stand before the work, Alessi says he finds it confronting and uncomfortable. “Wathaurung Mob is quite powerful because what stands out are the eyes of each sitter; they look directly at the viewer, so you can’t help but feel challenged by that,” he says.

“There is also something quite uncomfortable about the work because, in some ways, you are being implicated in Andrew Bolt’s view, as white Australians having to own up to the broader history of the relationship between white and indigenous Australia.

“And more broadly it is about coming to grips with what is still a major issue in Australia around reconciliation and the way that we treat indigenous people. In one single frame this photograph captures 200 years of history, and I think it is an area that people like Bindi Cole are really courageous to navigate through because they have been open to criticism by people like Andrew Bolt, which is completely unfounded.””

Extract from Bronwyn Watson. “Facing up to the stereotypes,” on The Australian website November 16, 2013 [Online] Cited 14/02/2019

 

Fiona Morris. 'Sean and Jade, Wesley Mission' 2006

 

Fiona Morris
Sean and Jade, Wesley Mission
2006

 

Tamara Dean. 'Alex and Maeve' 2006

 

Tamara Dean
Alex and Maeve
2006

 

 

Australian Centre for Photography
ACP Project Space Gallery,
21 Foley St, Darlinghurst NSW 2010

Gallery Hours:
Tue-Fri 10.00am – 5.00pm
Sat 11.00am – 4.00pm

Australian Centre for Photography website

Lee Grant website

Tracey Moffatt on the Rosyln Oxley9 Gallery website

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17
Mar
09

Exhibition: ‘Hyper’ by Denis Darzacq at Australian Centre for Photography (ACP), Sydney

Exhibition dates: Friday 13th March – Sunday 12th April 2009

 

Denis Darzacq. 'Hyper #3' 2007

 

Denis Darzacq
Hyper #3
2007

 

 

These images form an interesting body of work: levitating bodies suspended between heaven and earth, neither here nor there, form a hyper-real image grounded in the context of the fluorescent isles of French supermarkets. The mainly anonymous humans look like mannequins in their inertness, frozen at the moment of throwing themselves/being thrown into the consumer environment. After his brilliant series La Chute (The Fall) Darzacq has taken people gathered in a casting call from around the town of Rouen and made their frozen bodies complicit in the mass production of the supermarket and the mass consumption of the image as tableaux vivant: the mise en scène directed by the photographer to limited effect. There is something unsettling about these images but ultimately they are unrewarding, as surface as the environment the bodies are suspended in, and perhaps this is the point.

Suspension of bodies is not a new idea in photography. Jacques Henri Lartigue used the freeze frame to good effect long before Henri Cartier-Bresson came up with his ‘decisive moment’: playing with the effect of speed and gravity in an era of Futurism, Lartigue used the arrested movement of instant photography then afforded by smaller cameras and faster film to capture the spirit of liberation in the ‘Belle Epoque’ period before the First World War.

“All the jumping and flying in Lartigue’s photographs, it looks like the whole world at the turn of the century is on springs or something. There’s a kind of spirit of liberation that’s happening at the time and Lartigue matches that up with what stop action photography can do at the time, so you get these really dynamic pictures. And for Lartigue part of the joke, most of the time, is that these people look elegant but they are doing these crazy stunts.”1

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One of the greatest, if not the greatest ever, series of photographs of levitating bodies is that by American photographer Aaron Siskind. Called Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation (sometimes reversed as Terrors and Pleasures of Levitation as on the George Eastman House website) the images feature divers suspended in mid-air with the sky as their blank, background canvas. The images formal construction makes the viewer concentrate on the state of the body, its positioning in the air, and the look on the face of some of the divers caught between joy and fear.

“Highly formal, yet concerned with their subject as well as the idea they communicate, the ‘Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation’ photographs depict the dark shapes of divers suspended mid-leap against a blank white sky. Shot with a hand-held twin-lens reflex camera at the edge of Lake Michigan in Chicago, the balance and conflict suggested by the series’ title is evident in the divers’ sublime contortions.”2

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Perhaps because of their air of balance and conflict we can return to these vibrant images again and again and they never loose their freshness, intensity and wonder. The same cannot be said of Denis Darzacq’s Hyper photographs. Slick and surface like the consumer society on which they comment the somnambulistic bodies are more like floating helium balloons, perhaps even tortured souls leaving the earth. Reminiscent of the magicians trick where the girl is suspended and a hoop passed around her body to prove the suspension is real these photographs really are more smoke and mirrors than any comment on the binary between being and having as some commentators (such as Amy Barrett-Lennard, Director Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts) have suggested. There is no spirit of liberation here, no sublime revelation as the seemingly lifeless bodies are trapped between the supermarket shelves, as oblivious to and as anonymous as the products that surround them. The well shot images perhaps possess a sense of fun, if I am being generous, as Darzacq plays with our understanding of reality… but are they more than that or is the Emperor just wearing very thin consumer clothing?

Dr Marcus Bunyan

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Many thankx to the Australian Centre for Photography for allowing me to publish the Darzacq photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image. All other images are used under “fair use” for the purpose of education, research and critical discourse.

 

  1. Kevin Moore (Lartigue biographer) quoted in “Genius of Photography,” on the BBC website [Online] Cited 15/03/2009
  2. Text from the Museum of Contemporary Photography website [Online] Cited 15/03/2009 (no longer available)

 

 

Denis Darzacq. 'Hyper #7' 2007

 

Denis Darzacq
Hyper #7
2007

 

 

“The astonishing photographs that make up Hyper involve no digital manipulation, just close collaboration between young dancers and sportspeople as they jump for the camera to form strange, exaggerated poses and body gestures. Denis Darzacq was drawn to the trashy, consumerist nature of the French Hypermarkets (the equivalent of our supermarkets) and the hyper coloured backgrounds they provided. These supermarkets offered a sharp juxtaposition to the sublime, almost-spiritual bodies that appear to float in their aisles.

Hyper is the latest series of works by French photographer Denis Darzacq, who continues to explore the place of the individual in society, a theme which has been crucial to his work in the last few years.”

Text from the ACP website [Online] Cited 15/03/2009 (no longer available online)

 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) 'L'envol de Bichonnade' 1905

 

Jacques Henri Lartigue
Bichonnade, 40, Rue Cortambert, Paris
1905

 

Jacques Henri Lartigue. 'Mr Folletete (Plitt) et Tupy, Paris, March 1912'

 

Jacques Henri Lartigue
Mr Folletete (Plitt) et Tupy, Paris, March 1912
1912

 

Jacques Henri Lartigue. 'Fuborg' 1929

 

Jacques Henri Lartigue
Fuborg
1929

 

Herni Cartier-Bresson. 'Behind Saint Lazare Station, Paris, France' 1932

 

Herni Cartier-Bresson
Behind Saint Lazare Station, Paris, France
1932

 

Aaron Siskind. 'Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #37' 1956

 

Aaron Siskind
Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #37
1956

 

siskind-pleasures-and-terrors-of-levitaiton-1956

 

Aaron Siskind
Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #63
1956

 

Aaron Siskind. 'Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #298' 1956

 

Aaron Siskind
Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #298
1956

 

Aaron Siskind. 'Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #99' 1956

 

Aaron Siskind
Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #99
1956

 

Aaron Siskind. 'Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #491' 1956

 

Aaron Siskind
Pleasures and Terrors of Levitation #491
1956

 

number-2

 

Denis Darzacq
Hyper #2
2007

 

Denis Darzacq. 'Hyper #13' 2007

 

Denis Darzacq
Hyper #13
2007

 

 

Australian Centre for Photography
21 Foley Street
Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010
Phone: +61 2 9332 0555

Project Space Gallery opening hours:
Tuesday to Friday 10am – 5pm
Saturday 11am – 4pm

Denis Darzacq website

Denis Darzacq Hyper images

Australian Centre for Photography (ACP) website

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, a photographic archive and form of cultural memory, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Orphans and small groups’ 1994-96 Part 2

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