Posts Tagged ‘William Eicholtz

21
May
11

Review: McClelland Sculpture Survey & Award 2010 at McClelland Gallery & Sculpture Park, Langwarrin, Victoria

Survey dates: 21 November 2010 – 17 July 2011

 

Adrian Mauriks. 'Strange fruit' 2010

 

Adrian Mauriks (Australian, b. 1942)
Strange fruit
2010
Epoxy resin, steel, paint

 

 

“[Massumi] posits ‘a physiology of perception’ in which he analyses sensory forms of knowledge as being driven by affect. Massumi understands affect as a moment of confrontation in which there are many possibilities, a moment embedded with potential responses, reactions and directions which is characterised by a sense of openness … narratives produced through affect are the result of the tensions and interplays between form and content or space and objects and the viewer.”

.
Kate Gregory and Andrea Witcomb1

 

 

Meandering around the trails of the McClelland Sculpture Park is a wonderful experience; the meandering provides the suspense and excitement of a treasure hunt. Unfortunately, viewing most of the sculptures of the McCelland Sculpture Survey Award 2010 that are the prize of such a treasure hunt left me a little disappointed. I had little feeling for most of the sculptures dotted around the landscape. As conceptual ideas I understood their rationale but most left me cold and emotionally unengaged – they had little affect upon me.

Embodied forms of knowledge production apprehended by the senses, such as affect, produce new forms of understanding. Emotional responses open up possibilities for interpretation. In this sense, affect is important for the maintenance and production of memory as well as social and cultural understanding. For the historian Dipesh Chakrabarty, it is the subjective, felt response that is the most relevant for contemporary forms of political, social and cultural engagement – how emotional responses open up possibilities for interpretation.2

“Narratives produced through affect are the result of the tensions and interplays between form and content or space and objects and the viewer.” I felt little of that tension and interplay when viewing most of these works.

While understanding that, for an award of this nature, the work has to be self-contained, has to sit in a particular environment that the artist has only a general idea of (not a particular position) when proposing the work – on the evidence of this survey it would seem that contemporary Australian sculpture tends towards one shot statements that lack nuance and layering in composition and meaning. An understanding of how the work inhabits space and the aura that the work projects is notably absent from most of the works. Most are exercises in design rather than aesthetically pleasing artworks, the design aspect of making art works for these competitions having taken over from making work that has an emotional connection to the viewer and relevance to the world in which we live. As evidence see the photographs below and note how many are seemingly masculine, square / oblong / totemic / monolithic structures, compositions that assume the viewer cannot decipher sensual, layered narratives that are revealed over time, through space. There is little music and pleasure to be had here!

Notable exceptions include the primordial, reflective eggs of Matthew Harding (Primordial, 2010, below); the wonderfully tactile, sensual, stitched bronze dogs of Caroline Rothwell (Tygers I, II, III, 2010, below); and the incongruously placed, limpid, distorted, rusting Holden HQ Kingswood Station Wagon by Jason Waterhouse (Glory Days, 2010, below) covered in pine needles that delighted, surprised and made me feel something (about the work, myself and the world we inhabit). This was my winner, hands down. The most unedifying experience of the afternoon was walking under the black table of the winner, Louise Paramor’s Top shelf (2010). While the “brilliant assemblage” looks acceptable from a distance, “the oversized table acts as an altar upon which the saccharine paraphernalia of a modern, disposable age sit as objects that have been elevated for aesthetic contemplation,”3 the underside through which the viewer walks was the most emotionally dead space I have had to endure when viewing contemporary art over the past few years.

Gregory and Witcomb observe, “sculpture gives shape to emptiness, to space, as much as to material form.” The space to produce new forms of understanding that offer the viewer fresh perspectives, that allow the viewer to have a openness and receptiveness to the sensuality of the work and it’s placement in and relationship to, the world. The space to breathe, to touch, to explore, to be excited, to create and bring forth memory, to bear witness to the engagement with our senses. We are the product of numerous interactions with our environment; this survey, rather than leaving me feeling uplifted and informed through these interactions, left me feeling rather dead and deflated.

In this sense I loved the landscape but I didn’t feel most of the art.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

 

  1. Gregory, K. and Witcomb, A. “Beyond Nostalgia: the Role of Affect in Generating Historical Understanding at Heritage Sites,” in, Knell, S.J., Macleod, S. and Watson, S. (eds.,). Museum Revolutions: How Museums Change and are Changed. New York: Routledge, 2007, pp. 264-265
  2. Ibid., p. 263
  3. Lindsay, Robert. Art and Nature/Nature and Art. [Online] Cited 15/05/2011. No longer available online

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All photographs © Marcus Bunyan. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

Adrian Mauriks. 'Strange fruit' 2010

 

Adrian Mauriks (Australian, b. 1942)
Strange fruit
2010
Epoxy resin, steel, paint

 

Alexander Knox. 'The mill' 2010

Alexander Knox. 'The mill' 2010

 

Alexander Knox (Australian, b. 1966)
The mill
2010
Galvanised steel, paint, timber

 

Caroline Rothwell. 'Tygers I, II, III' 2010

Caroline Rothwell. 'Tygers I, II, III' 2010

Caroline Rothwell. 'Tygers I, II, III' 2010

 

Caroline Rothwell (Australian, b. 1967 England)
Tygers I, II, III
2010
Bronze

 

Chaco Kato. 'A white nest: 2010' 2010

Chaco Kato. 'A white nest: 2010' 2010

 

Chaco Kato
A white nest: 2010
2010
Yarn, steel pegs

 

Colin Suggett. 'National Anxiety Index' 2010

Colin Suggett. 'National Anxiety Index' 2010 (detail)

 

Colin Suggett (Australian, b. 1945)
National Anxiety Index
2010
Steel, aluminium, fibreglass, paint, plastic

 

Daniel Clemmett. 'Development' 2010

Daniel Clemmett. 'Development' 2010

 

Daniel Clemmett
Development
2010
Recycled steel

 

Dean Colls. 'Alexander the Great' 2010

Dean Colls. 'Alexander the Great' 2010

 

Dean Colls
Alexander the Great
2010
Corten steel

 

Greg Johns. 'To the centre II' 2007

Greg Johns. 'To the centre II' 2007

 

Greg Johns (Australian, b. 1953)
To the centre II
2007
Corten steel

 

James Parrett. 'M-fifteen' 2010

James Parrett. 'M-fifteen' 2010

 

James Parrett
M-fifteen
2010
Stainless steel

 

Jason Waterhouse. 'Glory days' 2010

Jason Waterhouse. 'Glory days' 2010

Jason Waterhouse. 'Glory days' 2010

 

Jason Waterhouse
Glory days
2010
1972 Holden HQ Kingswood Station Wagon, acrylic filler, steel, paint

 

John Eiseman. 'Watching and waiting' 2010

 

John Eiseman
Watching and waiting
2010
Bronze

 

Jud Wimhurst. 'A moment of media-tation' 2010

Jud Wimhurst. 'A moment of media-tation' 2010

 

Jud Wimhurst
A moment of media-tation
2010
Wood, plywood, acrylic lacquers, 2 pac paint, mirror, polycarbonate, polyurethane resin, polyester resin, epoxy resin, fibreglass, acrylic fresnel lenses

 

Matt Calvert. 'Night imp' 2010

Matt Calvert. 'Night imp' 2010

 

Matt Calvert (Australian, b. 1969)
Night imp
2010
Aluminium, toughened glass

 

Matthew Harding. 'Primordial' 2010

Matthew Harding. 'Primordial' 2010

 

Matthew Harding (Australian, 1964-2018)
Primordial
2010
Mirror polished stainless steel

 

Robbie Rowlands. 'Fell for silo' 2010

Robbie Rowlands. 'Fell for silo' 2010

 

Robbie Rowlands (Australian, b. 1968)
Fell for silo
2010
Felled pine tree, decommissioned steel grain silo

 

William Eicholtz. 'At the altar of Terspichore' 2010

William Eicholtz. 'At the altar of Terspichore' 2010

 

William Eicholtz (Australian, b. 1962)
At the altar of Terspichore
2010
Polymer cement, synthetic glaze

 

 

McClelland Gallery & Sculpture Park
390 McClelland Drive
Langwarrin, Victoria
3910 Australia

Opening hours:
Tues to Sun 10am – 5pm
Closed on Mondays and some Public Holidays

McClelland Gallery & Sculpture Park website

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24
Jun
10

Sculpture: ‘Drawing Water’ (2010) by Fredrick White

June 2010

 

Fredrick White. 'Drawing Water' 2010

 

Fredrick White
Drawing Water
2010

 

 

My best friend, Australian sculpture Fredrick White, has been commissioned to create two public sculptures in Western Queensland. The first has been completed at Thargomindah (see Google map), a town located 1014 km west of Brisbane and was commissioned by artplusplace and Thargomindah Regional Council. In a small town of 250 people this is the town’s first public sculpture.

“The town’s one claim to fame is its artesian bore. The bore, which lies 2 km out of town on the Noccundra road, was drilled in 1891 and by 1893, having drilled to a depth of 795 metres, the water came to the surface. It was then that the town successfully attempted a unique experiment. The pressure of the bore water was used drive a generator which supplied the town’s electricity. Enthusiasts have described this as Australia’s first hydro-electricity scheme. The system operated until 1951. Today the bore still provides the town’s water supply. The water reaches the surface at 84°C.”

Text from the Sydney Morning Herald travel website February 8, 2004 [Online] Cited 17/08/2019

 

The work Drawing Water (2010) addresses the need for water in such an arid location and the numerous bores that are sunk around the town to draw water to the surface. The earth is reflected in the sky and the sky in the earth in the central polished stainless steel disks (as friend Perry observes, like a tunnel connecting earth and heaven). A forest of bore pipes surround the central platform. Of the work Fred says:

“‘Drawing Water’ speaks of our connection to the Earth, specifically the Great Artesian Basin and the bores that provide the only continuous source of water throughout much of inland Australia. The 52 galvanised poles symbolise not only our year round need for water but are also as a reminder of how extensively taped the artesian water is.”

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It is a wonderfully balanced and thoughtful work that has great presence and beauty.

The next commission is at Blackall in Western Queensland (see Google map). A drawing of the work Lifespan (2010), which is 8 metres long, is at the bottom of the posting. Blackall already contains public sculptures by William Eicholtz (Towners Call – Edgar Towner V.C. Memorial (2009)) and Robert Bridgewater (Wool, Water and Wood (2008)).

Dr Marcus Bunyan for Art Blart

 

Fredrick White. 'Drawing Water' 2010

 

Fredrick White
Drawing Water
2010

 

Fredrick White. 'Drawing Water' (detail) 2010

Fredrick White. 'Drawing Water' (detail) 2010

Fredrick White. 'Drawing Water' (detail) 2010

 

Fredrick White
Drawing Water (details)
2010

 

'Lifespan' (2010), drawing for commission at Blackall, Queensland

 

Fredrick White
Lifespan
2010
Drawing for commission at Blackall, Queensland

 

 

Fredrick White Sculpture website

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, a photographic archive and form of cultural memory, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Dogs, chickens, cattle’ 1994-95

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