Posts Tagged ‘Barbara Hepworth Sea Form (Porthmeor)

04
Mar
23

Exhibition: ‘Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium’ at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 4th November 2022 – 13th March 2023

Curators: Lesley Harding and Kendrah Morgan

 

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939/1961

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sculpture with Colour and Strings
1939/1961
Bronze, string
19 x 25 x 18cm
Ingram Collection, London, Barbara Hepworth
© Bowness

 

 

Out of balance or, how to kill the love for an artist in one easy lesson

I have always had an innate, incendiary love for the work of British artist Barbara Hepworth ever since I first saw her work in books and online, especially the stunning string sculptures full of tensioned negative and positive space. Therefore, I was so excited to visit Heide Museum of Modern Art to see my first Hepworth exhibition in the flesh. The work itself was as superb as I knew it would be, but the installation of it totally ruined my feeling for the art.

Usually when I write about art I follow the maxim if you can’t say anything positive, don’t say anything at all. A good principle to follow. But here I am having to write not about the art but its installation in the gallery spaces which crushed the soul – of the work and of this viewer.

The salient points are thus:

1/ Stygian gloom in the main gallery, so dark the sculptures were drained of life. Why? They are not going to fade being made of bronze and wood! And the iPhone images in this posting are, as usual, way too bright, about 3 times brighter than it actually was…

2/ Two thirds of the small sculptures were encased in Perspex casting shadows over them which again drained them of any “presence”. Walking around the main gallery I felt like I was all at sea, the Titanic surrounded by sea of floating icebergs, afraid of stepping backwards for fear of knocking into one of the plinths and the sculpture being sunk without trace. There was no room, or light, or “air” to let the sculptures actually breathe…

3/ The small galleries at the end of the main galleries hung with drab, overpowering floor to ceiling curtains. I felt like I was in a cheap multiplex cinema. The sculptures were asymmetrically placed in the spaces so you could not see them in the round there being only a foot or so to walk between the plinth and the curtains. Ridiculous.

4/ And in the second gallery (and this was the worst), poo brown walls which clashed terribly with the work… She lived and worked in St Ives for gods’s sake = light, bright, sea, clouds, energy – not poo brown shock, horror

.
The late Dame Barbara Hepworth was not an average British artist living in St Ives. She never set foot in Australia but her work has surely been murdered here, leaving her rolling in her grave. As an artist friend of mine said on the Art Blart Facebook page: ‘What a missed opportunity’

I sadly concur with that sentiment.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

.
All installation photographs by Marcus Bunyan. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

Gallery one

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Spring' 1966 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Spring' 1966 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Spring (installation views)
1966
Bronze, paint and string
Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6] 1940; and at right Eidos 1947
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6]' 1940 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) [6] (installation views)
1940
Plaster, paint and string
Private collection, United Kingdom
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Eidos' 1947 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Eidos' 1947 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Eidos' 1947 (installation view)

 

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Eidos (installation views)
1947
Portland stone and paint
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Purchased with the assistance of the Samuel E. Wills Bequest to commemorate the retirement of Dr E. Westbrook, Director of Arts for Victoria 1981
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Curved Form (Wave II) 1959; and at right Eidos 1947
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Curved Form (Wave II)' 1959 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Curved Form (Wave II)' 1959 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Curved Form (Wave II) (installation views)
1959
Bronze and steel
The State Art Collection, The Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
Purchased 1963
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

The doyenne of modernist sculpture, Barbara Hepworth was one of the leading British artists of her generation and the first woman sculptor to achieve international recognition. The first exhibition of her work in Australia, Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium brings together more than forty works from prestigious international and national collections, including sculptures in stone, wood, bronze and other metals and a select group of paintings. Introducing Australian audiences to her remarkable oeuvre, the exhibition has been developed in consultation with the Hepworth Estate and has been designed by award-winning architecture firm Studio Bright.

Married to the painter Ben Nicholson, from 1938 to 1951, Hepworth was a central figure in a network of major international abstract artists and closely linked with the School of Paris. From 1939 she was based in the creative community of St Ives, Cornwall, where she drew much inspiration from the natural environment. An early practitioner of the avant-garde method of direct carving, which dispensed with the tradition of preparatory models or maquettes, she later made large-scale cast and constructed sculptures. Her pioneering practice and technique of piercing the form had an enduring influence on the development of new sculptural vocabularies.

The exhibition demonstrates the shift in Hepworth’s approach from figurative and naturalistic to increasingly simplified and abstract forms. Though concerned with abstraction, she created work that was predominantly about relationships: between the human figure and the landscape; between forms presented side-by-side; between colour and texture; and between individuals and groups of people.

Text from the Heide Museum of Modern Art website

 

Gallery 1 continued…

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Disc with Strings (Moon)' 1969 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Disc with Strings (Moon)' 1969 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Disc with Strings (Moon)' 1969 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Disc with Strings (Moon) (installation views)
1969
Aluminium and string
Private collection, Oxford, United Kingdom
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Sculptures with strings wall text

 

Sculptures with strings wall text

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Orpheus (Maquette 2) Version II' 1956 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Orpheus (Maquette 2) Version II' 1956 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Orpheus (Maquette 2) Version II' 1956 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Orpheus (Maquette 2) Version II (installation views)
1956, 1959 edition, edition 1/3
Brass and string on wooden base
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
Purchased 1959

 

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at front Stringed Figure (Curlew) (Maquette) 1956; and at rear Maquette for Winged Figure 1957
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Stringed Figure (Curlew) (Maquette)' 1956 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Stringed Figure (Curlew) (Maquette)' 1956 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Stringed Figure (Curlew) (Maquette) (installation views)
1956
Brass and string on wooden base
Private collection, United Kingdom
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for Winged Figure' 1957 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for Winged Figure' 1957 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Maquette for Winged Figure (installation views)
1957
Brass and string on wooden base
British Council Collection, London
Purchased 1960
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sculpture with Colour and Strings' 1939 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sculpture with Colour and Strings (installation views)
1939, cast 1961, edition 1/9
Bronze and string
The Ingram Collection of Modern British Art, London
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Landscape Sculpture' 1944 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Landscape Sculpture' 1944 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Landscape Sculpture' 1944 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Landscape Sculpture' 1944 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Landscape Sculpture (installation views)
1944, cast 1961
Bronze on bronze base
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Early Years: Towards Abstraction wall text

 

Early Years: Towards Abstraction wall text

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Kneeling Figure' 1932 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Kneeling Figure (installation view)
1932
Rosewood
The Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire
Wakefield Council Permanent Art Collection
Purchased with aid from the Wakefield Permanent Art Fund (Friend of Wakefield Art Galleries and Museums,) V&A Purchase Grant Fund and Wakefield Girls’ High School 1944
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Three Forms (Carving in Grey Alabaster) 1935; at centre Mother and Child 1934; and at right Pierced Hemisphere II 1937-1938
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Three Forms (Carving in Grey Alabaster)' 1935 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Three Forms (Carving in Grey Alabaster)' 1935 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Three Forms (Carving in Grey Alabaster) (installation views)
1935
Alabaster on marble base
Tate, London
Presented by the executors of the artist’s estate, in accordance with her wishes 1980
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Mother and Child' 1934 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Mother and Child (installation view)
1934
Pink Ancaster stone
The Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire
Wakefield Council Permanent Art Collection
Purchased by Wakefield Corporation 1951
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Hemisphere II' 1937-1938 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Hemisphere II' 1937-1938 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Hemisphere II' 1937-1938 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Pierced Hemisphere II (installation views)
1937-1938
Hoptonwood stone on Portland stone base
Tate, London
Accepted by HM Government in lieu of inheritance tax and allocated to Tate 2004
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Hemisphere II' 1937-1938 (installation view)

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at front Pierced Hemisphere II 1937-1938; at background left Conicoid 1937; and at background right Pierced Round Form 1959-1960
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Conicoid' 1937 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Conicoid' 1937 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Conicoid' 1937 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Conicoid' 1937 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Conicoid' 1937 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Conicoid (installation views)
1937
Teak
Leeds Museums and Galleries, Leeds, United Kingdom
Purchased from the artist 1943
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Round Form' 1959-1960 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Round Form' 1959-1960 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Pierced Round Form' 1959-1960 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Pierced Round Form (installation views)
1959-1960
Bronze on wooden base
British Council Collection, London
Purchased 1960
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Figure' 1933 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Figure' 1933 (installation view)

 

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Figure (installation views)
1933
Alabaster on slate base
Tate, London
Lent from a private collection 2016
On long term loan
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Rock Face' 1973 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Rock Face' 1973 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Rock Face (installation views)
1973
Ancaster stone on beechwood base
Tate, London
Bequeathed by the artist 1976
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Heads' 1932 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Heads' 1932 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Two Heads (installation views)
1932
Cumberland alabaster
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for 'The Unknown Political Prisoner' 1952 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for 'The Unknown Political Prisoner' 1952 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for 'The Unknown Political Prisoner' 1952 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for 'The Unknown Political Prisoner' 1952 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette for 'The Unknown Political Prisoner' 1952 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)

Maquette for ‘The Unknown Political Prisoner’ (Truth)
1952
Mahogany
Tate, London
Accepted by HM Government in lieu of inheritance tax and allocated to Tate 2005

Maquette for ‘The Unknown Political Prisoner’ (Prisoner)
1952
Beechwood and iron
Tate, London
Accepted by HM Government in lieu of inheritance tax and allocated to Tate 2005

Maquette for ‘The Unknown Political Prisoner’ (Knowledge)
1952
Mahogany
Tate, London
Collection of the Lucas family, United Kingdom

(installation views)
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Corinthos' 1954-1955 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Corinthos (installation views)
1954-1955
Guarea wood and paint on wooden base
Tate, London
Purchased 1962
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Heide Museum presents first major Australian survey of pioneering modernist British sculptor Barbara Hepworth

Heide Museum of Modern Art today announced the first major survey in Australia of the celebrated British artist Dame Barbara Hepworth DBE (1903-1975). A leading figure of modernist sculpture in Britain in the 20th century, Hepworth is best known for her abstract sculptures and pioneering method of ‘piercing’ the form. Presented at Heide from 5 November 2022 to 13 March 2023, the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium brings together more than forty works from significant international and national collections, introducing Australian audiences to Hepworth’s enduring oeuvre and remarkable story.

Presented throughout Heide’s main galleries, the exhibition charts the trajectory of Hepworth’s artistic career. From early figurative marble carvings through to large-scale purely abstract forms, the exhibition will feature works on loan from the the collections of Tate Britain, Hepworth Wakefield and the British Council, as well as prominent Australian and New Zealand public collections including the National Gallery of Victoria, Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of New South Wales, and Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand.

Heide Museum of Modern Art Director Lesley Harding said: “It is with great pleasure that Heide brings together works by one of the most important artists of the 20th century, many never-before-seen here in Australia. The exhibition reflects our commitment to foregrounding modernist women artists, and is the result of extensive research and support from national and international organisations and the Hepworth Estate.”

A key figure of the abstract art movement in Britain, Hepworth’s pioneering practice enriched the language of modern sculpture. While the artist’s early works featured figurative and naturalistic forms, her sculptures would become increasingly simplified and abstract. Highlighted in the exhibition is Hepworth’s significant exploration of the tension between mass and negative space, with sculptures that are ‘pierced’ by large holes. This technique of piercing the form exemplifies Hepworth’s revolutionary contribution to the development of new sculptural vocabularies that influenced not only her contemporaries, but future generations of sculptors.

Heide Museum of Modern Art Head Curator Kendrah Morgan said: “A true pioneer, Barbara Hepworth’s contribution to the evolution of modern art cannot be underestimated. Hepworth’s combination of modernist reductive form and timeless materials produces its own particular magic.”

Heide has enlisted award-winning Melbourne-based architecture practice Studio Bright to design the exhibition, with a focus on connecting the museum’s inside galleries to the surrounding landscape. Central to Hepworth’s practice was the influence of nature, with the artist inspired by the coastal landscape of St Ives in Cornwall, where she lived and worked for much of her career. From the movement of tides to the ancient standing stones of west Cornwall, the artist’s later sculptures are grounded in references to patterns and forms found in nature.

Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium brings together more than forty artworks by British artist Barbara Hepworth, in what is a rare chance for Australian audiences to experience a major survey of one of the world’s greatest woman sculptors.

Press release from Heide Museum of Modern Art

 

Gallery two

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Sea Form (Porthmeor) 1958; and at right Twin Forms in Echelon 1961
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sea Form (Porthmeor)' 1958 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sea Form (Porthmeor)' 1958 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Sea Form (Porthmeor)' 1958 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sea Form (Porthmeor) (installation views)
1958
Bronze on bronze base on wood veneer base
Tate, London
Presented by the artist 1967
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Twin Forms in Echelon' 1961 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Twin Forms in Echelon' 1961 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Twin Forms in Echelon' 1961 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Twin Forms in Echelon' 1961 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Twin Forms in Echelon' 1961 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Twin Forms in Echelon (installation views)
1961, edition of 7
Bronze
The State Art Collection, The Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
Purchased 1979
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Later Works: Figures in the Landscape wall text

 

Later Works: Figures in the Landscape wall text

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Forms in Movement (Galliard)' 1956 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Forms in Movement (Galliard) (installation view)
1956
Copper and bronze
Wairarapa Cultural Collection
Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History, Masterton, New Zealand
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Head (Ra)' 1971 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Head (Ra)' 1971 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Head (Ra) (installation views)
1971
Bronze on wooden base
Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide
Gift of Lesley Lynn through the Art Gallery of South Australia Foundation, in memory of her husband Dr Kenneth Lynn 2001
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at centre Twin Forms in Echelon 1961; and at right Maquette (Variation on a Theme) and Figure (Oread) both 1958
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Maquette (Variation on a Theme) 1958; and at right Figure (Oread) 1958
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Maquette (Variation on a Theme)' 1958 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Maquette (Variation on a Theme) (installation view)
1958
Bronze on a wooden base
British Council Collection, London
Purchased 1950
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Figure (Oread)' 1958 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Figure (Oread) (installation view)
1958
Bronze
British Council Collection, London
Purchased 1950
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Figures (Menhirs)' 1964 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Figures (Menhirs)' 1964 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Figures (Menhirs)' 1964 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Two Figures (Menhirs)' 1964 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Two Figures (Menhirs) (installation views)
1964
Slate on wooden base
Tate, London
Purchased 1964
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation view of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne showing at left Oval form (Trezion) 1964; and at right Single Form (Chûn Quoit) 1961
Photo: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Oval form (Trezion)' 1964 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Oval form (Trezion)' 1964 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Oval form (Trezion)' 1964 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Oval form (Trezion) (installation views)
1964
Bronze on wooden base
Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand, Wellington
Purchased with assistance from the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council of New Zealand, Contemporary Art Society, London, and Lindsay Buick Bequest funds 1964
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Single Form (Chûn Quoit)' 1961 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Single Form (Chûn Quoit)' 1961 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Single Form (Chûn Quoit) (installation views)
1961
Bronze, edition of 7
The Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire
Wakefield Council Permanent Art Collection
On loan from the Hepworth Estate
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Group of Three Magic Stones' 1973 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Group of Three Magic Stones' 1973 (installation view)

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) 'Group of Three Magic Stones' 1973 (installation view)

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Group of Three Magic Stones (installation views)
1973
Silver on ebony base
Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
Bequest of Priaulx Rainier 1986
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975) short biography

Barbara Hepworth, in full Dame Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth, (born January 10, 1903, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England – died May 20, 1975, St. Ives, Cornwall), sculptor whose works were among the earliest abstract sculptures produced in England. Her lyrical forms and feeling for material made her one of the most influential sculptors of the mid-20th century.

Fascinated from early childhood with natural forms and textures, Hepworth decided at age 15 to become a sculptor. In 1919 she enrolled in the Leeds School of Art, where she befriended fellow student Henry Moore. Their lifelong friendship and reciprocal influence were important factors in the parallel development of their careers.

Hepworth’s earliest works were naturalistic with simplified features. Purely formal elements gradually gained greater importance for her until, by the early 1930s, her sculpture was entirely abstract. Works such as Reclining Figure (1932) resemble rounded biomorphic forms and natural stones; they seem to be the fruit of long weathering instead of the hard work with a chisel they actually represent. In 1933 Hepworth married (her second husband; the first was the sculptor John Skeaping) the English abstract painter Ben Nicholson, under whose influence she began to make severe, geometric pieces with straight edges and immaculate surfaces.

As Hepworth’s sculpture matured during the late 1930s and ’40s, she concentrated on the problem of the counterplay between mass and space. Pieces such as Wave (1943-1944) became increasingly open, hollowed out, and perforated, so that the interior space is as important as the mass surrounding it. Her practice, increasingly frequent in her mature pieces, of painting the works’ concave interiors further heightened this effect, while she accented and defined the sculptural voids by stretching strings taut across their openings.

During the 1950s Hepworth produced an experimental series called Groups, clusters of small anthropomorphic forms in marble so thin that their translucence creates a magical sense of inner life. In the next decade she was commissioned to do a number of sculptures approximately 20 feet (6 metres) high. Among the more successful of her works in this gigantic format is the geometric Four-Square (Walk Through) (1966).

“Barbara Hepworth,” on the Britannica website Last Updated: Jan 6, 2023 [Online] Cited 13/02/2023

 

Descending walk way

 

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

Installation view of the exhibition 'Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium' at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne

 

Installation views of the exhibition Barbara Hepworth: In Equilibrium at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne
Photos: Marcus Bunyan

 

 

Heide Museum of Modern Art
7, Templestowe Road
Bulleen, Victoria 3105

Opening hours:
(Heide II and Heide III)
Tuesday – Sunday 10.00am – 5.00pm

Heide Museum of Modern Art website

LIKE ART BLART ON FACEBOOK

Back to top

21
Oct
15

Exhibition: ‘Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World’ at Tate Britain, London

Exhibition dates: 24th June – 25th October 2015

Linbury Galleries

 

 

Sculptor Barbara Hepworth

 

Sculptor Barbara Hepworth

 

 

A national treasure. An old soul.

My favourite period of Hepworth’s is the 1940s-1950s, when she found her true voice as an artist. Working with wood, inspired by the landscape, she carved into the space of form / the form of space. She was a master of inner space. The sculptures with string are like harps, they resonate with the energy of life, sea, rock, wind and become … oracles, evidencing some deep inner knowledge. My god, what an artist. Underrated by some but to those that know, a magical voice of becoming.

Marcus

.
Many thankx to the Tate for allowing me to publish the art works in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

 

Barbara Hepworth banner

 

Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World exhibition banner

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Discs in Echelon' 1935

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Discs in Echelon
1935
Padouk wood
311 x 491 x 225mm
Museum of Modern Art, New York
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Doves (Group)' 1927

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Doves (Group)
1927
Parian marble
Manchester Art Gallery
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Large and Small Form' 1934

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Large and Small Form
1934
White alabaster
250 x 450 x 240mm
The Pier Arts Centre Collection, Orkney
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Mother and Child' 1934

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Mother and Child
1934
Cumberland alabaster
230 x 455 x 189mm, 11.1 kg
Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1993© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Pelagos' 1946

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Pelagos
1946
Elm and strings on oak
430 x 460 x 385mm
Tate
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

 

Pelagos (‘sea’ in Greek) was inspired by a view of the bay at St Ives in Cornwall, where two arms of land enfold the sea on either side. The hollowed-out wood has a spiral formation resembling a shell, a wave or the roll of a hill. Hepworth wanted the taut strings to express ‘the tension I felt between myself and the sea, the wind or the hills’. She moved to Cornwall with her husband Ben Nicholson in 1939, and produced some of her finest sculpture in its wild landscape.

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Oval Sculpture (No. 2)' 1943, cast 1958

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Oval Sculpture (No. 2)
1943, cast 1958
Plaster on wooden base
293 x 400 x 255mm
Tate
Presented by the artist 1967

 

 

In the 1930s Barbara Hepworth and her husband Ben Nicholson were members of the London-based avant-garde. Shortly before the outbreak of war they moved to Cornwall with their children. Running a nursery school and living in cramped conditions reduced Hepworth’s output of sculpture to a minimum. In 1943, the family moved to larger accommodation with studio space. Hepworth’s abstract forms, which seem akin to caves and shells, were affected by the Cornish landscape. Her response to nature was not romantic or mystical but more firmly based on actual observation. Circles and spheres had dominated her work. These were replaced by ovals which gave her sculptures two centres rather than one, complicating their interior form.

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) (6)' 1943

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sculpture with Colour (Deep Blue and Red) (6)
1943
© The Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Red in Tension' 1941

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Red in Tension
1941
Pencil and gouache on paper
254 x 355mm
Private collection
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Group I (Concourse) February 4 1951' 1951

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Group I (Concourse) February 4 1951
1951
Serravezza marble
248 x 505 x 295mm
19 kg
Bequeathed by Miss E.M. Hodgkins 1977
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

 

Tate Britain will open the first London museum retrospective for five decades of the work of Barbara Hepworth, one of Britain’s greatest artists. Barbara Hepworth (1903-75) was a leading figure of the international modern art movement in the 1930s, and one of the most successful sculptors in the world during the 1950s and 1960s. This major retrospective opens on 24 June 2015 and will emphasise Hepworth’s often overlooked prominence in the international art world. It will highlight the different contexts and spaces in which Hepworth presented her work, from the studio to the landscape.

The exhibition will feature over 70 works by Hepworth from major carvings and bronzes to less-familiar works and those by other artists. It opens with Hepworth’s earliest surviving carvings from the 1920s alongside works by predecessors and peers artists from Jacob Epstein to Henry Moore. The selection reveals how her work related to a wider culture of wood and stone carving between the wars when Hepworth studied at Leeds Art School and at the Royal College of Art.

Hepworth and her second husband Ben Nicholson made works in dialogue and photographed their studio in Hampstead, London in order to reinforce the idea of a common practice integrated into a way of life. Major carvings like Kneeling Figure, 1932 (rosewood) and Large and Small Form, 1934 (alabaster) will be shown with paintings, prints and drawings by Nicholson, and rarely seen works by Hepworth including textiles, drawings, collages and photograms. Archival photographs will show the two artists and their works in the studio demonstrating their integrated life of art and craft.

In the later 1930s, Hepworth made more purely abstract work as part of an international movement disseminated through magazines and exhibitions. A display of the majority of Hepworth’s surviving carvings of this period will include Discs in Echelon 1935 (padouk wood) and Single Form 1937 (lignum vitae) which will be seen in conjunction with the journals in which they featured alongside the work of artists such as Alberto Giacometti and Piet Mondrian.

In the mid-1940s, Hepworth, in St Ives, Cornwall, began making sculptures in wood that expressed her response to her new surroundings. These will be set alongside her two-dimensional work: the abstract works on paper of the early 1940s and her figurative ‘hospital drawings’ of 1947-48, both expressing utopian ideals. A selection of photographs and film  will consider the different ways in which Hepworth’s sculpture was presented or imagined – in landscape, in a gallery, in the garden and on stage – and the impact such variant stagings have on the work’s interpretation.

One room will reunite four large carvings in the sumptuous African hardwood guarea, made in 1954-5, which are probably the highpoint of Hepworth’s carving career. In the post-war period, Hepworth’s sculpture became a prominent part of the international art scene. This will be evoked through a focus on her retrospective at the Kröller-Müller Museum in 1965 and the display of bronzes that inaugurated the Museum’s reconstructed Rietveld Pavilion.

Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World is curated by Penelope Curtis, Director, Tate Britain and Chris Stephens, Lead Curator, Modern British Art and Head of Displays with Assistant Curator Inga Fraser and Sophie Bowness, the artist’s granddaughter. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. It will tour to the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo in the Netherlands from November 2015 to April 2016 and to the Arp Museum, Rolandseck in Germany from May to August 2016.

Press release from the Tate Britain website

 

 

 

Barbara Hepworth at Tate Britain

Barbara Hepworth helped to reshape sculpture in post-war Britain, experimenting with abstract forms and piercing holes through her works to play with light and shade. Alastair Sooke takes a look at Tate Britain’s remarkable retrospective which displays magnificent bronzes and intimate, personal carvings.

 

 

 

Barbara Hepworth – Figures in a Landscape (1953) – extract

Narrated by future Poet Laureate Cecil Day Lewis, Figures in a Landscape offers a poetic portrait of sculptor Barbara Hepworth and the otherworldly Cornwall landscapes that inspired her work. Priaulx Rainier’s haunting score beautifully complements the extraordinary works of art, placed in the Cornish spaces that influenced them. Hepworth had been commissioned to design sculptures for the Festival of Britain two years before this film, and remains one of Britain’s most celebrated sculptors – she was made a Dame in 1965. She died during a fire at her St. Ives studio in 1975.

~ Alex Davidson

 

 

 

Barbara Hepworth’s Sculpture Garden | TateShots

Barbara Hepworth first came to live in Cornwall with her husband Ben Nicholson and their young family at the outbreak of war in 1939. She lived and worked in Trewyn studios, now the Hepworth Museum, from 1949 until her death in 1975.

TateShots travelled to St Ives to explore the studio and its gardens, where Hepworth’s sculptures are seen in the environment for which they were created. ‘Finding Trewyn Studio was a sort of magic’, wrote Hepworth; ‘here was a studio, a yard and garden where I could work in open air and space’. The film includes archival footage from an interview with the artist from 1973.

 

 

Who is Barbara Hepworth?

3 June 2015

 

Who is she?

Barbara Hepworth was a British sculptor, who was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire in 1903. She was a leading figure in the international art scene throughout a career spanning five decades.

 

Who were her peers?

Hepworth studied at Leeds school of Art from 1920-1921 alongside fellow Yorkshire-born artist Henry Moore. Both students continued their studies in sculpture at the Royal College of Art in London. Both became leading practitioners of the avant-garde method of Direct Carving (working directly in to the chosen material) avoiding the more traditional process of making preparatory models and maquettes from which a craftsman would produce the finished work.

From 1924 Hepworth spent two years in Italy, and in 1925 married her first husband, the artist John Skeaping, in Florence; their marriage was to last until 1931.

From 1932, she lived with the painter Ben Nicholson and, for a number of years, the two artists made work in close proximity to each other, developing a way of working that was almost like a collaboration. They spent periods of time travelling throughout Europe, and it was here that Hepworth met Georges Braque and Piet Mondrian, and visited the studios of Picasso, Constantin Brancusi, and Jean Arp and Sophie Taueber-Arp. The experience was a hugely exciting one for Hepworth, for she not only found herself in the studios of some of Europe’s most influential artists, which helped her to approach her own career with renewed vigour and clarity, but also found there mutual respect. The School of Paris had a lasting effect on both Hepworth and Nicholson as they became key figures in an international network of abstract artists.

By now married and with triplets as well as a son from her first marriage, when war broke out in 1939, Hepworth and Nicholson moved to St Ives. Though she didn’t know it, the seaside town would remain her home for their rest of her life, and after the war she and Nicholson became a hub for a generation of younger emerging British artists such as Peter Lanyon, Roger Hilton and Terry Frost – who was Hepworth’s studio assistant for a time. As she had found, the wild beauty of the surrounding terrain offered a counter to the disruption and destruction of the war. And, like her, those artists made paintings and sculptures inspired by the place and the forces and their experience of nature.

Though concerned with form and abstraction, Hepworth’s art was primarily about relationships: not merely between two forms presented side-by-side, but between the human figure and the landscape, colour and texture, and most importantly between people at an individual and social level.

 

What’s her legacy?

Barbara Hepworth’s name is still intertwined with the history and culture of St Ives and her studio and sculpture Garden remain one of the town’s most popular destinations. In the town where Hepworth was born, as well as housing a rich archive of the artist’s work and serving as a platform for contemporary artists working today, The Hepworth Wakefield also pays lasting homage to an artist who spoke frequently of the effect her surroundings had on her formative years.

The whole of this Yorkshire background means more to me as the years have passed. I draw on these early experiences not only visually in texture and contour, but humanly. The importance of man in landscape was stressed by the seeming contradiction of the industrial town springing out of the inner beauty of the country.

In her lifetime, however, she was also a major international figure, showing her work in exhibitions around the globe. As a woman in a largely male-dominated art-world, Hepworth took an active role in the way her work was presented. She was particular about documentation of her works, and collaborated closely with others. She established innovative ways to push the boundaries of her technique and thematic investigations and sustained a career that saw her mount a retrospective at Kröller-Müller Museum in 1965, represent Britain at the Venice Biennale in 1950 and won first prize at the São Paulo Bienal in 1959. She has influenced countless artists, designers, architects and performers such as Linder Sterling, Peter Jensen and Rebecca Warren citing her as an influential figure in their own creative practice.

Hepworth is known first and foremost as a sculptor, but she also worked in other mediums – and was very interested in documenting her own work through photography. The landscape around St Ives became part of the way her works were presented in the media; St Ives Bay, Godrevy Lighthouse and The Island all become compositional tools for those documenting her works, creating an additional dialogue between the forms and their surroundings.

From 1947-1949, during an illness her daughter suffered, Hepworth produced a series of drawings and paintings based on her time observing doctors and surgeons at St Mary’s hospital in Exeter. Read about their creation in Tate Etc. magazine

 

What do the critics say?

No militant feminist herself, she asked simply to be treated as a sculptor (never a sculptress), irrespective of sex.
~ Alan Bowness

Hepworth was an artist of extraordinary stature whose importance is still to some extent occluded. Over 50 years, from 1925 to her death in 1975, she made more than 600 works of sculpture remarkable in range and emotional force.
~ Fiona McCarthy

In these works this brave and indefatigable woman transcends the difficulties and ugliness of modern life and evokes a vision of radiant calm perfection.
~ Herbert Read

 

Hepworth in Quotes…

The sculptor carves because he must. He needs the concrete form of stone and wood for the expression of his idea and experience, and when the idea forms the material is found at once.

From the Sculptors point of view one can either be the spectator of the object or the object itself. For a few years I became the object.

I think every sculpture must be touched, it’s part of the way you make it and it’s really our first sensibility, it is the sense of feeling, it is first one we have when we’re born. I think every person looking at a sculpture should use his own body. You can’t look at a sculpture if you are going to stand stiff as a ram rod and stare at it, with as sculpture you must walk around it, bend toward it, touch it and walk away from it.

Text from the Tate Britain website

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Photo-collage with Helicoids in Sphere in the entrance hall of flats designed by Alfred and Emil Roth and Marcel Breuer at Doldertal, Zurich' 1939

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Photo-collage with Helicoids in Sphere in the entrance hall of flats designed by Alfred and Emil Roth and Marcel Breuer at Doldertal, Zurich
1939
Photograph, gelatin silver prints on paper
Private collection
© The Hepworth Photograph Collection

 

Raymond Coxon. 'Henry Moore, Edna Ginesi and Barbara Hepworth in Paris' 1920

 

Raymond Coxon (British, 1896-1997)
Henry Moore, Edna Ginesi and Barbara Hepworth in Paris
1920
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Infant' 1929

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Infant
1929
Wood
438 x 273 x 254mm
Tate
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Single Form (Eikon)' 1937-8, cast 1963

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Single Form (Eikon)
1937-1938, cast 1963
Bronze
1480 x 280 x 320mm
77 kg
Presented by the artist 1964
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

 

The original of this bronze was a carved plaster column set on a wooden base. The plaster was sent to Paris in 1938 for an exhibition and remained there until 1961. In 1963 Hepworth had it cast in an edition of seven. By the mid 1930s Hepworth had turned from carving semi-naturalistic figures and animals to an exploration of pure sculptural forms. She has written that her interest then centred on the relationship between a form and its surrounding space as well as its integral size, texture and weight. But these sculptures almost always retained an organic character.

 

Constellation of artworks in the Hepworth display

 

 

Constellation of artworks in the Hepworth display

This constellation forges connections between modern and contemporary works concerned with a sculptural relationship to the artist’s body and to the natural world, revealing a pathway that links geometric abstraction with the surrealist ability to recognise human shapes in natural forms. The phased development of Single Form (Eikon), as it moved through versions in plaster and wood to its final metal incarnation nearly 30 years later, raises questions about the role of sculpture and the importance of materials – concerns that are echoed in the works of Naum Gabo, Marisa Merz and Max Ernst. Louise Bourgeois’ printmaking suite presents a dark vision of biomorphic assimilation and amputation, while the strength and stability of Hepworth’s direct carving method is echoed on an intimate scale by Merz’s knitted nylon works, whose delicate appearance belies their tough industrial materials.

The geometric abstraction of Hepworth’s monolithic bronze highlights her association with the constructive art championed by Gabo in 1936, which focused on the universal nature of pure forms. She also had connections to the surrealist movement. With its phallic quality and contrasting purified aesthetic, the cast bronze sculpture can relate to both of these important movements; like other works in the constellation powerfully oscillating between abstraction and figuration.

In a strong statement on her own artistic philosophy, Hepworth proclaimed: ‘I think every person looking at a sculpture should use his own body. You can’t look at a sculpture if you are going to stand stiff as a ram rod and stare at it, with a sculpture you must walk around it, bend toward it, touch it and walk away from it.’ This invitation to engage in a bodily experience of sculpture shares its premise with Bruce Nauman’s cast plaster and fibreglass work, Isa Genzken’s totemic concrete monuments, and Daria Martin’s film In the Palace, which dramatically enlarges to architectural scale an iconic Giacometti sculpture, enabling performers to inhabit its time and space, in an uncanny fusing of materials and people.

Text from the Tate Britain website. No longer available online

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Double Exposure of Two Forms' 1937

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Double Exposure of Two Forms
1937
Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper
Private collection
© The Hepworth Photograph Collection

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Self-Photogram' 1933

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Self-Photogram
1933
Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper
Tate
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Paul Laib. 'Hepworth in the Mall Studio, London' 1933

 

Paul Laib (British born Germany, 1869-1958)
Hepworth in the Mall Studio, London
1933
The Barbara Hepworth Photograph Collection
© The de Laszlo Collection of Paul Laib Negatives, Witt Library, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

 

Paul Laib. 'Hepworth in the Mall Studio, London' 1933 (detail)

 

Paul Laib (British born Germany, 1869-1958)
Hepworth in the Mall Studio, London (detail)
1933
The Barbara Hepworth Photograph Collection
© The de Laszlo Collection of Paul Laib Negatives, Witt Library, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Fenestration of the Ear (The Hammer)' 1948

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Fenestration of the Ear (The Hammer)
1948
Oil and pencil on board
384 x 270mm
Purchased 1976
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Curved Form (Delphi)' 1955

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Curved Form (Delphi)
1955
© The Estate of Dame Barbara Hepworth

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Curved Form (Trevalgan)' 1956

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Curved Form (Trevalgan)
1956
Bronze on wooden base
902 x 597 x 673mm
Tate
Purchased 1960

 

Val Wilmer. 'Barbara Hepworth in the Palais de la Danse studio, St Ives, at work on the wood carving Hollow Form with White Interior' 1963

 

Val Wilmer (British, b. 1941)
Barbara Hepworth in the Palais de la Danse studio, St Ives, at work on the wood carving Hollow Form with White Interior
1963
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Val Wilmer. 'Barbara Hepworth in the Palais de la Danse studio, St Ives, at work on the wood carving Hollow Form with White Interior' 1963 (detail)

 

Val Wilmer (British, b. 1941)
Barbara Hepworth in the Palais de la Danse studio, St Ives, at work on the wood carving Hollow Form with White Interior (detail)
1963
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Morgan-Wells. 'Barbara Hepworth with the plaster of Single Form 1961-1964 at the Morris Singer foundry, London, May 1963' 1963

 

Morgan-Wells
Barbara Hepworth with the plaster of Single Form 1961-1964 at the Morris Singer foundry, London, May 1963
1963
Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth. 'Sea Form (Porthmeor)' 1958

 

Dame Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Sea Form (Porthmeor)
1958
Bronze on wooden base
830 x 1135 x 355mm
Tate
Presented by the artist 1967

 

 

Porthmeor is a beach close to Hepworth’s studio in St Ives, Cornwall. A critic thought this sculpture ‘seems to belong to the living world of the sea.’ However, the curling lip of the bronze is quite a literal representation of a breaking wave. At Porthmeor, Hepworth loved to watch the changing tide, the movement of sand and wind and the footprints of men and birds. For her, the rhythm of the tides was part of a natural order to which humankind also belongs.

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Oval Form (Trezion)' 1961-63

 

Barbara Hepworth
Oval Form (Trezion)
1961-1963
Bronze
940 x 1440 x 870mm
Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums Collections
Photograph courtesy The Kröller-Müller Otterlo, The Netherlands. Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan, Blufton University
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

Barbara Hepworth. 'Squares with Two Circles' 1963

 

Barbara Hepworth (British, 1903-1975)
Squares with Two Circles
1963
Bronze
Tate
© Bowness, Hepworth Estate

 

 

Tate Britain
Millbank, London SW1P 4RG
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 20 7887 8888

Opening hours:
10.00am – 18.00pm daily

Tate Britain website

LIKE ART BLART ON FACEBOOK

Back to top




Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, an art and cultural memory archive, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Doctor of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. If you would like to unsubscribe from the email list please email me at bunyanth@netspace.net.au and I will remove you asap. Thank you.

Join 2,962 other subscribers

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Orphans and small groups’ 1994-96 Part 2

Follow Art_Blart on Twitter
Art Blart on Pinterest

Blog Stats

  • 13,156,277 hits

Recent Posts

May 2023
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Archives

Categories

If you would like to unsubscribe from the email list please email me at bunyanth@netspace.net.au and I will remove you asap. Thank you.

Join 2,962 other subscribers