Archive for April 2nd, 2009

02
Apr
09

Opening 2: ‘Colour, Time’ by David Thomas at Nellie Castan Gallery, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 2nd April – 2nd May 2009

Opening: Thursday 2nd April 2009

 

Opening night crowd at 'Colour, Time' by David Thomas

 

Opening night crowd at Colour, Time by David Thomas with from right to left Farbenfreude Series: Movement of Colour, Heart (Large) 2008; Farbenfreude Series: Amid Dark and Light (Dark Painting) 2008; and Farbenfreude Series: A Gentle Pasing (Large) 2008 on back wall

 

 

“A photographed real space and an expanding undefinable painting space (the non-figurative form) confront each other. The result is a coexistence of various models of space, a coexistence and entanglement of inconsistent things.”

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Christoph Dahlhausen. David Thomas EIKON nr 53, Vienna, Austria, 2006

 

 

A slow burn painting, photography and composites show at Nellie Castan Gallery. Minimalist grid paintings combine with squares of colour taken out of photographs (again! as at the recent Richard Grigg show at Block Projects). This supposedly imparts profundity to insubstantial and mundane photographs that aim to comment on the existential nature of our being through the presence/absence of the missing spatio-temporal slice. This exhibition just didn’t hit the spot for me. Nice to catch up with Jason Smith Director of Heide Museum of Modern Art who was in attendance.

Dr Marcus Bunyan

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Many thankx to Nellie Castan Gallery for allowing me to publish the photographs in the posting. Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

Opening night crowd at 'Colour, Time' by David Thomas

 

Opening night crowd at Colour, Time by David Thomas with the series Length of Time 2009 on table

 

David Thomas. 'Length of Time Series: Blue tape on red monochrome' 2009

 

David Thomas
Length of Time Series: Blue tape on red monochrome
2009

 

David Thomas. 'End of Summer: Homage a Tati (small splash) 2009

 

David Thomas
End of Summer: Homage a Tati (small splash)
Enamel on photograph
2009

 

David Thomas. 'Black Reflection Painting: For William Barak' 2009

 

Opening night crowd in front of David Thomas’ Black Reflection Painting: For William Barak 2009

 

 

Nellie Castan Gallery

This gallery closed in 2013.

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02
Apr
09

Opening 1: ‘Territories’ at Project Space/Spare Room, Melbourne

Exhibition dates: 3rd April – 1st May 2009

Curator: Shane Hulbert
Opening: Thursday 2nd April, 2009

Group photography show with artists: Shane Hulbert (Aus), John Billan (Aus), So Hing Keung (HK), Stephanie Neoh (Aus), Darren Sylvester (Aus), Ming Tse Ching (HK), Kellyann Geurts (Aus), Andrew Guthrie (HK), Kim Lawler (Aus), Law Sum Po Jamsen (HK), and Lyndal Walker (Aus).

 

Great to catch up again with John Billan, Shane Hulbert and Les Walkling!

Marcus

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Please click on the photographs for a larger version of the image.

 

Sculptor Fredrick White in front of Lyndal Walker's 'The Time to Hesitate is Trough, no Time to Wallow in the Mire' 2009

 

Sculptor Fredrick White in front of Lyndal Walker’s The Time to Hesitate is Through, no Time to Wallow in the Mire 2009

 

Lyndal Walker. 'The Time to Hesitate is Through, no Time to Wallow in the Mire' 2009

 

Lyndal Walker
The Time to Hesitate is Through, no Time to Wallow in the Mire
2009

 

 

“The images in this show all reflect on an exploration of intersecting territories within Australia and the Chinese Special Administration Region [SAR] of Hong Kong. Central to this exploration are the cultural linkages between claimed and reclaimed territories, social territories and psychological territories and the way this in turn influences national identity. The claim is that these things of importance, and the way we respond to the notion of territory, have recurring similarities between different cultures.

Despite the broadness of the title, the notion of territories is becoming increasingly relevant in a global community, as the traditional borderlines and barriers that define who we are and what we stand for as a culture change in response to internal and external shifts.”

Shane Hulbert 2009

 

'Territories' opening night crowd at Project Space/Spare Room, Melbourne

 

Territories opening night crowd at Project Space/Spare Room, Melbourne

 

Ming Tse Chong. 'City Still Life II' 2008

 

Ming Tse Chong
City Still Life II
2008

 

 

Project Space/Spare Room
RMIT Building 94, Level 2, Room 1
23-27 Cardigan Street, Carlton, VIC, 3053

Opening hours (during exhibition periods):
Monday and Tuesday by appointment only
Wednesday to Friday 10am – 5pm
Saturday 12 – 4pm

RMIT Intersect website

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02
Apr
09

Exhibition: ‘Picturing America: Photorealism in the 1970s’ at Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin

Exhibition dates: 7th March – 10th May 2009

 

Many thankx to the Deutsche Guggenheim for allowing me to publish the art work in the posting. Please click on the art work for a larger version of the image.

 

“My paintings are about light, about the way things look in their environment and especially about how things look painted. Form, colour and space are at the whim of reality, their discovery and organisation is the assignment of the realist painter.”

Ralph Goings

 

 

Richard Estes. 'Telephone Booths' 1967

 

Richard Estes
Telephone Booths
1967

 

Richard Estes. 'Supreme Hardware' 1974

 

Richard Estes
Supreme Hardware
1974

 

Audrey Flack. 'Queen' 1976

 

Audrey Flack
Queen
1976

 

Chuck Close. 'Leslie' 1973

 

Chuck Close
Leslie
1973

 

Ralph Goings. 'Airstream' 1970

 

Ralph Goings
Airstream
1970

 

Ralph Goings. 'Dicks Union General' 1971

 

Ralph Goings
Dicks Union General
1971

 

 

By the end of the 1960s, a number of young artists working in the United States had begun making large-scale realist paintings directly from photographs. With often meticulous detail, they portrayed the objects, places, and people that defined urban and suburban everyday life in America. In contrast to the Pop artists, they did not present their ubiquitous, often mundane, subject matter in a glamorised or ironic manner. They sought instead to achieve a great degree of objectivity and precision in the execution of their work in an effort to stay more or less faithful to the mechanically generated images that served as their source material. They developed various means of systematically translating photographic information onto canvas. In prioritising the way the camera sees over the way the eye sees, they underscored the complexity of the relationship between the reproduction and the reproduced as well as the impact of photography on the perception of both daily life and reality in general.

A number of terms were proposed in quick succession to describe this novel approach to painting, chief among them Super-Realism, Hyperrealism, and Photorealism. The artists identified as Photorealists neither formed a coherent group nor considered themselves to be part of a movement, and a number of them actively challenged their association with the label. Nevertheless, in the late 1960s and 1970s, the seventeen artists in Picturing America: Photorealism in the 1970s – Robert Bechtle, Charles Bell, Tom Blackwell, Chuck Close, Robert Cottingham, Don Eddy, Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, Franz Gertsch, Ralph Goings, Ron Kleemann, Richard McLean, Malcolm Morley, Stephen Posen, John Salt, Ben Schonzeit, and Paul Staiger – were exploring a related set of issues, methods, and subjects that led critics, curators, and art historians to both exhibit and write about their work as a coherent trend in contemporary art. Picturing America focuses on this formative, defining period in the history of Photorealism.

The exhibition includes thirty-one paintings, a number of them the most iconic and masterful works of 1967-82, for example Richard Estes’s Telephone Booths (1967) and Chuck Close’s Leslie (1973). Picturing America is divided into four sections, three exploring key themes of Photorealist painting during the 1970s – Reflections on the City, Culture of Consumption, and American Life – and a fourth dedicated to a portfolio of ten lithographs made on the occasion of Documenta 5 in 1972, which featured the first major group showing of Photorealism.

Text from the Deutsche Guggenheim website

 

Robert Bechtle. 'Foster's Freeze, Escalon' 1975

 

Robert Bechtle
Foster’s Freeze, Escalon
1975

 

Robert Bechtle. 'Alameda Gran Torino' 1974

 

Robert Bechtle
Alameda Gran Torino
1974

 

 

Deutsche Guggenheim

This museum closed in 2013.

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Dr Marcus Bunyan

Dr Marcus Bunyan is an Australian artist and writer. His art work explores the boundaries of identity and place. He writes Art Blart, a photographic archive and form of cultural memory, which posts mainly photography exhibitions from around the world. He holds a Dr of Philosophy from RMIT University, Melbourne, a Master of Arts (Fine Art Photography) from RMIT University, and a Master of Art Curatorship from the University of Melbourne.

Marcus Bunyan black and white archive: ‘Dogs, chickens, cattle’ 1994-95

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